Graduate researchers

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Daniel Bacchieri

Daniel Bacchieri

Research topic:

Street musicians from Melbourne in the digital world.

Why is your research important?

The purpose of my research is to demonstrate the global nature of the street music scene, focusing on Bourke Street in Melbourne, Victoria, Australia, as a site of both local and translocal interconnections. It explores the connection between offline and online environments: street performances are recorded on smartphones, shared on social networks, bringing up global audiences to local musicians.

David Bernard Haberfeld

David Bernard Haberfeld

Research topic:

Bacharach, Britney and Buchla: An Analysis of the Evolving Real-Time Compositional Practices of Honeysmack

Why is your research important?

Contribution to the growing practice-led research in real-time electronic dance music practices.

Supervisors:

Prof Catherine Hope (Main), Philip Brophy (External)

Samuel James Mcauliffe

Samuel James Mcauliffe

Research topic:

The Improvisational Situation: A Topography of Improvisation in Musical Performance and Philosophical Hermeneutics.

Why is your research important?

My project interrogates the nature of improvisation in musical performance and demonstrates how issues of improvisation that arise in music are relevant to philosophy. Arguing that improvisation is essential to the way in which we each are in the world, my project offers an improvisational account of music, truth, language, and ethics, which is of increasing importance in our post-modern world.

Supervisors:

Prof Catherine Hope (Main), Prof Jeff Malpas (External)

Pramantha Mohon Tagore

Pramantha Mohon Tagore

Research topic:

Narratives of Music and Modernity in Nineteenth-Century Colonial Calcutta.

Why is your research important?

My research is aimed at making inroads into diversifying the historical imagination of nineteenth-century Calcutta's musical past. By locating and documenting textual, oral, recorded and visual material, I hope to provide greater historical depth and nuance which can highlight a more diverse and creative past for music in Bengal, whilst also contributing to contemporary intercultural practice.

Supervisors:

Dr Adrian Mcneil (Main), Asst Prof Suddhaseel Sen (Extrnal-Ja)

Merophie Carr

Merophie Carr

Research topic:

Researching the relational encounters created by a slow theatre project at Footscray Train Station.

Why is your research important?

This research offers new ways to consider the impact and effects of participatory performance projects by tracking conversations and relations using a dramaturgical research framework. This research also offers advice and provocations for practitioners in the realm of slow theatre - theatre projects that are local, durational and participatory.

Supervisors:

Prof Stacy Holman Jones (Main), Dr Christopher David Cottrell (Associate)