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Gen17

Welcome to the inaugural intergenerational Asian Jewish Community survey. Help put a spotlight on diverse Jewish Asia by taking this 15-minute survey. 

How you can help

As Asia’s influence around the world is growing rapidly, it is imperative that the Jewish communities of Asia are connected with the broader Jewish world.

The survey will help share your community’s stories, successes, and aspirations as part of the global Jewish conversation. By completing this survey, you will enhance the understanding of local Jewish communities, including demographics, background, education, values, level of observance, views on Jewish continuity and connection with Israel.

A digital report will be available for anyone who is interested in early 2018.

Please share this link to ensure there is a viable and meaningful sample. The survey will be open until Friday 27 October.

The survey is accessible via a unique link which will be sent to you by email. Although you can complete the survey on a mobile phone, we recommend using a tablet or laptop.

More information

Asia’s Gen17 Jewish Community survey is designed to collect information on individual experiences, needs and expectations, with a particular focus on the unique qualities of Jewish communities in Asia. The survey explores a range of issues facing the transient nature and high number of expats that make up the Asian Jewish community. These include background, identity, Jewish connectedness, philanthropy, and future expectations.

The results of this survey will help provide vital information to enable communities to make informed decisions and guide optimal allocation of resources.

The Australian Centre for Jewish Civilisation at Monash University leads this project, which is being conducted in co-operation with Australian Jewish Funders, Jewish Funders Network, Jewish organisations in the Asian region and thanks to the vision and support of the Pratt Foundation.

For further details, see our Frequently asked questions.


Confidentiality

The Gen17 survey is anonymous: there are no records that link individuals with completed surveys. The survey is undertaken under terms approved by the Monash University Research Ethics Committee and reports produced from the survey will present statistical findings, with no reference to the responses of individuals.

Frequently asked questions

How long does it take to complete the survey?

What is the point of the survey?

Will the survey be used for fundraising?

Is the survey anonymous?

Who is enabling this project?

How will I be able to find out the results?

What if I have a complaint about the project?


How long does it take to complete the survey?

Most respondents are able to complete the survey in 15 minutes. The survey is best completed on a computer screen/iPad, but it can also be completed on a smartphone.


What is the point of the survey?

The objective of the survey is to establish a better understanding of the views and needs of Jewish communities in Asia, including:

  • educational background
  • the constant and changing elements in Jewish identity
  • issues of greatest priority
  • present-day challenges
  • future expectations.

The survey will provide information for better planning, funding and resourcing.


Will the survey be used for fundraising?

The survey has no specific fundraising purpose. Those completing the survey are not asked for donations.


Is the survey anonymous? Is it possible to identify individual respondents? Can my password be used to identify me?

The survey is entirely confidential and anonymous. No record is kept of password allocations to individuals or households. This project is being conducted under the strict ethics and confidentiality procedures of Monash University.


Who is enabling this project?

Monash University is funding the work of the lead Victorian researcher, Professor Andrew Markus. The Asia survey is being made possible by Australian Jewish Funders, Jewish Funders Network and Pratt Foundation.



How will I be able to find out the results?

Findings will be released through a report provided to Jewish communities and will be presented by Professor Andrew Markus at the upcoming Asia and Jewish World gathering in Hong Kong in November. It will also be possible for individuals to request a copy of the report.


What if I have a complaint about the project, or find the questionnaire to be distressing?

It is unlikely that completing the questionnaire will cause any distress, but should this occur, participants can contact Lifeline in Australia on +61 13 11 14 or go to the Lifeline website. Or please email gen17@monash.edu.

If you have a complaint concerning the manner in which this research is being conducted, please contact:

Human Ethics
Monash Research Office
Monash University Human Research Ethics Committee
Monash University, Victoria 3800 Australia
Phone: +61 3 9905 5490
Email: muhrec@monash.edu.

The reference number for this project is 0506.