Award for Research Impact (Economic and Social)

Introduced in 2014, this Award recognises excellence by researchers who have achieved, or are currently achieving, outstanding economic and/or societal impact. The award celebrates success in collaborative partnerships and knowledge transfer. The Award replaces the Innovation and External Collaboration Award.

2016 Tony Velkov with Jian Li, Phil Thompson, Roger Nation and Kade Roberts

Bacterial infections are responsible for millions of deaths each year and antibiotic resistance has evolved into a serious global health concern. Sadly, the ‘magic bullet’ antimicrobial therapies we have gratuitously used over the past decades are rapidly losing their calibre.

Our research has been crucial to generate valuable intellectual property for Monash and significantly progress our NIH funded novel lipopeptide preclinical development program. We expected our research will lead to two clinical candidates that can be commercialised. This will in turn hasten the introduction of a lipopeptide antibiotic for the treatment of infections caused by Gram-negative ‘superbugs’ as a medicine for human use.
Read more about Fighting Superbugs

2015 Chris Porter, Colin Pouton and Peter Scammells

In 2015 Chris Porter, Colin Pouton and Peter Scammells received this award in recognition of their long-standing collaboration and work to improve drug delivery.  Low water solubility is a particular challenge to achieving clinically-relevant oral bioavailability.  A strategy for enhancing drug absorption after oral administration is co-administration with lipids.  MIPS has a leadership position working with poorly water soluble drugs, and this collaboration has developed an innovative, and valuable, ionic liquids technology platform.  In early 2015 MIPS entered into a collaborative, embedded research partnership and technology licensing agreement with Casugel Inc.
Read more about the Capsugel partnership

2014 Michelle McIntosh

In 2014 Dr Michelle McIntosh received this award in recognition of the work she and her team have achieved in developing an inhaled, stable, self-administered, low-cost, oxytocin product for use in resource-poor countries. Post-partum haemorrhage is the single largest contributing factor to maternal death worldwide. It can be effectively treated or prevented with an injection of the drug oxytocin. Currently, access to a stable, oxytocin injection in resource-poor countries is limited.
Read more about our life-saving work on oxytocin