A/Professor Nemai Karmakar

A/Professor Nemai Karmakar

Associate Professor
Department of Electrical and Computer Systems Engineering
Room 230, 14 Alliance Lane, Clayton Campus

Nemai Chandra Karmakar (IEEE StM91, M 91, SrM99) obtained the B.Sc (EEE) and M.Sc (EEE) from Bangladesh University of Engineering and Technology, Dhaka in 1987 and 1989 respectively, the M.Sc (EE) degree in Electrical Engineering from the University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Canada in 1991, the PhD degree from the University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia in 1999, Postgraduate Diploma in Teaching in Higher Education (PGDipTHE) from Nanyang Technological University, Singapore in 2001 and Master in Higher Education (MHEd) from Griffith University, Brisbane, Australia in 2007. His MHEd research is on “Developing Engineering Students’ Transferable Skills Through Work Placement at NTU, Singapore.” His PhD thesis work concerned the area of switched beam and phased array antennas for mobile satellite communications. His PhD work was one of the most significant findings at The University of Queensland in 1998 and published in national media such as ABC Radio and Canberra Times. His PhD work was elected the third best student paper in 1997 Asia Pacific Microwave Conference held in Hong Kong. From 1989 to 1990, he worked as an Assistant Engineer in Electronics Institute, Atomic Energy Research Establishment, Dhaka, Bangladesh. In August 1990, he was a Research Assistant at the Communications Research Group, University of Saskatchewan, Canada. From 1992 to 1995 he worked as a Microwave Design Engineer at Mitec Ltd., Brisbane, Australia where he contributed to the development of land mobile satellite antennas for the Australian Mobilesat. From 1995 to 1996 he taught final year courses on Microwaves and Antenna Technologies at Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Australia. From September 1998 to March 1999 he worked as a research engineer within the Radar Laboratory, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore. From March 1999 to July 2004 he was an Assistant Professor and Graduate Advisor in the Division of Communication Engineering, the School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore. From July 2004 to date he is a Senior Lecturer in the Department of Electrical and Computer Systems Engineering, Monash University, Clayton, Australia.
Dr. Karmakar’s research interests cover areas such as RFID, smart antennas for mobile and satellite communications, electromagnetic bandgap structure (EBG) assisted RF devices, planar phased array antennas, broadband microstrip antennas and arrays, beam-forming networks, near-field/far-field antenna measurements, microwave device modeling, monostatic and bistatic radars. He has published more than 200 referred journal and conference papers, 3 books and twenty four book chapters. His biography has been included (by invitation) in Marquis Who’s Who in Science and Technology 2002-2003, 2004-2005, 2005-2006 edition as a pioneer in planar phased arrays and Marquis Who’s Who in the World (by invitation) 2007. He is a member of the editorial board of a number of journals.

Qualifications

  • MHEd, Education, Griffith University
  • Doctor of Philosophy (PhD), ITEE, The University of Queensland
  • MSc, Electrical Engineer, The University of Saskatchewan
  • MSc Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Bangladesh University of Engineering and Technology
  • BSc Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Bangladesh University of Engineering and Technology

Editorial

  • International Journal of RF and Microwave Computer Aided Engineering;
  • International Journal on Smart Sensing and Intelligent Systems;
  • International Journal of Automated Identification Technology; and
  • International Journal of Ultra Wideband Communications and Systems;
  • Invitation for E-book Series, Bentham Science Publishers, The Netherlands.

Professional Association

Senior Member – IEEE, IEEE APS, IEEE MWTTS, IEEE Education Society
Graduate member – IEAust (1991).

Research Projects

Current projects

LiFi technology improvement

ARC Research Hub for Processing Lignocellulosics into High Value Products

The Hub aims to convert renewable and readily-available biomass material and waste streams from the Australian Pulp, Paper and Forest Industry into new, high-value products that are in high demand in existing and developing markets. The Hub will leverage world-leading Australian and international research capabilities in chemistry, materials science, and engineering to create new materials, chemicals, companies and jobs in an emerging and newly diversified Australian bio-economy. Research will identify new applications and products derived from lignocellulose and will feed the pharmaceutical, chemicals, plastics and food packaging industries.

Airborne passive radiometer for high resolution soil moisture monitoring

A passive multi-band soil moisture measuring radiometer at L-, Ku- and Ka-bands is proposed. The radiometer comprises a 3-band shared aperture antenna array, a receiving electronics, a digital controller and a data logger. The array antenna comprises dual polarised stacked patch elements to resonate at the three distinct bands. Beamforming networks form agile beams to scan the ground. Sensitive radiometer receivers apply brightness temperature downscaling for high resolution soil moisture data. The high resolution passive radiometer will revolutionize the light aircraft airborne soil moisture monitoring by removing the mechanically steerable bulky and heavy scanheads.

Regni Science Technology - N Karmakar

Chipless RFID for Barcode Replacement

This project aims to investigate broadband fractal antennas with multi-resonators to store information on chipless radio-frequency identification (RFID) transponders. These antenna-resonator combinations allow the preparation of inexpensive, fully-printable passive transponders in which individual inductance-capacitance structures within the resonators create, in a 1:1 mapping, corresponding resonant responses in the frequency domain. The unique set of resonances is used to encode binary information. Each structural feature in the resonator is directly connected to a particular resonant frequency. Transponders may be predictably and individually imparted with an address at the point of production in much the same way that barcodes are.

Past projects

Electronically Controlled Phased Array Antenna for Universal UHF RFID Applications

A broadband electronically steerable smart antenna for the ultra-high-frequency (UHF) RFID reader in a lowcost, low-weight and planar format is developed. The universal antenna seamlessly services reader electronics in any region. The antenna will be designed from scratch incorporating custom made broadband antenna elements, digital phase shifters, variable attenuators, power dividers and field programmable gate array (FPGA) control electronics. The antenna loaded with appropriate software directs beams towards desired tags and s towards interferences hence improves system capacity. The antenna is also capable to locate tags within its reading range and avoid collision hence improve throughput of the system.

A multi-frequency microwave radiometer system for environmental research

A new capability for airborne remote sensing of key environmental variables will be established. The unique P-, Ku- and Ka-band passive microwave radiometer system will provide unprecedented information on soil moisture, surface temperature, and vegetation, and allow for a new satellite concept to be demonstrated. By combining with an existing L-band radiometer, data can be collected simultaneously at P-, L-, Ku- and Kabands, with increased spatial resolutions accordingly. The idea being that the shorter wavelength but higher spatial resolution data can be used to enhance the spatial resolution of the longer wavelength data, resulting in a capability to derive long wavelength observations from space at unprecedented spatial resolution.

MIMO-based technique for chipless RFID EM-imaging at 60 GHz

Research in bionic vision science and technology initiative. Direct stimulation of the visual cortex: a flexible strategy for restoring high-acuity pattern vision

The project will provide vision to sufferers of the three leading causes of blindness in Australia: Age-related macular degeneration (AMD), Glaucoma and diabetic retinopathy (DR), constituting 85% of all blindness. All three cannot be solved using retinal implants, so we will use intracortical microstimulation (ICMS) of the visual cortex, which bypasses the retina and optic nerve, allowing treatment of all visual impairments except the 7% that affect the brain directly. the project brings together a team of experts covering materials science, physiology, vision, electronic processing and neurosurgery. Their goal is human trial, then a commerical prototype with four years.

Back-scatter based RFID system capable of reading multiple chipless tags for regional and suburban libraries

A chipless RFID system comprised of an RFID reader and a chipless tag is designed and developed. The tag is a fully printable microwave passive circuit capable of producing unique identification code bits when received a band of signals in frequency domain or a sharp time domain pulse. The reader interrogates the tag sending appropriate code and receives encoded data from the tag. The received signal is decoded in the reader to generate a unique id code for the interrogated tag.

Smart Information Management of Partial Discharge in Switchyards using Smart Antennas

Partial Discharge (PD) in power apparatus is a serious problem in power grids in Australia and overseas. The project will investigate PD signals in switchyards. A smart antenna is proposed to detect PD activities in switchyard apparatus. Signal processing of the smart antenna will provide the direction of arrival of PD signals. Radio frequency identification (RFID) technology with the smart antenna will augment the unique identification of faulty equipment within the switchyard. Thus the detection, location and identification of faulty power apparatus will assist in the prevention of damage to neighbouring equipment, customer dissatisfaction, disruption to economic activities, and imposition of regulatory fines.

Printable Multi-Bit Radio Frequency Identification for Banknotes

This project aims to investigate broadband fractal antennas with multi-resonators to store information on chipless radio-frequency transponders on banknotes. These antenna-resonator combinations allow the preparation of inexpensive, fully-printable passive transponders in which individual inductance-capacitance structures within the resonators create, in a 1:1 mapping, corresponding resonant responses in the frequency domain. The unique set of resonances is used to encode binary information. Each structual feature in the resonator is directly connected to a particular resonant frequency. Transponders may be predictably and indiviudallimparted with an addess at the point of production in much the same way that barcodes are.

Radio Frequency Wireless Monitoring in Sleep Apnoea (Particularly for Paediatric Patients)

The monitoring of humans over long intervals of time is significantly limited by wires connecting sensors to the recording system. This is particularly the case when respiration, ECG, and brain activity need to be recorded during daily activity. The aim of the project is to develop a system for recording such parameters without wires by using an RFID type transceiver. Initially we will record polysomnographical parameters in humans during sleep. The system will ultimately be used to record multiple parameters from human subjects during any activity and therefore have a wide range of medical applications.

Development of Antenna for Detection of RF Signal from Partial Discharges

Investigation into improved wireless communication for rural and regional Australia

The project will develop high gain antennas for wireless communications. Electromagnetic band gap structures will be used as the back reflectors of the conventional antennas for wireless communications to improve the antenna gain, directivity and cross-polar levels. The outcomes will be a more efficient wireless communications infrastructure with more coverage and better quality communications for rural and regional Australia.

Research articles, papers & publications

See Nemai’s research contributions through published book chapters, articles, journal papers and in the media.

Last modified: October 19, 2017