MonLEE Researchers

Current research at MonLEE spans across a wide range of economic areas, including development, cooperation, charitable giving, price discrimination and leadership. Learn more about our researchers below.

NameResearch Areas

Klaus Abbink

  • Corruption: Testing anti-corruption policies, finding determinants of corruption;
  • Conflict: Contest models, war games;
  • Development (with focus on experimental methods in low-income settings). Microfinance models and other stuff;
  • (Anti-)social preferences and behaviour, (anti-)social norms.
Nick Feltovich
  • Bargaining;
  • Game theory;
  • Price formation.

Lata Gangadharan

  • Attitudes towards anti-social preferences: corruption, envy, bad norms; the impact of these kinds of preferences and design measures to alleviate them;
  • Leadership;
  • Gender;
  • Designing mechanisms (incentives, markets, tournaments, for example) to improve environmental outcomes;
  • Pro-social preferences: cooperation, charitable giving, inequality and mechanisms to understand their impact in society.

Philip Grossman

  • Charitable giving;
  • Leadership;
  • Gender.

Elias Khalil

  • Rationality, ethics, and the emotions;
  • Political Economy;
  • Evolutionary Economics.

Andreas Leibbrandt

  • Experimental research on the relationship between cooperation and competitiveness;
  • The positive and negative impacts of affirmative action policies;
  • Price discrimination.

Vai-Lam Mui

  • Theoretical and experimental work in behavioural economics and political economy;
  • Identity and cooperation in the inter-group prisoner's dilemma;
  • Individual versus group choices of repeated game strategies in social dilemmas;
  • Network formation;
  • Parental up-bring and ethic formation;
  • Political economy of succession.

Birendra Rai

  • Other regarding preferences

Anmol Ratan

  • Microeconomic theory;
  • Experimental and Behavioral Economics: Design, external validity, non standard preferences;
  • Markets: Tests and simulations

Erte Xiao

  • Prosocial behavior such as reciprocity, trust, and inequality aversion;
  • Designing incentive mechanisms to promote good behavior such as volunteering and healthy habits;
  • Communication and signaling value of monetary incentives in enforcing cooperation;
  • Social norms;
  • Deception;
  • Corruption;
  • Leadership and gender.