Graduate researchers

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Turki Mohammad M Alshehri

Turki Mohammad M Alshehri

Research topic:

Documentary Film Production & Ethics in the Saudi Arabian Context.

Why is your research important?

My research explores how documentary films are being funded, produced and distributed in Saudi Arabia. This investigation will help to understand also the roles of Saudi filmmakers within different contexts which underpins the foundation for one of my research questions: how documentary filmmakers understand and deal with ethical issues in their films. The contribution of my research lies in suggesting practical ethical codes for filmmakers.

Rachael Helen Anderson

Rachael Helen Anderson

Research topic:

Media representations of the Christchurch terror attacks: Framing terrorism, security and national identity.

Why is your research important?

Before the Christchurch terror attacks in 2019, New Zealand had often been considered as a nation ‘free from terrorism’. News media representations of the Christchurch attacks provide a site to interrogate how terrorism, security and national identity are discursively framed in both local and international contexts. This analysis aims to illuminate how representations of terrorism are produced and negotiated within a specific geopolitical space.

Apinya Anphanlam

Apinya Anphanlam

Supervisors:

A/Prof Olivia Khoo (Main), A/Prof Therese Davis (External)

Marija Antic

Marija Antic

Research topic:

My research focuses on Iranian diasporic women’s cinema and it explores the intersectional relations between cultural belonging, gender and sexuality.

Why is your research important?

This project offers a scholarly contribution in mapping the current trends in transnational filmmaking by pointing to the importance of the diasporic intersectional identity in generating vibrant feminist film culture. It revises the concepts of diasporic and accented cinema in order to include feminist political thought and advances current debates of women’s film authorship among ethnic groups whose voices have been traditionally marginalised.

Melanie Ashe

Melanie Ashe

Research topic:

How resource-extraction has shaped the Australian moving image and its surrounding industry and cultures, focusing on the region around Broken Hill.

Why is your research important?

Due to the escalating global climate crisis, it is paramount to challenge how the moving image is understood in relation to our surrounding ‘natural’ environment. My project is important in that it argues that Australian film production has strong connections to the ‘natural’ environment, and interrogates how Australia’s resource-extraction economy is linked to film through practices of manufacture, representation, and other cultural industries.

Victor Elias Araneda Jure

Victor Elias Araneda Jure

Research topic:

The Process of Adapting Alternative Comics into Film.

Why is your research important?

The field of Comics Studies is relatively new, and historically, research focussing on comics adaptations to the screen have centred largely around mainstream superhero adventures. By introducing and unpacking the world of Alternative Comics and their counterpart film version, I attempt to expand this knowledge base, and validate the Alternative Comics branch as a culturally rich source of inspiration for adapters and the arts more broadly.

Daisy Jane Bailey

Daisy Jane Bailey

Research topic:

The emotions of exile and activism of Chartist and Young Ireland political prisoners in nineteenth century Australia and their impacts on democracy.

Why is your research important?

My research, connected to the ARC funded project Conviction Politics, is seeking to reframe Australian colonial history through a digital, interdisciplinary, and transnational approach. This research is important in understanding how the public sphere and democratic reforms were impacted by convicts in the Australian colonies, and what this means for activism in the present political context.

Lynne Patricia Carmichael

Lynne Patricia Carmichael

Research topic:

For the Record; The ABC [Australian Broadcasting Corporation] and the art world of Australian classical music, 1942-2000

Why is your research important?

This thesis investigates areas of ABC activity that have rarely been investigated - in particular, in-house recording activities and the contributions of ABC music activities to the Australian musical art world. Based on work by Becker and Van Maanen, a model for this investigation has been constructed to enable analysis of these activities in terms of various broadcast-specific Domains within an Organisational Structure.

Aizi Chang

Aizi Chang

Research topic:

The analysis of Feminists' participation in Mainland China in New Media.

Why is your research important?

Study the way Chinese feminism is promoted in new media. Seek an effective path for the later promotion of feminism in China.

Kate Euphemia Clark

Kate Euphemia Clark

Research topic:

My thesis focuses on virtual reality (VR) and video games and the sense of immersion that these mediums have the potential to produce.

Why is your research important?

My research is important because how immersion works in VR is often misunderstood. VR is often used as a tool to reduce implicit biases and create empathy, however, my research suggests that this is an inappropriate use of VR technology that promotes both identity and disaster tourism, and has the potential to increase implicit bias. My work creates a new lens to view virtual reality, opening up new possibilities for this technology.

Jack Elliot Clarke

Jack Elliot Clarke

Research topic:

My thesis explores the evolving role of audiovisual remix in contemporary digital culture, in relation to online videos and social media communities.

Why is your research important?

Audiovisual remix is one of the most prevalent and culturally relevant forms of expression in the digitally developed world today. My research evaluates the evolution of remix-based social media and ultimately advocates for a more universal understanding of remix, addressing the imbalance between media-literate users and more susceptible, inexperienced users.

Clare Majella Diviny

Clare Majella Diviny

Research topic:

My thesis is a genre study that examines the history of the teen figure on screen and social fears surrounding teens and the supernatural.

Why is your research important?

My research fills a number of gaps in the existing literature as it identifies a collection of teen supernatural programs as the supernatural teen television (STT) genre. It also traces the history of the supernatural teen onscreen, historical conventions for representing teens in film and television and the satanic panic era as an influential antecedent to STT.

Shane Francis Fairlie

Shane Francis Fairlie

Research topic:

The China Story: a media narrative analysis of Beijing’s global communications.

Why is your research important?

To date, most analysis of China's global state media has focused on ideological and economic drivers, and international dynamics. Other studies have examined the nature of this media expansion, including platforms used and geographies targeted. However, my research analyzes how China’s news production has been coded to promote particular foreign policy messages and aims to shed new light on what the CCP leadership seeks to communicate and why.

Tegan Jade Ellery Farrell

Tegan Jade Ellery Farrell

Research topic:

Parallel realms: Lived experience of popular religion in contemporary Taiwan.

Why is your research important?

Taiwan’s popular religion is estimated to be practised by up to 87.9 per cent of Taiwanese and deeply ingrained in daily life. Diverging from past scholarship, this project documents popular religion as experienced by its practitioners. It draws on oral history’s capacity to empower people and challenge dominant histories, thereby offering 'ordinary' Taiwanese voice in the academic discussion and historical record of their religion.

Samuel Charles Freeman

Samuel Charles Freeman

Research topic:

Investigating the ethical challenges and issues in the design, implementation and use of artificial intelligence in the Australian healthcare sector.

Why is your research important?

With the increasing use of AI in healthcare – making it more efficient and patient focussed; producing faster diagnoses while reducing errors; assisting patients in the management of symptoms and coping with chronic illness; and reducing or avoiding bias and errors in data – this research seeks to understand the associated ethical issues in its design and use to provide practical tools for the healthcare sector to ethically implement AI systems.

Supervisors:

Prof Mark Andrejevic (Main), Prof Jon Paul Mccormack (Associate), Prof Tam Nguyen (External)

Meghan Belinda Hopper

Meghan Belinda Hopper

Research topic:

"Here we are now, represent us": Women, Policy and Process in Australian Political Journalism, 1984-2010

Why is your research important?

My research examines media representations of women and men during Australian federal election campaigns. It contributes to thinking around the role of women in politics and their performance as 'critical actors' for feminist policy outcomes, looking at how representation has shifted over time. The representation of women in politics and their treatment by the media is a topic which remains relevant both locally and internationally.