Graduate researchers

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Elizabeth Burrell

Elizabeth Burrell

Research topic:

Invocation of the saints in the late medieval pursuit of health and wellbeing.

Why is your research important?

My thesis demonstrates the ubiquity of saints within the late medieval English healthcare apparatus by examining curative invocations that directly request their intercession. Sourcing charms and invocations from various forms of household literature, including Books of Hours, commonplace books, and recipe collections, my thesis establishes saintly healing as a significant yet understudied means to heal the entire late medieval body.

Alex Cain

Alex Cain

Research topic:

Thinking and friendship in the political theory of Hannah Arendt.

Why is your research important?

My research takes the political theory of Hannah Arendt as its point of departure to investigate the ways that our friendships facilitate our ability to think about and judge action in the world. In particular, I am interested in whether our conduct online risks a loss of friendship as a deep and intellectual engagement between human beings and whether this potential loss of friendship in turn risks our ability to think.

Nathan Cook

Nathan Cook

Research topic:

Strategies to reduce food waste in hospital food services.

Why is your research important?

Food waste has a large environmental footprint due to the greenhouse gas emissions associated with it being dumped in landfill. Hospitals produce are large amount of food waste for multiple reasons. This research is important to reduce the impact of food waste from hospitals on the environment by diverting waste from landfill through management strategies such as donation, composting and anaerobic digestion.

Andrew William Corcoran

Andrew William Corcoran

Supervisors:

Prof Jakob Hohwy (Main), Prof Vaughan Macefield (External)

Geraldine Fela

Geraldine Fela

Research topic:

My thesis draws on oral testimony and archival research to examine the response of nurses in Australia to the HIV and AIDS virus between 1983 and 1996

Why is your research important?

In the context of the Covid-19 pandemic there are important lessons to be drawn from the experiences of nurses during Australia’s HIV and AIDS crisis. This history is a reminder of the crucial role that nurses play in patient care, as well as the political capacity of nurses and nursing unionism to respond to public health emergencies.

Samiksha Goyal

Samiksha Goyal

Research topic:

Disinterest and moral inquiry.

Why is your research important?

My PhD addresses the fundamental concern about objectivity in moral theory. I investigate the implications of disinterest, self interest, and welfare for moral domain. Here I develop anew Gandhi’s concept of moral virtue. I argue for an intersection between Gandhi’s moral philosophy and the moral frame of western liberal thought. The idea is to seek the potential response from moral theory for radical social action.

Harits Althof Hasra

Harits Althof Hasra

Research topic:

Ethical theories of discrimination.

Why is your research important?

Some theories aim to give us a unified, general explanation for why discrimination is wrong. If they are right to think of discrimination in such a way, this has serious implications for how we think of issues such as statistical profiling and criminal justice.

Joshua Hatherley

Joshua Hatherley

Research topic:

Joshua's research examines the ethical implications of emerging artificial intelligence technologies in medicine and healthcare.

Why is your research important?

Recent advancements in artificial intelligence have garnered significant attention for their potential healthcare applications. Yet the implementation and use of this technology in medicine presents a long list of ethical concerns. Joshua's research aims to offer a comprehensive analysis and evaluation of these ethical challenges, along with a set of detailed recommendations for the future of AI-enabled medicine.

Courtney Hempton

Courtney Hempton

Research topic:

The biopolitics of voluntary assisted dying.

Why is your research important?

The establishment of ‘voluntary assisted dying’ in the Australian state of Victoria is a historic transformation in the state’s management of life and death. I trace the emergence of voluntary assisted dying law, policy, and practice, and draw on Michel Foucault’s account of biopolitics and technologies of the self to address questions of power, knowledge, and freedom in relation to the state’s establishment of voluntary assisted dying.

Holly Jane Buchanan Jones-Amin

Holly Jane Buchanan Jones-Amin

Supervisors:

Prof Ian Mcniven (Main), Dr Liam Brady (External), Dr Brit Asmussen (External)