Event recording - COVID-19 and Violent Extremism: Gender Perspectives

A video recording of the event "COVID-19 and Violent Extremism: Gender Perspectives" is now available to watch online. The online seminar took place on Wednesday 3 June 2020 and is part of a series co-hosted with: Georgetown Institute for Women, Peace and Security, the LSE Centre for Women, Peace and Security, the PRIO Centre on Gender, Peace and Security and the Women, Peace and Security Institute in the Kofi Annan International Peacekeeping Training Centre.

Description

The COVID-19 pandemic has posed an unprecedented crisis internationally. Though focus is often placed on government responses, the pandemic has also allowed for violent extremist groups to both leverage and capitalise on the effects of COVID-19, impacting women and men differently. We have seen VE organisations respond to the virus by ramping up online propaganda messages, spreading conspiracies and engaging in misinformation campaigns. These organisations seek to foster perceptions of inefficiency and mistrust in government. In some countries, non-state armed groups have adopted state-like functions by providing social welfare services and enforcing local lockdowns vis-à-vis the state. This event will bring together international experts to discuss how COVID-19 has impacted on gender dynamics in violent groups around the world.

Panellists

FatimaDr Fatima Akilu is the Executive Director of Neem Foundation, Nigeria. She is also a university educator and an advocate for marginalized groups working in the area of psychology and health for more than two decades. Akilu has had extensive experience working with forensic dually diagnosed mentally retarded women, violent offenders, and sex offenders. Previously head of communication for the Senior Special Assistant to the President on the Millennium Development Goals, she was Chairman of the Editorial Board Leadership Newspapers.


MiaProfessor Mia Bloom is a Fellow with New America's International Security program and professor of communication and Middle East studies at Georgia State University in Atlanta. She conducts ethnographic field research in Europe, the Middle East and South Asia and speaks eight languages. She has authored several books and articles on terrorism and violent extremism including Dying to Kill: The Allure of Suicide Terror (2005), Living Together After Ethnic Killing (2007) Bombshell: Women and Terror (2011) and Small Arms: Children and Terror (2019). Bloom’s newest book is Veiled Threats; Women and Global Jihad is scheduled for 2020 release.


NoorHudaDr Noor Huda Ismail joined the S Rajaratnam School of International Studies at the Nanyang Technological University as a Visiting Fellow after completing his PhD at Monash University, Melbourne, on an Australian Award Scholarship. In 2005, he was awarded the United Kingdom’s Chevening Scholarship to pursue a Master’s degree at St Andrew’s University, Scotland. On his return to Indonesia in 2008, he established the Institute for International Peace Building to help the social rehabilitation and re-integration of convicted Indonesian terrorists by employing them upon their release in social enterprises such as Dapoer Bistik Solo, a cafe he set up in Central Java.


SanamSanam Naraghi Anderlini MBE is the Director of the Centre for Women, Peace and Security in the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE). Sanam is the Founder and CEO of the International Civil Society Action Network (ICAN) which spearheads a network of women peacebuilders internationally.  She is a globally recognised advocate in the field of women, peace and security. She has written numerous publications, including three books, promoting the inclusion of women within peacebuilding.


CathrineDr Cathrine Thorleifsson is a Researcher at the Centre for Research on Extremism: Right-Wing Extremism, Hate Crime and Political Violence at the University of Oslo. She holds a PhD in Anthropology from the London School of Economics and Political Science (2012), specializing in the theories of nationalism based on two years fieldwork in Israel. Her postdoctoral research focus on ethnographies of the far (radical and extreme) right and the intersecting ways in which antisemitic and anti-Muslim imaginaries are transnationally produced and propagated online and offline. Her books include: Nationalist responses to the crises in Europe: Old and New Hatreds (Routledge 2019) and Nationalism and the Politics of Fear in Israel (I.B. Tauris 2015).


Alexandra Phelan 350x350Chair: Dr Alexandra Phelan is a Lecturer in Politics and International Relations and Deputy Director of Monash Gender, Peace and Security Centre. Her research interests include insurgent governance and legitimation activities, insurgent women, political violence and organised crime with particular focus on Latin America. Alex's research at GPS focuses on gendered approaches to understanding terrorism and violent extremism. She currently serves on the editorial board for Studies in Conflict and Terrorism, and has recently edited a special issue for the journal entitled "Terrorism, Gender and Women: Toward an Integrated Research Agenda."


This event is part of a series co-hosted with: Georgetown Institute for Women, Peace and Security, the LSE Centre for Women, Peace and Security, the PRIO Centre on Gender, Peace and Security and the Women, Peace and Security Institute in the Kofi Annan International Peacekeeping Training Centre.

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