2021 Monash Business Behavioural Laboratory Symposium

11/23/2021 08:00 pm 11/24/2021 09:50 pm Australia/Melbourne 2021 Monash Business Behavioural Laboratory Symposium

The Symposium will run over two days: Tuesday 23 November 8pm – 10.10pm AEDT and Wednesday 24 November 8pm – 9.50pm AEDT.

What motivates people to pay their taxes? Do we manage our emotions strategically in the workplace and if so, does it work?

These questions and more will be explored at the symposium, to be held over two evenings and bring together esteemed speakers to discuss a range of behavioural methods and data collection approaches. These include eye-tracking, skin conductance, EEG and psychometric measurements.

The symposium will be interdisciplinary, and feature researchers associated with the MBBL, leading academics and practitioners interested in applying behavioural research.

Download presentation abstracts

Download program overview

Day 1

Tuesday 23 November 2021, 8pm - 10.10 pm (AEDT)

Sessions moderator: A/Prof Kristan Rotaru

Presenter 1:  A/Prof Boris van Leeuwen, Tilburg University

A/Prof van Leeuwen is an Associate Professor at the Department of Economics at Tilburg University, the Netherlands. He was formerly a research fellow at the Institute for Advanced Study (IAST) in Toulouse and the Toulouse School of Economics (TSE), France. He obtained his PhD at the Centre for Research in Experimental Economics and Political Decision Making (CREED), at the University of Amsterdam. A/Prof van Leeuwen is primarily interested in experimental and behavioral economics.


Presenter 2: Dr Shengchuang Feng, Nanyang Technological University

Dr Feng is currently a postdoctoral research fellow at the Centre for Lifelong Learning and Individualised Cognition (CLIC), Nanyang Technological University, Singapore. He received his doctoral degree in psychology at Virginia Tech in 2020, and was a postdoctoral associate at the Fralin Biomedical Research Institute of Virginia Tech. His research interests include social cognition, reward-guided learning/decision-making and related disruptions in mental disorders such as depression, addiction, and anxiety. He uses computational models, self-report measures, and functional magnetic resonance imaging to understand the behavioural and neural mechanisms of social and nonsocial cognition in healthy and clinical populations.


Presenter 3:  Dr Elizabeth Bowman, University of Melbourne

Dr Bowman is postdoctoral fellow in decision neuroscience in the Brain, Minds and Markets Laboratory in the Department of Finance, Faculty of Business and Economics, University of Melbourne. Her current research looks at how variations in neurotransmitters may affect how people make complex optimisation decisions and decisions under risk and uncertainty. This includes pharmacological, eye-tracking and pupillometry investigations of how humans make decisions under conditions of varying computational complexity.

Day 2

Wednesday 24 November 2021, 8pm - 9.50 pm (AEDT)

Sessions moderator: Prof Harmen Oppewal


Presenter 1: Dr Milad Haghani, University of New South Wales

Dr Haghani is a senior lecturer at the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of New South Wales (UNSW). He is a multidisciplinary researcher, but the core of his work resides at the intersection of transportation and safety, with a focus on human factors. He teaches road safety and traffic psychology at UNSW. Dr Haghani has contributed extensively to the areas of crowd dynamics and evacuation modelling in both numerical and experimental fronts, and has pioneered innovative applications of econometric choice methods in these domains. He has published nearly 50 research articles as a first or sole author. In his previous work, Dr Haghani has undertaken extensive empirical investigations of hypothetical bias in choice experiments, particularly in non-monetary choice applications.


Presenter 2:  A/Prof Kristian Rotaru, Monash Business School

A/Prof Rotaru is a decision scientist working in the Department of Accounting, Monash Business School. His latest research focuses on risk analysis, professional judgement in managerial accounting and auditing, affective decision making in everyday economic behaviours, neurocognitive and functional correlates of addiction, and on designing and testing interventions for behavioural change. He collaborates with a number of research labs, including BrainPark (Monash University), The Clinical Psychedelic Research Lab/Paul Liknaitzky Lab (Monash University), and Brain, Mind and Markets Laboratory (University of Melbourne). In 2018, he was presented with the Commonwealth Bank Award for Financial Wellbeing at The Behavioural Exchange Conference (BX2018) for his research on behavioural interventions associated with developing financial skills training schemes.


Organised by

Monash Business School - Monash Business Behaviour Lab

Event Details

Date:
23 November 2021 at 8:00 pm – 24 November 2021 at 9:50 pm
Venue:
Online
Categories:
General

Description

The Symposium will run over two days: Tuesday 23 November 8pm – 10.10pm AEDT and Wednesday 24 November 8pm – 9.50pm AEDT.

What motivates people to pay their taxes? Do we manage our emotions strategically in the workplace and if so, does it work?

These questions and more will be explored at the symposium, to be held over two evenings and bring together esteemed speakers to discuss a range of behavioural methods and data collection approaches. These include eye-tracking, skin conductance, EEG and psychometric measurements.

The symposium will be interdisciplinary, and feature researchers associated with the MBBL, leading academics and practitioners interested in applying behavioural research.

Download presentation abstracts

Download program overview

Day 1

Tuesday 23 November 2021, 8pm - 10.10 pm (AEDT)

Sessions moderator: A/Prof Kristan Rotaru

Presenter 1:  A/Prof Boris van Leeuwen, Tilburg University

A/Prof van Leeuwen is an Associate Professor at the Department of Economics at Tilburg University, the Netherlands. He was formerly a research fellow at the Institute for Advanced Study (IAST) in Toulouse and the Toulouse School of Economics (TSE), France. He obtained his PhD at the Centre for Research in Experimental Economics and Political Decision Making (CREED), at the University of Amsterdam. A/Prof van Leeuwen is primarily interested in experimental and behavioral economics.


Presenter 2: Dr Shengchuang Feng, Nanyang Technological University

Dr Feng is currently a postdoctoral research fellow at the Centre for Lifelong Learning and Individualised Cognition (CLIC), Nanyang Technological University, Singapore. He received his doctoral degree in psychology at Virginia Tech in 2020, and was a postdoctoral associate at the Fralin Biomedical Research Institute of Virginia Tech. His research interests include social cognition, reward-guided learning/decision-making and related disruptions in mental disorders such as depression, addiction, and anxiety. He uses computational models, self-report measures, and functional magnetic resonance imaging to understand the behavioural and neural mechanisms of social and nonsocial cognition in healthy and clinical populations.


Presenter 3:  Dr Elizabeth Bowman, University of Melbourne

Dr Bowman is postdoctoral fellow in decision neuroscience in the Brain, Minds and Markets Laboratory in the Department of Finance, Faculty of Business and Economics, University of Melbourne. Her current research looks at how variations in neurotransmitters may affect how people make complex optimisation decisions and decisions under risk and uncertainty. This includes pharmacological, eye-tracking and pupillometry investigations of how humans make decisions under conditions of varying computational complexity.

Day 2

Wednesday 24 November 2021, 8pm - 9.50 pm (AEDT)

Sessions moderator: Prof Harmen Oppewal


Presenter 1: Dr Milad Haghani, University of New South Wales

Dr Haghani is a senior lecturer at the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of New South Wales (UNSW). He is a multidisciplinary researcher, but the core of his work resides at the intersection of transportation and safety, with a focus on human factors. He teaches road safety and traffic psychology at UNSW. Dr Haghani has contributed extensively to the areas of crowd dynamics and evacuation modelling in both numerical and experimental fronts, and has pioneered innovative applications of econometric choice methods in these domains. He has published nearly 50 research articles as a first or sole author. In his previous work, Dr Haghani has undertaken extensive empirical investigations of hypothetical bias in choice experiments, particularly in non-monetary choice applications.


Presenter 2:  A/Prof Kristian Rotaru, Monash Business School

A/Prof Rotaru is a decision scientist working in the Department of Accounting, Monash Business School. His latest research focuses on risk analysis, professional judgement in managerial accounting and auditing, affective decision making in everyday economic behaviours, neurocognitive and functional correlates of addiction, and on designing and testing interventions for behavioural change. He collaborates with a number of research labs, including BrainPark (Monash University), The Clinical Psychedelic Research Lab/Paul Liknaitzky Lab (Monash University), and Brain, Mind and Markets Laboratory (University of Melbourne). In 2018, he was presented with the Commonwealth Bank Award for Financial Wellbeing at The Behavioural Exchange Conference (BX2018) for his research on behavioural interventions associated with developing financial skills training schemes.


Organised by

Monash Business School - Monash Business Behaviour Lab