National Energy and Climate Plans for the Island of Ireland: Wind Curtailment, Interconnectors and Storage

05/5/2021 05:00 pm 05/5/2021 06:00 pm Australia/Melbourne National Energy and Climate Plans for the Island of Ireland: Wind Curtailment, Interconnectors and Storage

Managing the curtailment of wind-powered generation in Ireland involves a trade-off between investment in storage or transmission. This webinar will explore these options and the relative costs of different strategies to deal with a high penetration of variable renewable electricity. This talk will provide valuable insights, as renewable energies play an increasingly important role in the Australian electricity market.

Abstract

Member States [of the EU] have published National Energy and Climate Plans with challenging variable  renewable electricity (VRE) targets. As VRE has a high peak to average output, the Single Electricity Market of the island of Ireland (SEM) will need to consider how best to balance the lost value of curtailment against the extra costs of higher Simultaneous Non-Synchronous Penetration (SNSP), more interconnector capacity and/or more storage. The paper develops a spreadsheet model to explore these options for the 2026 VRE targets in the SEM and her neighbours. Raising SNSP from 75% to 85% reduces curtailment from 13.3% to 8.1%, saving 1,338 GWh/yr of spilled wind. Adding the Celtic Link of 700 MW at SNSP of 75% reduces curtailment to 12.4% and saves 235 GWh. Adding 100 MW of batteries saves 17 GWh/yr. The marginal spilled wind can be four times the average, creating a potentially significant market distortion. Read the paper here.

Speaker

Emeritus Professor David Newbery, University of Cambridge

Professor David Newbery, CBE, FBA, is the Director of the Cambridge Energy Policy Research Group (EPRG), an Emeritus Professor of Economics at the Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge, and a Professorial Research Associate in the UCL Bartlett School of Environment, Energy and Resources, University College London. He was educated at Cambridge with undergraduate degrees in Mathematics and Economics, and received a PhD and ScD in economics also from Cambridge. He is a Fellow of the British Academy and of the Econometric Society. He is Vice-Chairman of Cambridge Economic Policy Associates and has been an occasional consultant to the World Bank, Ofgem, Ofwat, and ORR, a former member of the Competition Commission, former chairman of the Dutch electricity Market Surveillance Committee and a former member of DECC’s Panel of Technical Experts on the Capacity Market. He is a member of Ofgem’s Gas Network Innovation Competition and an Independent Member of the Single Electricity Market Committee of the island of Ireland.

Event host

Associate Professor Guillaume Roger, Centre for Global Business (CGB), Monash Business School

A/Professor Roger is the founder and coordinator of the Australian Energy Markets Initiative (AEMI), which was introduced by CGB to spur academic research, policy formulation and industry engagement in the electricity sector in Australia. Guillaume also holds appointments as an Associate Director of the Monash Energy Institute and a Co-Director of the Grid Innovation Hub. His research focuses on incentive design and dynamic contracts under moral hazard and has been published in top field journals in economic theory.

Organised by

Centre for Global Business’ (CGB) Australian Energy Market Initiative (AEMI) (Monash Business School)

Monash Energy Institute (MEI)

Register now

Register via Zoom

Event Details

Date:
5 May 2021 at 5:00 pm – 6:00 pm
Venue:
Online - Melbourne time
Categories:
Global Business; Australian Electricity Market Initiative 

Description

Managing the curtailment of wind-powered generation in Ireland involves a trade-off between investment in storage or transmission. This webinar will explore these options and the relative costs of different strategies to deal with a high penetration of variable renewable electricity. This talk will provide valuable insights, as renewable energies play an increasingly important role in the Australian electricity market.

Abstract

Member States [of the EU] have published National Energy and Climate Plans with challenging variable  renewable electricity (VRE) targets. As VRE has a high peak to average output, the Single Electricity Market of the island of Ireland (SEM) will need to consider how best to balance the lost value of curtailment against the extra costs of higher Simultaneous Non-Synchronous Penetration (SNSP), more interconnector capacity and/or more storage. The paper develops a spreadsheet model to explore these options for the 2026 VRE targets in the SEM and her neighbours. Raising SNSP from 75% to 85% reduces curtailment from 13.3% to 8.1%, saving 1,338 GWh/yr of spilled wind. Adding the Celtic Link of 700 MW at SNSP of 75% reduces curtailment to 12.4% and saves 235 GWh. Adding 100 MW of batteries saves 17 GWh/yr. The marginal spilled wind can be four times the average, creating a potentially significant market distortion. Read the paper here.

Speaker

Emeritus Professor David Newbery, University of Cambridge

Professor David Newbery, CBE, FBA, is the Director of the Cambridge Energy Policy Research Group (EPRG), an Emeritus Professor of Economics at the Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge, and a Professorial Research Associate in the UCL Bartlett School of Environment, Energy and Resources, University College London. He was educated at Cambridge with undergraduate degrees in Mathematics and Economics, and received a PhD and ScD in economics also from Cambridge. He is a Fellow of the British Academy and of the Econometric Society. He is Vice-Chairman of Cambridge Economic Policy Associates and has been an occasional consultant to the World Bank, Ofgem, Ofwat, and ORR, a former member of the Competition Commission, former chairman of the Dutch electricity Market Surveillance Committee and a former member of DECC’s Panel of Technical Experts on the Capacity Market. He is a member of Ofgem’s Gas Network Innovation Competition and an Independent Member of the Single Electricity Market Committee of the island of Ireland.

Event host

Associate Professor Guillaume Roger, Centre for Global Business (CGB), Monash Business School

A/Professor Roger is the founder and coordinator of the Australian Energy Markets Initiative (AEMI), which was introduced by CGB to spur academic research, policy formulation and industry engagement in the electricity sector in Australia. Guillaume also holds appointments as an Associate Director of the Monash Energy Institute and a Co-Director of the Grid Innovation Hub. His research focuses on incentive design and dynamic contracts under moral hazard and has been published in top field journals in economic theory.

Organised by

Centre for Global Business’ (CGB) Australian Energy Market Initiative (AEMI) (Monash Business School)

Monash Energy Institute (MEI)

Register now

Register via Zoom