BMS2042 - Human genetics - 2018

6 points, SCA Band 3, 0.125 EFTSL

Undergraduate - Unit

Refer to the specific census and withdrawal dates for the semester(s) in which this unit is offered.

Faculty

Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Organisational Unit

School of Biomedical Sciences

Chief examiner(s)

Coral Warr

Coordinator(s)

Dr Saw Hoon Lim

Unit guides

Offered

Clayton

  • Second semester 2018 (On-campus)

Prerequisites

BMS1062 or MCB2011/MOL2011

Co-requisites

Must be enrolled in one of the following:

  • Bachelor of Biomedical Science (including double degree programs)
  • Bachelor of Biomedical Science (Scholar Program)
  • Bachelor of Biomedical Science Advanced with Honours
  • Bachelor of Biotechnology

Prohibitions

GEN2041 and GEN2052.

Synopsis

This unit introduces the basic genetic principles underlying modern human genetics. Topics include: the central role of genes in the inheritance of traits, and the complex variation in inheritance patterns that arise due to interactions of genes with each other and the environment; the identification, characterisation and mapping of human genes; the value of model organisms in genetics; chromosome variation and its role in both evolution and human disease; how genes function and how genetic malfunction can lead to genetic disease; how an understanding of such diseases at the genetic level may assist in diagnosis, prevention and therapy; the genetic control of development; genetic counselling and calculating risk for genetic diseases; human evolutionary genetics.

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:

  1. Explain the central role of genes in the inheritance of traits and the complex variation in inheritance patterns that arise due to interactions of genes with each other and the environment;
  2. Explain how genetic variation is generated by mutation and the importance of this in phenotypic variation, evolution and disease;
  3. Describe the value of model organisms in studying human gene function in development and disease;
  4. Demonstrate understanding of the relevance and value of genetics to human society;
  5. Demonstrate skills in independent problem-solving and experimental design, and in data collection, analysis and interpretation;
  6. Demonstrate skills in written and oral communication through written reports and oral presentations of research findings by small groups.

Assessment

  • Weekly practicals (30%)
  • Short answer practical test (15%)
  • Independent project (10%)
  • Examination (2 hours) (45%) (hurdle)

Workload requirements

3 lectures and 3 hours practical (or equivalent) per week.

See also Unit timetable information

This unit applies to the following area(s) of study