Graduate researchers

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Kelsey Perrykkad

Kelsey Perrykkad

Research topic:

Self-cognition in autism from a predictive processing perspective.

Why is your research important?

My interdisciplinary research investigates how mismatches between what the brain expects to happen and what actually happens help to shape self-representation, especially in the domain of action. Recent accounts of autism suggest that the processing of prediction errors of this kind explain cognitive differences in autism. The goal is to better understand autism, and pave the way for new ways of reducing anxiety in an uncertain world.

Alexander J Potocnik

Alexander J Potocnik

Research topic:

History of remembrance – Soča/Isonzo battlefield and remembering of the First World War on both sides of the Italo-Slovenian border.

Why is your research important?

My research addresses war remembrance, battlefield archaeology and battlefield heritage preservation through a case study on remembrance of the Soča/Isonzo battlefield, involving an analysis of variations in remembrance across time and across shifting national boundaries and political regimes, as well as empirical research in the form of mapping and analysis of the Soča/Isonzo battlefield sites.

Anisa Puri

Anisa Puri

Research topic:

Youth migration to post-war Australia (1946-1973): An oral history.

Why is your research important?

This project examines experiences and memories of youth migration to post-war Australia. My research uncovers how age, and specifically the formative life stage of youth, critically shaped migration experiences and how migration affected experiences of post-war youth. The project also proposes a more inclusive, expansive and complex view of what constitutes Australian histories of childhood and youth, and Australian histories more broadly.

Kate Rivington

Kate Rivington

Research topic:

Transatlantic anti-slavery networks in the mid-nineteenth century.

Why is your research important?

My research illuminates previously neglected anti-slavery activists, most notably women and black activist, in order to construct a more comprehensive picture of transatlantic anti-slavery than that which currently exists.

Scott Robinson

Scott Robinson

Research topic:

My thesis considers the claim of experience in modernity through the work of Walter Benjamin, Jacques Rancière and Stanley Cavell.

Why is your research important?

My research analyses the historical concept of experience in modernity and the conceptual problem of collective experience. I work within the Kantian tradition of aesthetic experience and political egalitarianism in European. I aim to develop an account of the claim that individual experience makes on collective experience, and to develop and analyse rich descriptions of experience in all dimensions of human life.

Laura Screen

Laura Screen

Research topic:

Healing spaces and the senses in thirteenth-century Liège.

Why is your research important?

Laura is beginning a MA project which is investigating how ideas about physical and spiritual healing were understood in the diocese of Liège during the thirteenth century. This project is using a variety of sources to examine how caregiving practices were influenced by sensory interactions with different spaces, particularly in female religious communities, and aims to broaden our understanding of healthcare practices.

Maks Sipowicz

Maks Sipowicz

Research topic:

The cartesian passions in early modern England.

Why is your research important?

My doctoral research concerns the influence of the Cartesian theory of the passions on a wide range of seventeenth century British philosophers. I argue it had a profound effect on the development of moral philosophy in England.

Jenny Smith

Jenny Smith

Research topic:

The mirror as a metaphor in Elizabethan England.

Why is your research important?

The mirror was a metaphor for many things in sixteenth-century England, including vanity, truth, deception, foresight, and contemplation. Metaphor was understood then as now not just as how we express ourselves but also how we think. My research on mirrors in Elizabethan historical, spiritual, dramatic and political texts shows how one metaphor shaped social identities and perceptions in changing contexts across the period.

Nicolette Snowden

Nicolette Snowden

Research topic:

A feminist oral history of women in a rural and industrial working-class region, the Latrobe Valley, in south-eastern Australia.

Why is your research important?

My research centres the life histories of women to reveal the essential contributions they make and challenge the Latrobe Valley’s masculine post-war industrial narrative. My research illustrates the intersections in rural women’s lives including class, gender and ethnicity and how these factors shape their rural girlhoods, working lives, maternographies and later life.

Richard Tait

Richard Tait

Research topic:

The early modern Italian physician: A cultural history of professional conduct.

Why is your research important?

This work is important because it explores the cultural history of physicians at a time when they are emerging as an elite profession and fills a gap in the history of medical conduct. Doctors in the sixteenth century had high social status and were generally wealthy. I contend that their social prestige was derived, at least in part, from their professional conduct as a group, intended to set them apart as an elite.

Matthew Topp

Matthew Topp

Research topic:

'Ars oblivionalis': A study of cultural forgetting in renaissance Florence.

Why is your research important?

This thesis employes cultural forgetting as a lens to explore fifteenth-century Florentine memory culture & society more broadly, through an analysis of three case studies. Examining Florentine practices of peacemaking, exile, & ‘damnatio memoriae’, it aims to deepen our knowledge of how Florentines conceptualised ‘memory’ & ‘forgetting’, & how & why different forms of forgetting were employed for a variety of political & social purposes.

Supervisors:

A/Prof Carolyn James (Main), A/Prof Jonathan Davies (External-Ja)