Top minds meet on Asia

Around 30 participants, including 10 researchers from diverse disciplines such as Science, Education, Business and Economics, Sociology, Tourism and Arts, exchanged their research interests and discussed how to develop collaborative projects.

Around 30 participants, including 10 researchers from diverse disciplines such as Science, Education, Business and Economics, Sociology, Tourism and Arts, exchanged their research interests and discussed how to develop collaborative projects.

Earlier this month, Monash Asia Institute (MAI) undertook an innovative research initiative, organising a Research Day attended by faculties from across the University.

The Research Day aimed to facilitate inter-disciplinary work on environment, sustainability and social change in Asia, and identify collaborative research opportunities such as application for internal funding schemes and Australian Research Council (ARC) Linkage Projects.

Around 30 participants, including 10 researchers from diverse disciplines such as Science, Education, Business and Economics, Sociology, Tourism and Arts, exchanged their research interests and discussed how to develop collaborative projects.

Science’s Professor Tina Overton provided her expertise in developing cross-disciplinary studies and funding opportunities.

“(It was) a fascinating seminar bringing together colleagues from very diverse backgrounds to discuss sustainability and how it might play out in Asia,” Professor Overton said.

“The participants did very well to pull together discussion and come away with a concrete proposal to take forward.”

Facilitators of the seminar, Education’s Dr Sylvia Christine Almeida and Science’s Dr Mahbub Sarkar explained the importance of the collaboration.

“Monash University has been at the forefront of leading environment and sustainability through its approaches and educational thrusts. However, few opportunities exist for developing cross-disciplinary and cross-faculty collaborative work in this field,” they reported.

“We much appreciate that the Monash Asia Institute took the initiative to organise this brainstorming seminar where academics could discuss and identify research projects to address sustainability issues in Asian contexts. We hope to keep the conversations and collaborations going.”

Director of MAI Professor Koichi Iwabuchi said the Research Day addressed a growing need for cross-disciplinary approaches to problem-solving.

“It is becoming more important for academics to develop inter-disciplinary and trans-Asian collaborative projects that aims to make an actual impact on significant issues that the world confronts such as environment, human mobility and cultural diversity,” Professor Iwabuchi said.

“While such collaboration would take some time to develop, MAI aspires to establish a collaborative research platform. We encourage everyone to contact us with ideas for organising similar seminars.”

Visit the Monash Asia Institute website for more information.