Graduate researchers

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Pankaj Adhikari

Pankaj Adhikari

Research topic:

Party mandates in the world’s largest democracy: making and keeping campaign promises in India.

Why is your research important?

In representative democracies, parties are expected to fulfil their campaign promises, also known as ‘pledges’, after getting into office. My research extends the current comparative pledge study, the Comparative Party Pledges Project, to the largest representative democracy in the world by population size, India, and looks into the extent to which voters get meaningful choices between policy alternatives in election campaigns.

Md Isahaque Ali

Md Isahaque Ali

Research topic:

Older people in coastal Bangladesh: extreme weather events, social protection and vulnerability.

Why is your research important?

The research will add new knowledge in the literature on the impacts of extreme weather events on the vulnerability and resilience of older people, and the role of social protection programs to address their vulnerability in coastal Bangladesh. Besides, the results will encourage potential researchers in this field to discover in-depth answers to the problem, and policymakers will come up with ideas to reform existing policies and programs.

Uzair Amjad

Uzair Amjad

Research topic:

Disrupting masculinity: the therapeutic encounters of infertile Pakistani men.

Why is your research important?

Within the study of gender, this research project specifically analyzes the roles of institutions, cultures and individuals in constructing gender and disease. Also sheds light on our developing and limited understanding of men and masculinities particularly within the context of resource-constrained societies, and the ways preconceived gender notions inform critical life events such as reproductive health decision making.

Rosi Aryal Lees

Rosi Aryal Lees

Research topic:

Negotiating Australia's racial and sexual contracts: Nepali migrant women and the COVID-19 pandemic.

Why is your research important?

The COVID-19 pandemic has intensified and exposed racial, gender and social inequalties worldwide. My research considers how migrant women of colour in Australia, specifically Nepali temporary migrant women, have managed this intensification of structural and historical inequality, with a focus on the operation of the racial and sexual contracts in Australia intersect with post-Fordist precarity to shape migrant women's experiences.

Rachel Ngaire Banfield

Rachel Ngaire Banfield

Supervisors:

Prof Jacqui True (Main), A/Prof Sara Davies (Associate)

Nancy Bassett

Nancy Bassett

Research topic:

Exploring the role of Ngaruahine Elders as catalysts for revitalising lost culture, documenting their stories implementing Kaupapa Maori methodology.

Why is your research important?

The reported family violence statistics by Maori living in New Zealand are catastrophic. We urgently need to develop educational resources, by Maori for Maori, working collaboratively with the Elders to revitalise lost culture using tikanga and Kaupapa Maori to inform and shape government policies and framework because the current policies have failed.

Nadia Bevan

Nadia Bevan

Research topic:

The role of weight stigma and associated factors in the avoidance of physical activity and sport.

Why is your research important?

It is important to understand the role of external and internal weight stigma in avoiding exercise as physical inactivity is the fourth leading risk factor for global mortality and weight stigmatisation is prolific in a variety of settings and causes physical and mental consequences. This research will assist to develop a better understanding of sociocultural and psychological factors associated with physical activity and sport avoidance.

Prabha Bogoda Arachchige

Prabha Bogoda Arachchige

Research topic:

Australia’s “missing assets”: highly skilled migrant women’s experiences of inclusion and belonging.

Why is your research important?

Centered on Bourdieu's conceptual tools of capital, habitus and field, this study examines the complexities of the relationships between non English speaking background immigrant women’s habitus and negotiation of multiple fields. It exemplifies the complexities that highly skilled NESB women experience in the process of finding employment and settling in a new country.

Jessica Burley

Jessica Burley

Research topic:

Evaluating family violence perpetrator interventions in Victoria.

Why is your research important?

This work is important because family violence is a critical, global issue where we are constantly seeking continuous improvement in the way that we hold perpetrators to account. Currently, we are failing to keep women and children safe in their homes. We need to find ways to successfully promote long term behaviour change in perpetrators.

Ben Calo

Ben Calo

Research topic:

Terrorist recruiters and social media prosumers: the role of identity in ISIL recruitment and propaganda.

Why is your research important?

This research develops new understandings on the role of identity in ISIL recruitment and propaganda. A hybrid identity framework was developed and applied to the social media of ISIL-inspired Australian Muslim men. This research is novel in that it analysed radicalisation from the perspective of the recruited. This research also contributes to the literature on Australian Muslim identities and expands work on social media radicalisation.

Souvik Lal Chakraborty

Souvik Lal Chakraborty

Research topic:

Souvik is researching on people’s movement in India with specific focus on the eastern state of Odisha.

Why is your research important?

The proposed PhD research seeks to provide new insights into social movements in India. This research will not only provide an in-depth analysis of a specific social movement in India but will also advance our academic understanding of similar issues of social movements against mining and natural resource extraction more broadly.

Xinwei Chen

Xinwei Chen

Research topic:

Governance in China: the role of think tanks in defining policy agendas.

Why is your research important?

This research explores what role do Chinese think tanks play in the development of the policy agenda of the national government in China. It will add a new dimension to studies of Chinese politics and policymaking process. The study adapts and applies an established framework for the comparative study of policy agendas, which will enrich our understanding of China’s contemporary system of governance and complement and build the broader CAP.

Isabelle Cherkesly

Isabelle Cherkesly

Research topic:

Irish female convicts transported to Van Diemen's Land; marriage and crime in times of crisis.

Why is your research important?

My research expands the knowledge about convicts who were transported to Van Diemen's Land in the 19th century. I use data collected by the Founders and survivors project (FAS) and the Female convict research center (FCRC). Using advanced statistical modelling I am able to study trends in marriage and crime within the Irish female convict population. Moreover, by using convict descriptions I can give life to numbers and percentages.

Joseph Chitambo

Joseph Chitambo

Research topic:

Informal social control in migrant communities: a case study of South Sudanese families in Melbourne.

Why is your research important?

This project will make theoretical contributions on the intersection of neighbourhood life, parenting, and unwanted youth behaviours for humanitarian migrant families. The project will also contribute to the advancement of the knowledge base on the socialisation and control of children and young people among migrant families who encounter adverse experiences before, during and after the settlement process.

Peter Anthony Clay

Peter Anthony Clay

Supervisors:

A/Prof Victoria Peel (Main), Dr Meead Saberi (Associate)

Ananya Dasgupta

Ananya Dasgupta

Supervisors:

Dr Michael Ure (Main), A/Prof Siby George (External)

Nedha de Silva

Nedha de Silva

Research topic:

State induced structural violence and women’s security: the non-regulation of microfinance in post-war Sri Lanka.

Why is your research important?

Using a feminist political economy perspective, my research explores how state encouraged post-war economic development strategies affect the everyday lives of women.

Charles Antony Diab

Charles Antony Diab

Research topic:

How does CSR enacted at the MNC subsidiary in a developing country (UAE) vary from how CSR is enacted at the MNC headquarter in developed country?

Why is your research important?

This research is important because it will provide MNC decision-makers, who have subsidiaries in developing countries, a valuable guide to understanding how institutional pressures affect CSR decision-making and an analytical framework to better understand how to target and develop effective CSR engagement with stakeholders.