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Galaxy Evolution Group Research

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[ Galaxy Evolution Group Publications ]

Researchers:
Michael Brown

Students:
Ryan Brunet, Jacob Crossett, Tim Dolley, Amelia Fraser-McKelvie, Dane Kleiner, Alex Grace Ryan

How galaxies evolve over cosmic time is one of the most important and long-standing topics in astrophysics. Our Milky Way is continuing to grow with stars being stripped from companion galaxies and new stars are being formed in gaseous clouds such as the Orion Nebula. However, most of the stars in the nearby Universe were formed roughly ten billion years ago, when the Universe was very young. As a result, how galaxies grow over cosmic time remains a matter of ongoing and vigourous debate.

The galaxy evolution group undertakes research across a wide range of galaxy environments (clusters, groups, and individual galaxies) and look-back times (from the present day to very high redshift) to determine how galaxies evolve in different places and at different times. To do this, we make regular use of national and international observational facilities; both ground-based (e.g. the Gemini Telescopes and the Anglo-Australian Telescope) and satellites (e.g. the Hubble Space Telescope and Chandra).

We welcome enquiries from suitably qualified persons to join our team at Honours, PhD, post-doctoral, or more senior levels.

NGC 7331 is a galaxy with many similarities to our home, the Milky Way. Sloan Digital Sky Survey/Michael Brown NGC 7331 is a galaxy with many similarities to our home, the Milky Way. Sloan Digital Sky Survey/Michael Brown