New medical model

New medical model

1961

Professor Rod AndrewIt was planned that the new Monash Faculty of Medicine would combine the theory and practice by establishing a hospital on the Clayton Campus. While the campus hospital was never built, Professor Rod Andrew chose his first professors with the dream of it in mind. The Dean from 1960 to his retirement in 1976, he also believed the Faculty should include studies on the social aspects of medicine. He set up classes on disease prevention, psychology and sociology. Students were taught not only about the human body, but also discovered how to be a doctor.

In a bold move, Dr Rod Andrew was appointed Foundation Dean of Medicine at the new university. Andrew was a member of the Interim Council and Dean of the Alfred Hospital Clinical School at the time. His approach to medical training was progressive, and emphasised the need for students to learn both scientific and clinical skills. Born in 1911 in Perth, he attended Geelong Grammar and the University of Melbourne. After stints at the Royal Melbourne and Royal Children’s Hospitals, he joined the Australian Imperial Force during World War II, whilst finishing his Doctor of Medicine (MD). It was while working at the University of Melbourne and the Clinical Research Centre at the Alfred Hospital that Andrew developed his progressive educational philosophy. He felt students needed to learn to deal with patients alongside studies of anatomy and science. A good doctor, he felt, needed both sets of skills right from the start. It was this outlook on medical education that sparked the idea of a university-based hospital, although the plans eventually fell through. Andrew was Dean of Medicine at Monash from 1960 until his retirement in 1976.