Graduate researchers

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Bernard Z Keo

Bernard Z Keo

Research topic:

Decolonisation and nation-building in post-World War II Malaya and Singapore, focussing on the Peranakan Chinese of the Straits Settlements.

Why is your research important?

My research generates new understandings of a community that has largely been transformed into a cultural heritage product in contemporary Malaysia and Singapore. It also highlights one of the many alternative imaginations of the Malayan nation overshadowed by the one that achieved independence in 1957. By examining the intersections between these two topics, I problematise existing understandings of decolonisation and nation-making.

Vincent Le

Vincent Le

Research topic:

The will to critique: A machinic theory of intelligence, time and value.

Why is your research important?

My current research draws on Nietzsche, psychoanalysis (particularly Freud and Lou Salome), and Deleuze and Guattari's joint works to critique the dominant neorationalist conceptions of artificial general intelligence (as best represented by Nick Bostrom and Reza Negarestani) in favour of a new theory of AI, which also has implications for how we understand the nature of desire, time and economic value.

Jonathan Chung Yan Lo

Jonathan Chung Yan Lo

Research topic:

The sapiential hermeneutics of 13th century Franciscan theologian Bonaventure of Bagnoregio: context and development.

Why is your research important?

My research locates the specific meaning and use of his hermeneutics within the historical situation, illuminating its uniqueness and adding nuance to traditional scholarly notions of one-dimensionality or static equivalence. Over time, his hermeneutics integrated a mystical dimension that shifted his earlier dependence on metaphysics. Innovatively, it became a speculation that ‘arises from experience’ rather than ‘about’ experience.

Supervisors:

Prof Constant Mews (Main), Dr Matthew Beckmann (External)

Marvin Martin

Marvin Martin

Research topic:

German missions in Central and South Australia in the 20th century.

Why is your research important?

While the settler colonial history of English-speaking missions in Australia has been fairly well researched, few scholars have investigated German-speaking missionaries and their relationships with Indigenous peoples. By critically reading archival materials and doing ethical oral history, I will therefore examine whether European-Indigenous power relations and the agency of Indigenous peoples differed at German missions.

Pat McConville

Pat McConville

Research topic:

My dissertation, Phenomenology and Medical Devices, describes how artificial hearts and other devices might change how patients understand the world.

Why is your research important?

Phenomenology has always been well-placed to offer critical perspectives on bioethical issues. Returning the patient and the situation to the frame of reference for medical device manufacturers and technology entrepreneurs, as well as informing users and patients, should be pressing concerns for both bioethicists and philosophers of lived experience.

James Mcguire

James Mcguire

Research topic:

My thesis uses a broadly character-based moral framework to illuminate and respond to important matters concerning policing and excessive force.

Why is your research important?

My work employs a relatively neglected but valuable tradition of ethical thought to reflect on and scrutinise 21st century policing. Practical reform recommendations follow. I draw on data from the empirical sciences to substantiate my arguments and analyses, as well as insights from the fields of sociology, criminology, and legal theory. This is interdisciplinary scholarship applied to an important institution, one relevant to us all.

Robert Anthony Moseley

Robert Anthony Moseley

Supervisors:

Dr Michael Ure (Main), Prof Keith Ansell-Pearson (External-Ja)

Niccolo Negro

Niccolo Negro

Research topic:

Integrated information theory of consciousness and free energy principle.

Why is your research important?

My research seeks to investigate how consciousness (i.e. experience) can be generated by physical systems like the human brain. I focus on the Integrated Information Theory of consciousness (IIT), and I try to consider whether it is compatible with the Free Energy Principle. The result would be a clarification on (i) the status of IIT within the contemporary neuroscience of consciousness, and (ii) the relation between brain and consciousness.

Jessica O'Leary

Jessica O'Leary

Research topic:

Becoming men: Youth culture, masculinities and transcultural communication at the courts of François I and Charles V.

Why is your research important?

My research makes three key contributions to the literature: firstly, I argue that hypermasculinity was a vital component of kingship for young rulers; and secondly, other young men were necessary to provide social proof of manhood to these rulers; and thirdly, these masculinities, unique to each court, were a form of transcultural communication used by foreigners to access rulers’ social spaces and by rulers to communicate power.

Frances O'Neill

Frances O'Neill

Research topic:

A history of the match industry in England 1851-1918.

Why is your research important?

A study of the match industry in England will make a contribution to the history of commodities, labour history, and the history of occupational health in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

Ryna Ordynat

Ryna Ordynat

Research topic:

Elite British women’s albums and visual culture, 1750-1830: Family, gender and memory.

Why is your research important?

My research focuses on a collection of British elite women’s scrapbook albums, dating between 1750 and 1830, as spaces and archives where they collected and preserved many personal items: sketches, watercolour drawings, poetry, letters and personal keepsakes. My research will show what such albums can reveal to historians of this period about gender, relationships, and the preservation of knowledge, family heritage, memory and experiences.