Federation Fellows

The Australian Research Council designed the Federation Fellowships scheme to support excellence in research by attracting world-leading researchers to key positions in Australia.

Awarded 2008

Professor James Whisstock
Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Professor James Whisstock

Professor James Whisstock is a world-leading expert on bio-information and structural biology. He is one of the world's foremost authorities on the group of proteins known as serpins.

Professor Whisstock is a National Health and Medical Research Council Principal Research Fellow and Logan Fellow at Monash University. He is also a Chief Investigator in the ARC Centre of Excellence in Structural and Functional Microbial Genomics.

Membrane Attack Complex/Perforin-like (MACPF) proteins play central roles in vertebrate immunity, embryonic patterning and neural development. Professor Whisstock's research program aims to better understand the links between immunity and development. Data from his research will be crucial for developing approaches to control unwanted MACPF function in transplant rejection and diseases like Type 1 diabetes.

Professor Trevor Lithgow
Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

Professor Trevor Lithgow

Professor Lithgow is an international leader in the fields of protein targeting and membrane assembly.

His research is working towards an understanding of the molecular machine that transfers proteins into mitochondria.

Professor Lithgow aims to capitalise on biochemical techniques and bioinformatics developed by his laboratory. He hopes to apply these techniques to learn more about the structure, function and assembly of the molecular machines in bacteria and to better understand how the human immune system can cope with microbial invaders.

His work involves research in genetics, microbiology, computer science and molecular biology, and links research groups in Australia with key international laboratories.

Awarded 2007

Professor Douglas MacFarlane
School of Chemistry

Professor Douglas MacFarlane

Professor Douglas MacFarlane is researching a family of liquids that has an ability to preserve bioactive molecules.

His work investigates these new biocompatible ionic liquids for applications in diabetes management and the treatment of diseases such as haemophilia.

Professor Bernadette McSherry
Faculty of Law

Professor Bernadette McSherry

Professor Bernadette McSherry is undertaking research into national model legal frameworks. It is work that will help shape the way individuals with mental illnesses can access the highest standard of health care.

Awarded 2006

Professor Jamie Rossjohn
Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

Professor Jamie Rossjohn

Professor Jamie Rossjohn's research centres on understanding the basis of infection and immunity, specifically host recognition. He is exploring responses developed by the pathogen and drug design to modulate and/or counteract these events.

Professor Rossjohn's research team and collaborators have provided seminal insight into the processes linked to infection and immunity, and have published more than 90 research papers in this area.

Awarded 2005

Professor John Bowman
School of Biological Sciences

Professor John Bowman

Professor Bowman is investigating the role of three genetic programs in patterning meristem-derived plant organs.

Leaves and other plant organs are derived from meristems, organised groups of self-renewing stem cells found at the tips of shoots and roots. The size, shape and polarity of plant organs are controlled by information derived from these meristems.

Professor Bowman aims to provide information on how to manipulate the growth and development of plant organs. This has broad implications for agriculture and forestry. It will also provide a better understanding of how plant architecture is genetically controlled.

Professor Barry Muddle
Department of Materials Engineering

Professor Barry Muddle

Professor Muddle is researching the early stages of nanostructure formation and the factors that control their stability.

Nanostructures can range from simple inorganic structures such as colloidal gold particles to complex biological molecules such as arrays of bacterial cell surface proteins.

Professor Muddle's research will have applications ranging from advanced light alloys to quantum dots in semiconductor compounds.

Professor Alan Bond
School of Chemistry

Professor Alan Bond

Professor Bond is using electrochemistry (the study of interactions between electric and chemical phenomena) to improve emerging technologies in green chemistry, nanochemistry, photoelectrochemical catalysis and sensors.

He aims to provide commercial opportunities in the area of scientific instrumentation by transforming experimentally generated or simulated data sets into instantly recognised images.

Past Federation Fellows

Professor Amanda Lynch
School of Geography and Environmental Science

Professor Amanda Lynch

Professor Lynch is investigating complexity in climate impact assessment. Her research aims to develop a model-based methodology to characterise the extremes that are not usually predicted by climate models.

Key extremes of importance to stakeholders in Australia and around the world include coastal flooding and fire. These events, in the context of regional climate variation, will act as test cases for the methodology.

From this work, the likelihood of policy-relevant events in the future can be evaluated.

Professor Lenore Manderson
School of Psychology, Psychiatry and Psychological Medicine

Professor Lenore Manderson

Professor Lenore Manderson joined Monash University in January 2006.

She is a medical anthropologist and social historian who also publishes in sociology and public health. Her interests include the anthropology of chronic conditions and disability, infectious disease in resource-poor settings, gender and sexuality, and questions of embodiment and identity.

Professor Manderson was an inaugural ARC Federation Fellow at the University of Melbourne, then at Monash University, from May 2002 until April 2007. Under this award, she conducted research on chronic illness, disability, social relationships and wellbeing, including an inter-disciplinary multi-country study on the social and cultural impact of chronic illness and disability in Australia and Southeast Asia.

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