Residential segregation and unequal access to local public services in India

05/3/2022 09:00 am 05/3/2022 10:00 am Australia/Melbourne Residential segregation and unequal access to local public services in India

Residential neighbourhoods are crucial in determining access to opportunity in rich countries, a large body of evidence has demonstrated.

But in rapidly urbanising lower-income countries, neighbourhood settlement patterns and disparities in economic outcomes have been less studied.

Speaker A/Prof Paul Novostad's research helps to close this gap by analysing settlement patterns, access to public services, and economic outcomes across 1.5 million neighbourhoods for two of India's marginalised communities: Scheduled Castes (SCs) and Muslims.

But patterns of segregation and unequal access to public services in India's cities largely replicate the striking inequalities in its villages.

SCs living in cities experience similar segregation to Black people in the USA, and Muslims slightly less so.

However, Muslim neighbourhoods are more disadvantaged in terms of access to government education and health facilities than SC neighbourhoods.

The evidence shows children growing up in segregated neighbourhoods receive less schooling, even those from families where parents are educated and everyday needs are met.

Unequal access to public facilities in India's highly segregated neighbourhoods may be a significant contributor to the general disadvantage faced by marginalised groups in the modern economy.

Presented by

Associate Professor Paul Novosad, Dartmouth

SoDa Labs webinar series

The SoDa Labs webinar series provides a platform for researchers around the world to present work that uses novel and alternative data and/or tools from data science and beyond to answer social science questions.

Register now

Event Details

Date:
3 May 2022 at 9:00 am – 10:00 am
Venue:
Online
Categories:
General; SoDa Labs; SoDa Labs Webinars

Description

Residential neighbourhoods are crucial in determining access to opportunity in rich countries, a large body of evidence has demonstrated.

But in rapidly urbanising lower-income countries, neighbourhood settlement patterns and disparities in economic outcomes have been less studied.

Speaker A/Prof Paul Novostad's research helps to close this gap by analysing settlement patterns, access to public services, and economic outcomes across 1.5 million neighbourhoods for two of India's marginalised communities: Scheduled Castes (SCs) and Muslims.

But patterns of segregation and unequal access to public services in India's cities largely replicate the striking inequalities in its villages.

SCs living in cities experience similar segregation to Black people in the USA, and Muslims slightly less so.

However, Muslim neighbourhoods are more disadvantaged in terms of access to government education and health facilities than SC neighbourhoods.

The evidence shows children growing up in segregated neighbourhoods receive less schooling, even those from families where parents are educated and everyday needs are met.

Unequal access to public facilities in India's highly segregated neighbourhoods may be a significant contributor to the general disadvantage faced by marginalised groups in the modern economy.

Presented by

Associate Professor Paul Novosad, Dartmouth

SoDa Labs webinar series

The SoDa Labs webinar series provides a platform for researchers around the world to present work that uses novel and alternative data and/or tools from data science and beyond to answer social science questions.

Register now


E-Mail
SoDaLabs@monash.edu