Robust Alternatives to the Corporation

09/10/2020 11:00 am 09/10/2020 12:00 pm Australia/Melbourne Robust Alternatives to the Corporation

Monash Business School’s International Consortium for Values-based Governance (ICVG) within the Centre for Global Business (CGB) invites you to the next webinar in the CGB series ‘Robust Alternatives to the Corporation’.

Public corporations have been vanishing in the US for the past two decades. There are half as many listed companies today as there were in 1997, and just five tech firms make up 22 per cent of the value of the S&P 500 Index. Meanwhile, the traditional blue chips are increasingly irrelevant. Why is this happening, and what comes next?

In this talk, Professor Jerry Davis will describe the technological changes underlying the changing organisation of the US economy, and what the future might bring for the corporation and its challengers.

Our speaker for this event is Professor Jerry Davis, Gilbert and Ruth Whitaker Professor of Business Administration at the Ross School of Business and Professor of Sociology, The University of Michigan and Fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University.

This webinar will be hosted by Dr Christo Karuna, from Monash Business School’s Department of Accounting, and founder and coordinator of the International Consortium for Values-based Governance. Moderator will be public policy expert Professor Michael Mintrom, Monash University.

Jerry Davis

Jerry Davis received his PhD from the Graduate School of Business at Stanford University and taught at Northwestern and Columbia before moving to the University of Michigan, where he is the Gilbert and Ruth Whitaker Professor of Business Administration and Professor of Sociology. In 2020-21 he is a Fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences at Stanford. Jerry has published widely in management, sociology, and finance. Books include Social Movements and Organization Theory (Cambridge University Press, 2005); Organizations and Organizing (Pearson Prentice Hall, 2007); Managed by the Markets: How Finance Reshaped America (Oxford University Press, 2009); Changing your Company from the Inside Out: A Guide for Social Intrapreneurs (Harvard Business Review Press, 2015); and The Vanishing American Corporation (Berrett Koehler, 2016).

Davis’s research is broadly concerned with the corporation as a social and economic vehicle. Recent writings examine why corporations have so little insight into their global supply chains and the moral dilemmas this poses; why the social network of corporate elites has fallen apart; what organizational alternative exist to the shareholder-owned corporation; how national institutions shape corporate structures, and what this means for income inequality; how platform capitalism might be tamed to meet human needs other than profit; how management research might help achieve the Sustainable Development Goals; how new technologies have enabled worker political activism within the corporation; how social scientists can inform public opinion; and how information and communication technologies have enabled entirely new designs for economic organization. His current book project examines corporate power in the 21st century, and how to tame it.

Register now

Event Details

Date:
10 September 2020 at 11:00 am – 12:00 pm
Venue:
Online - Melbourne time
Categories:
Economics

Description

Monash Business School’s International Consortium for Values-based Governance (ICVG) within the Centre for Global Business (CGB) invites you to the next webinar in the CGB series ‘Robust Alternatives to the Corporation’.

Public corporations have been vanishing in the US for the past two decades. There are half as many listed companies today as there were in 1997, and just five tech firms make up 22 per cent of the value of the S&P 500 Index. Meanwhile, the traditional blue chips are increasingly irrelevant. Why is this happening, and what comes next?

In this talk, Professor Jerry Davis will describe the technological changes underlying the changing organisation of the US economy, and what the future might bring for the corporation and its challengers.

Our speaker for this event is Professor Jerry Davis, Gilbert and Ruth Whitaker Professor of Business Administration at the Ross School of Business and Professor of Sociology, The University of Michigan and Fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University.

This webinar will be hosted by Dr Christo Karuna, from Monash Business School’s Department of Accounting, and founder and coordinator of the International Consortium for Values-based Governance. Moderator will be public policy expert Professor Michael Mintrom, Monash University.

Jerry Davis

Jerry Davis received his PhD from the Graduate School of Business at Stanford University and taught at Northwestern and Columbia before moving to the University of Michigan, where he is the Gilbert and Ruth Whitaker Professor of Business Administration and Professor of Sociology. In 2020-21 he is a Fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences at Stanford. Jerry has published widely in management, sociology, and finance. Books include Social Movements and Organization Theory (Cambridge University Press, 2005); Organizations and Organizing (Pearson Prentice Hall, 2007); Managed by the Markets: How Finance Reshaped America (Oxford University Press, 2009); Changing your Company from the Inside Out: A Guide for Social Intrapreneurs (Harvard Business Review Press, 2015); and The Vanishing American Corporation (Berrett Koehler, 2016).

Davis’s research is broadly concerned with the corporation as a social and economic vehicle. Recent writings examine why corporations have so little insight into their global supply chains and the moral dilemmas this poses; why the social network of corporate elites has fallen apart; what organizational alternative exist to the shareholder-owned corporation; how national institutions shape corporate structures, and what this means for income inequality; how platform capitalism might be tamed to meet human needs other than profit; how management research might help achieve the Sustainable Development Goals; how new technologies have enabled worker political activism within the corporation; how social scientists can inform public opinion; and how information and communication technologies have enabled entirely new designs for economic organization. His current book project examines corporate power in the 21st century, and how to tame it.

Register now