In sync with science

In sync with science

2007

Monash partners with the Australian Synchrotron

Australian SynchrotronA synchrotron in Australia had been a priority for Australian researchers for many years, with the Australian Academy of Science first floating the idea in 1989. At the time, scientists interested in using synchrotron technology, which accelerates electrons to almost the speed of light, needed to travel overseas to Europe or the US. It was clear that Australia needed its own machine if it wanted to keep up with international innovation.

The synchrotron has been invaluable to Monash, whose staff and students are able to conduct experiments in the Synchrotron; international researchers have travelled to Monash to make use of the technology.

In June 2001, the Victorian Government announced that it had secured funding and land to build the football-field sized machine. The Australian Synchrotron would be situated on land near Monash University’s Clayton campus, and be affiliated with the new Science and Technology Research and Innovation Precinct (STRIP). Monash would contribute to the project and be a close partner, along with the Victorian Government, New Zealand Government, CSIRO, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) and the University of Melbourne.

The synchrotron has been invaluable to Monash, whose staff and students are able to conduct experiments in the Synchrotron; international researchers have travelled to Monash to make use of the technology. "To have the Australian Synchrotron right on our doorstep means Monash can take a pre-eminent position in the development of synchrotron science and in the application of the Australian Synchrotron to many research fields," said Professor Rob Lewis, Director of the Monash Centre for Synchrotron Science.