One-Day International Research Symposium

04/11/2019 09:00 am 04/11/2019 05:30 pm Australia/Melbourne One-Day International Research Symposium

The International Consortium for Research in Employment and Work (iCREW) and Ethical Regulation Research Network (ERRN), Centre for Global Business, Monash Business School in collaboration with Australian HR Institute (AHRI) and School of Labor Relations and Human Resources, Renmin University of China, present a one-day international research symposium:

'Digitalisation, Artificial Intelligence and Gig Jobs: Implications for The Future of Business, Employment, Regulation and Work, in a Global Economy'

This topical symposium will focus on the impact of digitalisation, artificial intelligence (AI) and gig jobs on the future of employment, employability, industrial relations, work and labour regulation across different economic, industrial and occupational settings.

We will bring together leading researchers and practitioners in employment relations, HR and labour regulation from Australia, China, the United Kingdom and other countries. They will discuss the latest developments in the application of digital technology, AI and algorithmic decision-making by employers and how these impact skills, work, employment relations and labour regulation in the Asia-Pacific region, Europe and beyond, including national regulations and practices, international influences, as well as global trends, challenges and lessons.

Registration

Advance registration is essential; space is limited, so register soon if you wish to participate.

  • $40 AHRI Members or Monash University staff/students*
  • $20 full time students, unwaged or retirees
  • $50 others

* To register with the special Monash discount, use the code MON40.

Register today

Speakers

    Lyn Goodear is the Chief Executive Officer of the Australian HR Institute, and was appointed to the role in December 2012. Lyn champions the standards of HR practice in Australia and is responsible for leading the change that AHRI is overseeing as it relates to building HR capability for the future workforce in areas such as productivity and sustainability, as well as cultivating workplace cultures that are inclusive, diverse and ethical. In addition to representing AHRI on numerous local, state and national committees and advisory panels, Lyn held the role of Secretary General and Treasurer of the Asia Pacific Federation of Human Resources (Sept 2012 to Nov 2017), and in March 2019, was appointed the first representative for Australia to APFHRM. Lyn was formerly National Manager, Professional Development at AHRI (2005 to 2012). Prior to this, Lyn held leadership and management roles within the education sector at Southwest Institute of TAFE and Deakin Australia, in addition to holding accounting roles within the mining and engineering industries located in the United States and Australia. Within her career she has also managed her own consulting small business, and from 2017 – 2019, was appointed as a non-executive director of the Council of Small Business Australia (COSBOA).


    Professor Greg J. Bamber is a Professor, Monash Business School, Monash University. He has more than 200 publications, for example, in such journals as: British Journal of Industrial Relations; British Journal of Management; Human Relations; Human Resource Management Journal; Industrial & Labor Relations Review; International Journal of Human Resource Management; Journal of Management Studies; New Technology, Work and Employment; Public Administration; and books such as: International & Comparative Employment Relations, SAGE; Up in the Air: How Airlines Can Improve Performance by Engaging their Employees, Cornell UP; New Technology: International Perspectives on Human Resources and Industrial Relations, Routledge. He has won many research grants and has served as an assessor for research councils that evaluate grant applications in Australia and internationally. He has led many research projects, including on: airlines, hospitals, manufacturing, telecommunications; outsourcing, dispute settlement, workplace change. He has conducted projects for governments and international agencies. He is a Fellow of AHRI and other institutes. He has served as President of: Association of Industrial Relations Academics of Australia & New Zealand; Australian & New Zealand Academy of Management; International Federation of Scholarly Associations of Management and of other organisations. Harvard University and Massachusetts Institute of Technology and other universities have invited him to serve as a guest faculty member.

    Title: Digitalisation and other new technologies: What is the future of work

    Abstract: To what extent does the introduction of digitalisation and other new technologies in different contexts lead to pre-determined outcomes? These remarks will consider various contexts, managerial strategies, styles of human resources management, employment, industrial relations, social dialogue and work organization that may help to shape the future of work and the outcomes of technological change.


    Professor Weiguo Yang is Dean of Labor and Human Resources of Renmin University of China and Director of the China Institute of Human Capital Audit. He also is vice-president of China Labor Economic Association and director of Human Capital Services Branch of China Human Resources Development Association. He attained substantial experience in macro and micro labor and human resources management through working for central government, private, state-owned and joint ventures from 1991 to 1998. After he obtained his PhD in Economics from the Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences in 2000, he started working as a researcher, and joined Renmin University of China in 2003. His research areas include digital economy and work market, human capital services, labor and employment policy, strategic human capital management, and human resource auditing. Since the year 2000, he has been conducting research and providing consulting for central and local governments, different forms of companies as well as international institutions. He was also Humphrey Fellow at Penn State University, and Senior Visiting Scholar at Darwin College of Cambridge University.


    Jimmy Donaghey is Professor in the Department of Management at Monash Business School, having joined in April 2019. Prior to joining Monash, he was Professor at the University of Warwick, UK, where he was a member of both the Industrial Relations Research Unit and Organisation and HRM group. Prior to Warwick, he worked at Queen’s University Belfast, from where he also obtained his PhD. His research interests lie in three overlapping areas: employment relations in global supply chains; worker voice; and transnational governance. In addition to his academic interests, Jimmy played an active role in the UK’s University and College Union at branch and national level, including a period as national Vice-chair of the Higher Education sector.


    Michael Brookes is Professor of Work and Employment at the University of Hertfordshire, UK, and Research Associate at Nelson Mandela University, South Africa as well as a Director of the Khanyisa Project, a non-profit partnership seeking to address employability issues in the Eastern Cape of South Africa. His research interests include comparative employment relations, international HRM and labour economics, with the central strand connecting all aspects of this research being to explore the relationship between national institutional configurations and firm level work and employment practices.

    Title: ‘The impact of platform work upon employment, employability and employment relations as well as its potential contribution to the community wealth building agenda’

    Abstract: The growth of platform-based approaches to organising tasks, utilised by Uber, Deliveroo, etc., has been well documented in the literature as has the related impact upon precarity, the nature of employment as well as the employment relationship. This paper seeks to explore the potential for delivering more favourable outcomes for platform-dependent employees, as well as for the wider society, as a result of integrating platform-based methods of organising work activities at the municipal level as part of a comprehensive and integrated approach to promoting and sustaining community wealth building.


    Dr Josh Healy is a Senior Research Fellow in the Centre for Workplace Leadership (CWL) at the University of Melbourne. He is one of Australia’s leading researchers and commentators on the future of work. Dr Healy studies, and engages actively in public debates about, many aspects of work and the changing labour market, including new technologies, workforce ageing, and the gig economy. His recent contributions on these topics include major reports, influential academic articles, editorial roles, media commentary, undergraduate teaching and event organisation. Dr Healy’s earlier publications deal with minimum wages, skill shortages, new immigrants’ labour market experiences.


    Dr Andreas Pekarek is a Lecturer in the Department of Management and Marketing at the University of Melbourne. He holds a PhD from Monash University. Andreas has published in such journals as The British Journal of Industrial Relations, Industrial Relations Journal, Journal of Industrial Relations, Industrial and Labor Relations Review and European Journal of Industrial Relations. His research focuses on unions and worker representation, collective bargaining, occupations and professions, and interdisciplinary and comparative approaches to work, HRM, and industrial relations.

    Title: 'Consumers and work in the gig economy: Dead end or High Road?'

    Abstract: The gig economy continues to attract strong academic and popular attention. While researchers have begun to explore the conditions of work in the gig economy and the responses from unions and governments, attempts have not yet been made to systematically study consumers’ views. We argue that if significant progress is to be made in shifting gig work away from its more problematic qualities, consumer sentiments must be understood and leveraged. Drawing on a unique Australian public opinion dataset, we explore consumers’ engagement with and attitudes towards the gig economy, as a basis for enriching the debate about how gig work conditions could be improved. We situate our findings within the literature on High Road employment practices, and attempt for the first time to apply this influential framework to the gig economy.


    Professor Michelle Welsh is Head of Department of Business Law and Taxation and Coordinator of Ethical Regulation Research Network, Centre for Global Business, Monash Business School. Michelle undertakes research and supervision in the area of corporate law, corporate regulation, enforcement and compliance. Michelle has published her research in leading Australian corporate law journals and a number of international journals. She was a chief investigator on an ARC Discovery Project with colleagues from the Melbourne Law School on a project entitled ‘Phoenix Activity: Regulating Fraudulent Use of the Corporate Form’ (2014-2016). Michelle has been invited to present her research at national and international workshops and conferences including the Hartnell Colloquium at the ANU in 2011 and the Fairness in Financial Services Workshop at UBC in Vancouver in 2012. She has presented seminars by invitation at the Australian Securities and Investments Commission, the University of Michigan, the Law Society of Hong Kong, the Hong Kong Institute of Chartered Secretaries and the Hong Kong Securities and Futures Commission.


    Geoff McGill, Adjunct Associate Professor, Monash Business School,has held senior executive roles in the Australian Public Service (APS), the resources sector, banking and finance. The focus of these roles has been primarily on workplace and cultural change and the policies and systems to implement and sustain major improvements in performance and behaviour at the national, enterprise and workplace level. In the APS the focus was on national policies to support industrial relations and workplace reform and in the private sector as a thought leader and advisor on the development of enterprise bargaining, employee engagement and labour market reform. Geoff has worked at the International Labour Organisation (ILO, Geneva), in New Zealand, UK, North and South America and the Middle East. Since establishing his own consultancy in 2005, he has been engaged in the mining and resources sector, heavy manufacturing, infrastructure, government, the judicial system and not for profit organisations. This work has included advice on employee relations strategy, organisation structure, systems design, leadership development and cultural change. His consulting practice has helped to add value to his former role at the Workplace Research Centre, Sydney University and current role as Adjunct Associate Professor (Practice) at the International Consortium for Research in Employment and Work (iCREW), Centre for Global Business, Monash University.

    Title: 'The future of work through the lens of Systems Leadership Theory'

    Abstract: Systems leadership theory posits that a cohesive culture is formed when people share mythologies (assumptions and beliefs) that a particular behaviour demonstrates positive or negative values. Work, or the absence of work, will be viewed positively or negatively depending on the mythologies of the social group making that judgment. Systems leadership theory defines work as “the turning of intention into reality". It provides a different perspective on what work is and the future of work. It raises fundamental questions about how work is recognised and rewarded and the importance of understanding the culture (shared mythologies) within which social and political policy responses are framed.


    Dr Catrina Denvir is a Senior Lecturer at the Department of Business Law and Taxation, Monash Business School, Monash University. She joined Monash from Ulster University where she Directed the Legal Innovation Centre - a joint initiative between the School of Law and the School of Computer Science and Intelligent Systems. The research Catrina conducts is inherently interdisciplinary and engages issues relevant to law, technology, legal services, legal education (public and professional), ethics, sociology, psychology (behaviour) and public policy. She has published widely on the subjects of: technological innovation in the legal profession; the role of law in everyday life; public understanding of the law; design of legal services; access to justice; industrial action, and; research methodology. She has a keen interest in applying methodologies from other fields, to the study of the law and has expertise in a broad range of qualitative and quantitative research methodologies, including: the development and implementation of cutting edge methods of data collection; experimental designs; innovative use of legal service administrative data; large-scale longitudinal and cross-sectional ‘legal need’ survey research; in-depth qualitative work on ethics and industrial action; methods employing virtual avatars; as well as complex multilevel statistical modelling of survey data.

    Title: 'From Robo-Resistance to Robo-Lawyer: The Impact of Digital Transformation on the Legal Profession'

    Abstract: What was once characterised as a relatively stable profession, unfettered by the influence of modernity and strongly resistant to external forces, the legal services sector has in recent years exhibited marked change. Key among these changes has been the profession’s growing receptiveness to digital technologies. In an environment of heightened competition brought about by deregulation, public spending funding cuts, changing client expectations, the emergence of unbundled legal services and new models of legal service delivery, technology has increasingly found its way into legal practice via commercially available software aimed at making the completion of high volume, repetitive tasks more efficient. Drawing on the response exhibited by a number of large international law firms, in this presentation I explore the impact of digitization on the delivery and organization of legal services. Looking beyond the familiar trope of ‘professional protectionism’, I explain the (allegedly) slow rate of technology adoption in law with reference to the features that distinguish the legal profession from that of other industries such as finance and banking. Finally, I consider the issues most likely to define the digitization agenda over the coming years, and the impact of change on employment practices within the legal sector.


    Professor Chongwoo Choe is Director of Centre for Global Business and Professor of Economics, Monash Business School, Monash University. Prior to joining Monash University in 2007, he worked at the Australian Graduate School of Management (UNSW) and La Trobe University. He also held visiting professorship at the University of Tokyo and Osaka University. He holds a PhD in economics from the University of Minnesota. His primary research interest is in what firms do both within and outside their organisational boundaries, spanning most disciplinary areas taught and researched at Monash Business School. His research has been published widely in major journals in economics, finance and management. His research has attracted considerable research funding both in Australia and overseas, including a number of ARC grants. His current research is in big data analytics, dynamic pricing and online privacy.


    Dr Kai Liu is an Associate Professor at the School of Labor and Human Resources, Renmin University of China, Beijing. His areas of expertise lie in health policy and social policy in developing countries. He obtained his PhD from The Chinese University of Hong Kong in 2015. With a Fulbright Scholarship he conducted a comparative study of health care systems at Harvard University from 2014 to 2015. As a social policy researcher he has conducted systematic analyses of health insurance, health equity, and poverty in developing countries. Lately he has been analyzing multi-level health policy implementation in China using big data.

    Title: 'Effect of workers’ involvement into the sharing economy on their enrolment in social insurance programs: Evidence from China'

    Abstract: The sharing economy is exploding and brings about a quite new working style. The emergence of crowd working transforms employment relations to work relations. This change is a big challenge to social insurance system that is organized based on employment and formal contract. However, little empirical evidence is known about the real effect of the sharing economy on social insurance system. Using a survey data collected in a food delivery platform, we examined the effects of the degree of workers’ involvement into the sharing economy on their enrollment and willingness of enrolling in social insurance programs in China. We found that the degree of involvement into the sharing economy predicts lower likelihood of enrolling in insurance, but higher enrolling willingness. Worker’s hukou significantly moderates the above relationships. Those from rural areas became the least likely to enroll and to be willing to enroll in social insurance. The eligibility of social insurance needs to be reformed by considering worker’s work transaction instead of employment status only. The reform of social insurance system should also pay attention to the rural-urban dichotomy in the era of the sharing economy.


    Liqiu Zhao is an Associate Professor at the School of Labor and Human Resources, Renmin University of China. She obtained her PhD in Economics from Katholieke Universiteit Leuven in 2012. Her research of field includes human capital development, labor market policies and institutions, and migration. Currently she has been working on the construction of preschools and human capital development in China.


    Nanfeng Luo is an Associate Professor at the School of Labor and Human Resources, Renmin University of China. He gained his PhD in Management from University of New South Wales, Australia. His research interests primarily fall in the areas of organizational theory, strategic HRM, and corporate social responsibility. His research appears in the outlets such as Journal of Management Studies, Academy of Management Perspectives, and Journal of business Ethics. He currently serves on the editorial board of Asia Pacific Journal of Management.

    Title: 'Are there returns to experience for gig workers: Evidence from food delivery riders in China'

    Abstract: The flexibility of employment is the largest benefits of gig economy. Gig jobs are usually temporary or project-based. This study aims to examine whether experience accumulation is valuable to the workers in gig economy. Using data of a large number of the delivery riders from Meituan-Dianping, which is the world's largest online and on-demand delivery platform, we find that the experience of delivery riders is positively associated with monthly income and total number of deliveries within a month. Specifically, an additional month of experience increases the total number of deliveries of delivery riders by approximately 3.7 percent. Moreover, experience significantly decreases the average time for delivery and thus increases punctuality rate. Experienced riders have a significantly higher share of deliveries during lunch shift and lower share of deliveries during dinner shift. The results imply that providing more protection for workers in the gig economy may improve worker productivity through increased experience on the platform. The short-term engagements of gig workers may result in reduced accumulation of experience, which tends to harm worker productivity.


    Geoffrey Wood is Dean and Professor of International Business, at Essex Business School. Previously he was Professor of International Business at Warwick Business School, UK. He will be moving to the University of Western Ontario, Canada in July 2019, to become the DanCap Chair of Innovation, and Head of DAN Management. He has authored/co-authored/edited eighteen books, and more than 170 articles in peer-reviewed journals. He holds honorary positions at Griffith and Monash University in Australia, and Witwatersrand and Nelson Mandela Universities in South Africa. He is Co-Editor-in-Chief of the British Journal of Management, a Journal of the British Academy of Management (BAM). He is Co-Editor of the Annals of Corporate Governance and Associate Editor of Academy of Management Perspectives, a journal of the (US) Academy of Management. He is also Co-Editor of the UK’s Chartered Association of Business Schools Academic Journal Guide and was appointed to review the Australian Business Deans Council (ABDC) Journal List. He has had numerous research grants, including funding councils (e.g. ESRC), government departments (e.g. US Department of Labor; UK Department of Work and Pensions), charities (e.g. Nuffield Foundation), the labour movement (e.g. the ITF) and the European Union.

    Title: ‘Events beyond existing experience and the firm’

    Abstract: There are a number of high probability events, which fall beyond the existing framework of historical understanding. This would include events such as global warming effects on a scale that involve the moving of a mega city, its firms and people, the collapse of antibiotic effectiveness, the shift of one of the major liberal market economies to authoritarian rule, etc.   There is also the challenge of renewed economic crisis, and the long-term effects of the present energy region on industries and nations. There is further a widespread view that technological advances may undermine the scale and scope of decent employment and fuel the rise of insecure and gig working. How are all these events inter-related? And, what does this really mean for the nature of work and employment, both within and between distinct varieties of capitalism? This talk explores these interlinkages, taking a long historical view.


    Dr Marjorie Jerrard is a Senior Lecturer the Faculty of Business and Economics at Monash University. Marjorie holds a PhD in trade union strategy in the meat industry from Monash University, awarded in 2005, a Masters of Arts (Ancient History) from the University of Queensland and a Graduate Diploma in Industrial Relations from the Queensland University of Technology. Trade union effectiveness and strategy; union-community alliances; trade unions and environmental issues and politics; industrial relations and human resource management in the Australian and New Zealand meat processing industries; diversity management and industrial relations.


    Peter Turnbull is Professor of Management & Industrial Relations in the School of Economics, Finance & Management, University of Bristol. He previously held posts at the Universities of Cardiff, Leeds, Warwick and the London School of Economics, and visiting posts at the Universities of Queen’s (Northern Ireland), Cornell (USA), and La Trobe, Melbourne, Monash and RMIT (Australia). His research focuses on the European transport sector (specifically civil aviation, maritime and ports, inland waterways, and road transport) and the impact of transport (de)regulation on employment, industrial relations and HRM. Professor Turnbull is an Academic Fellow of the Chartered Institute of Personnel & Development (CIPD) and a member of the Advisory, Conciliation & Arbitration Service (ACAS) Arbitration Panel.

    Title: 'The Menace of an Open Market in a Digital Age: Capital and Labour Mobility in the European Union (EU)'

    Abstract: The only universal ‘law’ of industrial relations – attributed to John Commons – is that union organisation and collective bargaining tends to follow the contours or boundaries of the market, certainly from the local to the national but not, it seems, the international. For Commons, conflict over changes to the market, what he called the ‘menace of competition’, was both internal (within the existing market) and external (cheap producers abroad). With an ever-widening area of political control, ‘these external menaces become internal, and it is this moving frontier that determines the scope and character of protective organization and protective legislation’ (J.R. Commons, Quarterly Journal of Economics, 1909, p.78). In Europe, political control of the single market has failed to protect the wages and working conditions of transport workers. An open market characterized by the ‘freedom of establishment’ and the ‘freedom to provide services’ has created unprecedented opportunities for new digital business strategies and employment practices, and both ‘protective organizations’ (e.g. trade unions and employers’ associations) and legislation (the European ‘social agenda’) is found to be seriously wanting.


    Tim Lyons is a Research Fellow at progressive think-tank Per Capita and Deputy Chairman of large Industry Superannuation Fund. He is co-Director of Reveille Strategy which works with unions and non-governmental organisations (NGOs) on organising, campaigning, technology, strategy and governance in Australia, New Zealand and the United States. Tim was a union official for more than twenty years, including seven years as Assistant Secretary of the Australian Council of Trade Unions (ACTU) where he was responsible for organising programs and led the work program on labour law, economics and pensions.

    Title: ‘What is the organising potential of AI for workers and unions?’

    Abstract: Using a real example in current use in Australia and the US, the author will examine how AI has the potential to scale industrial relations advice in a way that dramatically lowers the barriers for a worker to interact with a union or other labour organisation and which helps deal with cost disease. Coupled with a program to create online communities and a targeted online to offline organising program, the author makes the case that unions can use AI to help drive the development of a new and different cohort activists, new forms or organisation, secure an existing organised base and outreach to large un-organised sections of the workforce.


    Fang Lee Cooke is Associate Dean (Graduate Research) and Professor of Human Resource Management (HRM) and Asia Studies at Monash Business School, Monash University. She is also a Fellow of the Academy of the Social Sciences in Australia. Previously, she was a full professor (since 2005) at Manchester Business School, University of Manchester, UK. Fang’s recent research projects include: Chinese firms in Africa and their employment/HRM practices and labour relations; employee resilience, HRM practices and engagement in the finance sector in the Asian region; the evolution of industrial relations and implications for foreign firms in South Asia; organizational practices and management models in the care sector; HRM in the care sector, including healthcare, aged care and disability care; and digitalization and implications for skill, employment and HRM.

    Title: Digitalisation and decent work: Implications for Pacific Island Countries’

    Abstract: The increasing pace of digitalisation and the adoption of digital technology by employers in different parts of the world has led to some significant changes in the way employment and work is organised, with potentially serious implications for skill requirements, labour standards and workers’ wellbeing. These changes are not only displacing jobs but also creating new jobs, new skill requirements and new ways of working, which have profound implications for human capital development, business strategy at the organisational and industrial level, and the organisation of workers. These developments also raise fundamental questions for government policy; employer associations; and trade unions. In 2017, ILO initiated ‘The Future of Work We Want: A Global Dialogue’, which draws our attention to the question of what kind of future work we want against a context of digitalisation and robotisation at workplaces. Building on this momentum, this study (in progress) examines implications of digitalisation for decent work in its Pacific constituent countries. The study aims to assess digital readiness and understand key stakeholders’ views on how digitalisation is affecting their businesses and nation states. It analyses the current situation in the Pacific and provide policy and practical recommendations.


    Professor Simon Wilkie is Dean, Faculty of Business and Economics, and Head, Monash Business School. He has a PhD and MA in Economics from the University of Rochester, and a BComm (Hons) with first class honours in Economics from the University of New South Wales. His research has particularly focused on game theory, its application to business strategy, economic and regulatory policy design, and the economics of the communications industries. With an exceptional record for advancing multi-disciplinary collaborative research and leveraging its potential to transform policy and create lasting impact, Professor Wilkie is widely published on the subjects of spectrum auctions, game theory and telecommunications regulation in leading scholarly journals. He is a member of the editorial board of the International Journal of Communication and a former member of the editorial board of the Journal of Public Economic Theory. Professor Wilkie’s career spans a remarkable array of roles that extend beyond the higher education sphere, including appointments as Chief Economic Policy Strategist at Microsoft Corporation and Chief Economist with the US Federal Communications Commission. He joined Monash University in January this year from the University of Southern California (USC), where he was Professor of Economics in the Department of Economics, and Professor of Economics, Communication and Law in the USC Gould School of Law. He was previously head of USC’s Department of Economics and the USC Center for Communication Law and Policy.

    Title: ‘Digital transformation and global markets’

    Abstract: The digital transformation is bringing many new challenges and opportunities, at a pace not seen for more than a century. This disruption is largely being fuelled by inexpensive connected devices, wireless technologies, cloud computing, and artificial intelligence. Estimates for the speed and scale of the transformation suggest that by 2020 there will be 34 billion devices connected to the internet, generating 44 zettabytes (billion terabytes) of data. Companies and countries that successfully navigate this storm of disruption will embrace artificial intelligence while emphasising human creativity, develop nimble teams, be data driven, and create new markets that both replace existing institutions and enable innovative new products and services that are impossible today. This session will examine some of the profound changes that will affect critical areas of metrics, markets, organisations and jobs.


    Please note, the speakers and/or topics may be updated.

    Contact

    iCREW Co-Directors/Symposium co-hosts: Professors Greg J. Bamber and Fang Lee Cooke

    Symposium logistics AHRI team: andrew.whyte@ahri.com.au, cpdevents@ahri.com.au

Event Details

Date:
11 April 2019 at 9:00 am – 5:30 pm
Venue:
AHRI, Level 4, 575 Bourke Street, Melbourne, 3000
Categories:
Management; Global Business

Description

The International Consortium for Research in Employment and Work (iCREW) and Ethical Regulation Research Network (ERRN), Centre for Global Business, Monash Business School in collaboration with Australian HR Institute (AHRI) and School of Labor Relations and Human Resources, Renmin University of China, present a one-day international research symposium:

'Digitalisation, Artificial Intelligence and Gig Jobs: Implications for The Future of Business, Employment, Regulation and Work, in a Global Economy'

This topical symposium will focus on the impact of digitalisation, artificial intelligence (AI) and gig jobs on the future of employment, employability, industrial relations, work and labour regulation across different economic, industrial and occupational settings.

We will bring together leading researchers and practitioners in employment relations, HR and labour regulation from Australia, China, the United Kingdom and other countries. They will discuss the latest developments in the application of digital technology, AI and algorithmic decision-making by employers and how these impact skills, work, employment relations and labour regulation in the Asia-Pacific region, Europe and beyond, including national regulations and practices, international influences, as well as global trends, challenges and lessons.

Registration

Advance registration is essential; space is limited, so register soon if you wish to participate.

  • $40 AHRI Members or Monash University staff/students*
  • $20 full time students, unwaged or retirees
  • $50 others

* To register with the special Monash discount, use the code MON40.

Register today

Speakers

    Lyn Goodear is the Chief Executive Officer of the Australian HR Institute, and was appointed to the role in December 2012. Lyn champions the standards of HR practice in Australia and is responsible for leading the change that AHRI is overseeing as it relates to building HR capability for the future workforce in areas such as productivity and sustainability, as well as cultivating workplace cultures that are inclusive, diverse and ethical. In addition to representing AHRI on numerous local, state and national committees and advisory panels, Lyn held the role of Secretary General and Treasurer of the Asia Pacific Federation of Human Resources (Sept 2012 to Nov 2017), and in March 2019, was appointed the first representative for Australia to APFHRM. Lyn was formerly National Manager, Professional Development at AHRI (2005 to 2012). Prior to this, Lyn held leadership and management roles within the education sector at Southwest Institute of TAFE and Deakin Australia, in addition to holding accounting roles within the mining and engineering industries located in the United States and Australia. Within her career she has also managed her own consulting small business, and from 2017 – 2019, was appointed as a non-executive director of the Council of Small Business Australia (COSBOA).


    Professor Greg J. Bamber is a Professor, Monash Business School, Monash University. He has more than 200 publications, for example, in such journals as: British Journal of Industrial Relations; British Journal of Management; Human Relations; Human Resource Management Journal; Industrial & Labor Relations Review; International Journal of Human Resource Management; Journal of Management Studies; New Technology, Work and Employment; Public Administration; and books such as: International & Comparative Employment Relations, SAGE; Up in the Air: How Airlines Can Improve Performance by Engaging their Employees, Cornell UP; New Technology: International Perspectives on Human Resources and Industrial Relations, Routledge. He has won many research grants and has served as an assessor for research councils that evaluate grant applications in Australia and internationally. He has led many research projects, including on: airlines, hospitals, manufacturing, telecommunications; outsourcing, dispute settlement, workplace change. He has conducted projects for governments and international agencies. He is a Fellow of AHRI and other institutes. He has served as President of: Association of Industrial Relations Academics of Australia & New Zealand; Australian & New Zealand Academy of Management; International Federation of Scholarly Associations of Management and of other organisations. Harvard University and Massachusetts Institute of Technology and other universities have invited him to serve as a guest faculty member.

    Title: Digitalisation and other new technologies: What is the future of work

    Abstract: To what extent does the introduction of digitalisation and other new technologies in different contexts lead to pre-determined outcomes? These remarks will consider various contexts, managerial strategies, styles of human resources management, employment, industrial relations, social dialogue and work organization that may help to shape the future of work and the outcomes of technological change.


    Professor Weiguo Yang is Dean of Labor and Human Resources of Renmin University of China and Director of the China Institute of Human Capital Audit. He also is vice-president of China Labor Economic Association and director of Human Capital Services Branch of China Human Resources Development Association. He attained substantial experience in macro and micro labor and human resources management through working for central government, private, state-owned and joint ventures from 1991 to 1998. After he obtained his PhD in Economics from the Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences in 2000, he started working as a researcher, and joined Renmin University of China in 2003. His research areas include digital economy and work market, human capital services, labor and employment policy, strategic human capital management, and human resource auditing. Since the year 2000, he has been conducting research and providing consulting for central and local governments, different forms of companies as well as international institutions. He was also Humphrey Fellow at Penn State University, and Senior Visiting Scholar at Darwin College of Cambridge University.


    Jimmy Donaghey is Professor in the Department of Management at Monash Business School, having joined in April 2019. Prior to joining Monash, he was Professor at the University of Warwick, UK, where he was a member of both the Industrial Relations Research Unit and Organisation and HRM group. Prior to Warwick, he worked at Queen’s University Belfast, from where he also obtained his PhD. His research interests lie in three overlapping areas: employment relations in global supply chains; worker voice; and transnational governance. In addition to his academic interests, Jimmy played an active role in the UK’s University and College Union at branch and national level, including a period as national Vice-chair of the Higher Education sector.


    Michael Brookes is Professor of Work and Employment at the University of Hertfordshire, UK, and Research Associate at Nelson Mandela University, South Africa as well as a Director of the Khanyisa Project, a non-profit partnership seeking to address employability issues in the Eastern Cape of South Africa. His research interests include comparative employment relations, international HRM and labour economics, with the central strand connecting all aspects of this research being to explore the relationship between national institutional configurations and firm level work and employment practices.

    Title: ‘The impact of platform work upon employment, employability and employment relations as well as its potential contribution to the community wealth building agenda’

    Abstract: The growth of platform-based approaches to organising tasks, utilised by Uber, Deliveroo, etc., has been well documented in the literature as has the related impact upon precarity, the nature of employment as well as the employment relationship. This paper seeks to explore the potential for delivering more favourable outcomes for platform-dependent employees, as well as for the wider society, as a result of integrating platform-based methods of organising work activities at the municipal level as part of a comprehensive and integrated approach to promoting and sustaining community wealth building.


    Dr Josh Healy is a Senior Research Fellow in the Centre for Workplace Leadership (CWL) at the University of Melbourne. He is one of Australia’s leading researchers and commentators on the future of work. Dr Healy studies, and engages actively in public debates about, many aspects of work and the changing labour market, including new technologies, workforce ageing, and the gig economy. His recent contributions on these topics include major reports, influential academic articles, editorial roles, media commentary, undergraduate teaching and event organisation. Dr Healy’s earlier publications deal with minimum wages, skill shortages, new immigrants’ labour market experiences.


    Dr Andreas Pekarek is a Lecturer in the Department of Management and Marketing at the University of Melbourne. He holds a PhD from Monash University. Andreas has published in such journals as The British Journal of Industrial Relations, Industrial Relations Journal, Journal of Industrial Relations, Industrial and Labor Relations Review and European Journal of Industrial Relations. His research focuses on unions and worker representation, collective bargaining, occupations and professions, and interdisciplinary and comparative approaches to work, HRM, and industrial relations.

    Title: 'Consumers and work in the gig economy: Dead end or High Road?'

    Abstract: The gig economy continues to attract strong academic and popular attention. While researchers have begun to explore the conditions of work in the gig economy and the responses from unions and governments, attempts have not yet been made to systematically study consumers’ views. We argue that if significant progress is to be made in shifting gig work away from its more problematic qualities, consumer sentiments must be understood and leveraged. Drawing on a unique Australian public opinion dataset, we explore consumers’ engagement with and attitudes towards the gig economy, as a basis for enriching the debate about how gig work conditions could be improved. We situate our findings within the literature on High Road employment practices, and attempt for the first time to apply this influential framework to the gig economy.


    Professor Michelle Welsh is Head of Department of Business Law and Taxation and Coordinator of Ethical Regulation Research Network, Centre for Global Business, Monash Business School. Michelle undertakes research and supervision in the area of corporate law, corporate regulation, enforcement and compliance. Michelle has published her research in leading Australian corporate law journals and a number of international journals. She was a chief investigator on an ARC Discovery Project with colleagues from the Melbourne Law School on a project entitled ‘Phoenix Activity: Regulating Fraudulent Use of the Corporate Form’ (2014-2016). Michelle has been invited to present her research at national and international workshops and conferences including the Hartnell Colloquium at the ANU in 2011 and the Fairness in Financial Services Workshop at UBC in Vancouver in 2012. She has presented seminars by invitation at the Australian Securities and Investments Commission, the University of Michigan, the Law Society of Hong Kong, the Hong Kong Institute of Chartered Secretaries and the Hong Kong Securities and Futures Commission.


    Geoff McGill, Adjunct Associate Professor, Monash Business School,has held senior executive roles in the Australian Public Service (APS), the resources sector, banking and finance. The focus of these roles has been primarily on workplace and cultural change and the policies and systems to implement and sustain major improvements in performance and behaviour at the national, enterprise and workplace level. In the APS the focus was on national policies to support industrial relations and workplace reform and in the private sector as a thought leader and advisor on the development of enterprise bargaining, employee engagement and labour market reform. Geoff has worked at the International Labour Organisation (ILO, Geneva), in New Zealand, UK, North and South America and the Middle East. Since establishing his own consultancy in 2005, he has been engaged in the mining and resources sector, heavy manufacturing, infrastructure, government, the judicial system and not for profit organisations. This work has included advice on employee relations strategy, organisation structure, systems design, leadership development and cultural change. His consulting practice has helped to add value to his former role at the Workplace Research Centre, Sydney University and current role as Adjunct Associate Professor (Practice) at the International Consortium for Research in Employment and Work (iCREW), Centre for Global Business, Monash University.

    Title: 'The future of work through the lens of Systems Leadership Theory'

    Abstract: Systems leadership theory posits that a cohesive culture is formed when people share mythologies (assumptions and beliefs) that a particular behaviour demonstrates positive or negative values. Work, or the absence of work, will be viewed positively or negatively depending on the mythologies of the social group making that judgment. Systems leadership theory defines work as “the turning of intention into reality". It provides a different perspective on what work is and the future of work. It raises fundamental questions about how work is recognised and rewarded and the importance of understanding the culture (shared mythologies) within which social and political policy responses are framed.


    Dr Catrina Denvir is a Senior Lecturer at the Department of Business Law and Taxation, Monash Business School, Monash University. She joined Monash from Ulster University where she Directed the Legal Innovation Centre - a joint initiative between the School of Law and the School of Computer Science and Intelligent Systems. The research Catrina conducts is inherently interdisciplinary and engages issues relevant to law, technology, legal services, legal education (public and professional), ethics, sociology, psychology (behaviour) and public policy. She has published widely on the subjects of: technological innovation in the legal profession; the role of law in everyday life; public understanding of the law; design of legal services; access to justice; industrial action, and; research methodology. She has a keen interest in applying methodologies from other fields, to the study of the law and has expertise in a broad range of qualitative and quantitative research methodologies, including: the development and implementation of cutting edge methods of data collection; experimental designs; innovative use of legal service administrative data; large-scale longitudinal and cross-sectional ‘legal need’ survey research; in-depth qualitative work on ethics and industrial action; methods employing virtual avatars; as well as complex multilevel statistical modelling of survey data.

    Title: 'From Robo-Resistance to Robo-Lawyer: The Impact of Digital Transformation on the Legal Profession'

    Abstract: What was once characterised as a relatively stable profession, unfettered by the influence of modernity and strongly resistant to external forces, the legal services sector has in recent years exhibited marked change. Key among these changes has been the profession’s growing receptiveness to digital technologies. In an environment of heightened competition brought about by deregulation, public spending funding cuts, changing client expectations, the emergence of unbundled legal services and new models of legal service delivery, technology has increasingly found its way into legal practice via commercially available software aimed at making the completion of high volume, repetitive tasks more efficient. Drawing on the response exhibited by a number of large international law firms, in this presentation I explore the impact of digitization on the delivery and organization of legal services. Looking beyond the familiar trope of ‘professional protectionism’, I explain the (allegedly) slow rate of technology adoption in law with reference to the features that distinguish the legal profession from that of other industries such as finance and banking. Finally, I consider the issues most likely to define the digitization agenda over the coming years, and the impact of change on employment practices within the legal sector.


    Professor Chongwoo Choe is Director of Centre for Global Business and Professor of Economics, Monash Business School, Monash University. Prior to joining Monash University in 2007, he worked at the Australian Graduate School of Management (UNSW) and La Trobe University. He also held visiting professorship at the University of Tokyo and Osaka University. He holds a PhD in economics from the University of Minnesota. His primary research interest is in what firms do both within and outside their organisational boundaries, spanning most disciplinary areas taught and researched at Monash Business School. His research has been published widely in major journals in economics, finance and management. His research has attracted considerable research funding both in Australia and overseas, including a number of ARC grants. His current research is in big data analytics, dynamic pricing and online privacy.


    Dr Kai Liu is an Associate Professor at the School of Labor and Human Resources, Renmin University of China, Beijing. His areas of expertise lie in health policy and social policy in developing countries. He obtained his PhD from The Chinese University of Hong Kong in 2015. With a Fulbright Scholarship he conducted a comparative study of health care systems at Harvard University from 2014 to 2015. As a social policy researcher he has conducted systematic analyses of health insurance, health equity, and poverty in developing countries. Lately he has been analyzing multi-level health policy implementation in China using big data.

    Title: 'Effect of workers’ involvement into the sharing economy on their enrolment in social insurance programs: Evidence from China'

    Abstract: The sharing economy is exploding and brings about a quite new working style. The emergence of crowd working transforms employment relations to work relations. This change is a big challenge to social insurance system that is organized based on employment and formal contract. However, little empirical evidence is known about the real effect of the sharing economy on social insurance system. Using a survey data collected in a food delivery platform, we examined the effects of the degree of workers’ involvement into the sharing economy on their enrollment and willingness of enrolling in social insurance programs in China. We found that the degree of involvement into the sharing economy predicts lower likelihood of enrolling in insurance, but higher enrolling willingness. Worker’s hukou significantly moderates the above relationships. Those from rural areas became the least likely to enroll and to be willing to enroll in social insurance. The eligibility of social insurance needs to be reformed by considering worker’s work transaction instead of employment status only. The reform of social insurance system should also pay attention to the rural-urban dichotomy in the era of the sharing economy.


    Liqiu Zhao is an Associate Professor at the School of Labor and Human Resources, Renmin University of China. She obtained her PhD in Economics from Katholieke Universiteit Leuven in 2012. Her research of field includes human capital development, labor market policies and institutions, and migration. Currently she has been working on the construction of preschools and human capital development in China.


    Nanfeng Luo is an Associate Professor at the School of Labor and Human Resources, Renmin University of China. He gained his PhD in Management from University of New South Wales, Australia. His research interests primarily fall in the areas of organizational theory, strategic HRM, and corporate social responsibility. His research appears in the outlets such as Journal of Management Studies, Academy of Management Perspectives, and Journal of business Ethics. He currently serves on the editorial board of Asia Pacific Journal of Management.

    Title: 'Are there returns to experience for gig workers: Evidence from food delivery riders in China'

    Abstract: The flexibility of employment is the largest benefits of gig economy. Gig jobs are usually temporary or project-based. This study aims to examine whether experience accumulation is valuable to the workers in gig economy. Using data of a large number of the delivery riders from Meituan-Dianping, which is the world's largest online and on-demand delivery platform, we find that the experience of delivery riders is positively associated with monthly income and total number of deliveries within a month. Specifically, an additional month of experience increases the total number of deliveries of delivery riders by approximately 3.7 percent. Moreover, experience significantly decreases the average time for delivery and thus increases punctuality rate. Experienced riders have a significantly higher share of deliveries during lunch shift and lower share of deliveries during dinner shift. The results imply that providing more protection for workers in the gig economy may improve worker productivity through increased experience on the platform. The short-term engagements of gig workers may result in reduced accumulation of experience, which tends to harm worker productivity.


    Geoffrey Wood is Dean and Professor of International Business, at Essex Business School. Previously he was Professor of International Business at Warwick Business School, UK. He will be moving to the University of Western Ontario, Canada in July 2019, to become the DanCap Chair of Innovation, and Head of DAN Management. He has authored/co-authored/edited eighteen books, and more than 170 articles in peer-reviewed journals. He holds honorary positions at Griffith and Monash University in Australia, and Witwatersrand and Nelson Mandela Universities in South Africa. He is Co-Editor-in-Chief of the British Journal of Management, a Journal of the British Academy of Management (BAM). He is Co-Editor of the Annals of Corporate Governance and Associate Editor of Academy of Management Perspectives, a journal of the (US) Academy of Management. He is also Co-Editor of the UK’s Chartered Association of Business Schools Academic Journal Guide and was appointed to review the Australian Business Deans Council (ABDC) Journal List. He has had numerous research grants, including funding councils (e.g. ESRC), government departments (e.g. US Department of Labor; UK Department of Work and Pensions), charities (e.g. Nuffield Foundation), the labour movement (e.g. the ITF) and the European Union.

    Title: ‘Events beyond existing experience and the firm’

    Abstract: There are a number of high probability events, which fall beyond the existing framework of historical understanding. This would include events such as global warming effects on a scale that involve the moving of a mega city, its firms and people, the collapse of antibiotic effectiveness, the shift of one of the major liberal market economies to authoritarian rule, etc.   There is also the challenge of renewed economic crisis, and the long-term effects of the present energy region on industries and nations. There is further a widespread view that technological advances may undermine the scale and scope of decent employment and fuel the rise of insecure and gig working. How are all these events inter-related? And, what does this really mean for the nature of work and employment, both within and between distinct varieties of capitalism? This talk explores these interlinkages, taking a long historical view.


    Dr Marjorie Jerrard is a Senior Lecturer the Faculty of Business and Economics at Monash University. Marjorie holds a PhD in trade union strategy in the meat industry from Monash University, awarded in 2005, a Masters of Arts (Ancient History) from the University of Queensland and a Graduate Diploma in Industrial Relations from the Queensland University of Technology. Trade union effectiveness and strategy; union-community alliances; trade unions and environmental issues and politics; industrial relations and human resource management in the Australian and New Zealand meat processing industries; diversity management and industrial relations.


    Peter Turnbull is Professor of Management & Industrial Relations in the School of Economics, Finance & Management, University of Bristol. He previously held posts at the Universities of Cardiff, Leeds, Warwick and the London School of Economics, and visiting posts at the Universities of Queen’s (Northern Ireland), Cornell (USA), and La Trobe, Melbourne, Monash and RMIT (Australia). His research focuses on the European transport sector (specifically civil aviation, maritime and ports, inland waterways, and road transport) and the impact of transport (de)regulation on employment, industrial relations and HRM. Professor Turnbull is an Academic Fellow of the Chartered Institute of Personnel & Development (CIPD) and a member of the Advisory, Conciliation & Arbitration Service (ACAS) Arbitration Panel.

    Title: 'The Menace of an Open Market in a Digital Age: Capital and Labour Mobility in the European Union (EU)'

    Abstract: The only universal ‘law’ of industrial relations – attributed to John Commons – is that union organisation and collective bargaining tends to follow the contours or boundaries of the market, certainly from the local to the national but not, it seems, the international. For Commons, conflict over changes to the market, what he called the ‘menace of competition’, was both internal (within the existing market) and external (cheap producers abroad). With an ever-widening area of political control, ‘these external menaces become internal, and it is this moving frontier that determines the scope and character of protective organization and protective legislation’ (J.R. Commons, Quarterly Journal of Economics, 1909, p.78). In Europe, political control of the single market has failed to protect the wages and working conditions of transport workers. An open market characterized by the ‘freedom of establishment’ and the ‘freedom to provide services’ has created unprecedented opportunities for new digital business strategies and employment practices, and both ‘protective organizations’ (e.g. trade unions and employers’ associations) and legislation (the European ‘social agenda’) is found to be seriously wanting.


    Tim Lyons is a Research Fellow at progressive think-tank Per Capita and Deputy Chairman of large Industry Superannuation Fund. He is co-Director of Reveille Strategy which works with unions and non-governmental organisations (NGOs) on organising, campaigning, technology, strategy and governance in Australia, New Zealand and the United States. Tim was a union official for more than twenty years, including seven years as Assistant Secretary of the Australian Council of Trade Unions (ACTU) where he was responsible for organising programs and led the work program on labour law, economics and pensions.

    Title: ‘What is the organising potential of AI for workers and unions?’

    Abstract: Using a real example in current use in Australia and the US, the author will examine how AI has the potential to scale industrial relations advice in a way that dramatically lowers the barriers for a worker to interact with a union or other labour organisation and which helps deal with cost disease. Coupled with a program to create online communities and a targeted online to offline organising program, the author makes the case that unions can use AI to help drive the development of a new and different cohort activists, new forms or organisation, secure an existing organised base and outreach to large un-organised sections of the workforce.


    Fang Lee Cooke is Associate Dean (Graduate Research) and Professor of Human Resource Management (HRM) and Asia Studies at Monash Business School, Monash University. She is also a Fellow of the Academy of the Social Sciences in Australia. Previously, she was a full professor (since 2005) at Manchester Business School, University of Manchester, UK. Fang’s recent research projects include: Chinese firms in Africa and their employment/HRM practices and labour relations; employee resilience, HRM practices and engagement in the finance sector in the Asian region; the evolution of industrial relations and implications for foreign firms in South Asia; organizational practices and management models in the care sector; HRM in the care sector, including healthcare, aged care and disability care; and digitalization and implications for skill, employment and HRM.

    Title: Digitalisation and decent work: Implications for Pacific Island Countries’

    Abstract: The increasing pace of digitalisation and the adoption of digital technology by employers in different parts of the world has led to some significant changes in the way employment and work is organised, with potentially serious implications for skill requirements, labour standards and workers’ wellbeing. These changes are not only displacing jobs but also creating new jobs, new skill requirements and new ways of working, which have profound implications for human capital development, business strategy at the organisational and industrial level, and the organisation of workers. These developments also raise fundamental questions for government policy; employer associations; and trade unions. In 2017, ILO initiated ‘The Future of Work We Want: A Global Dialogue’, which draws our attention to the question of what kind of future work we want against a context of digitalisation and robotisation at workplaces. Building on this momentum, this study (in progress) examines implications of digitalisation for decent work in its Pacific constituent countries. The study aims to assess digital readiness and understand key stakeholders’ views on how digitalisation is affecting their businesses and nation states. It analyses the current situation in the Pacific and provide policy and practical recommendations.


    Professor Simon Wilkie is Dean, Faculty of Business and Economics, and Head, Monash Business School. He has a PhD and MA in Economics from the University of Rochester, and a BComm (Hons) with first class honours in Economics from the University of New South Wales. His research has particularly focused on game theory, its application to business strategy, economic and regulatory policy design, and the economics of the communications industries. With an exceptional record for advancing multi-disciplinary collaborative research and leveraging its potential to transform policy and create lasting impact, Professor Wilkie is widely published on the subjects of spectrum auctions, game theory and telecommunications regulation in leading scholarly journals. He is a member of the editorial board of the International Journal of Communication and a former member of the editorial board of the Journal of Public Economic Theory. Professor Wilkie’s career spans a remarkable array of roles that extend beyond the higher education sphere, including appointments as Chief Economic Policy Strategist at Microsoft Corporation and Chief Economist with the US Federal Communications Commission. He joined Monash University in January this year from the University of Southern California (USC), where he was Professor of Economics in the Department of Economics, and Professor of Economics, Communication and Law in the USC Gould School of Law. He was previously head of USC’s Department of Economics and the USC Center for Communication Law and Policy.

    Title: ‘Digital transformation and global markets’

    Abstract: The digital transformation is bringing many new challenges and opportunities, at a pace not seen for more than a century. This disruption is largely being fuelled by inexpensive connected devices, wireless technologies, cloud computing, and artificial intelligence. Estimates for the speed and scale of the transformation suggest that by 2020 there will be 34 billion devices connected to the internet, generating 44 zettabytes (billion terabytes) of data. Companies and countries that successfully navigate this storm of disruption will embrace artificial intelligence while emphasising human creativity, develop nimble teams, be data driven, and create new markets that both replace existing institutions and enable innovative new products and services that are impossible today. This session will examine some of the profound changes that will affect critical areas of metrics, markets, organisations and jobs.


    Please note, the speakers and/or topics may be updated.

    Contact

    iCREW Co-Directors/Symposium co-hosts: Professors Greg J. Bamber and Fang Lee Cooke

    Symposium logistics AHRI team: andrew.whyte@ahri.com.au, cpdevents@ahri.com.au