Professor Xiao Zhao

Professor Xiao Zhao

Chair of Civil Engineering, Professor in Structural Engineering
Department of Civil Engineering
Room 118, 23 College Walk (B60), Clayton Campus

Xiao works in the Faculty of Engineering at Monash University as a Professor.

Qualifications

  • PhD, Civil Engineering, The University of Sydney
  • Doctor of Engineering (Higher Doctorate), Civil Engineering, The University of Sydney
  • MBA (Executive), Australian School of Management
  • Master's Degree, Mechanical Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University
  • Bachelor's Degree, Mechanical Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University

Appointment History:

Head of Department of Civil Engineering, Monash University, 2008-2011.
Chair of Civil Engineering, Monash University, from November 2001.
Senior Lecturer, Monash University, January 1998 to October 2001.
Lecturer, Monash University, January 1996 to December 1997.
Assistant Lecturer, Monash University, December 1994 to December 1995.
ARC Research Associate, The University of Sydney, October 1992 to  December 1994.

Awards and Honours:

2015 Member, ERA (Excellence in Research for Australia) Research Evaluation Committee for Engineering and Environmental Sciences Cluster.
2013 IIW (International Institute of Welding) Thomas Medal.
2013 The Royal Academy of Engineering Distinguished Visiting Fellow,Imperial College, London, UK.
2013 Swiss National Science Foundation Visiting Professor, EMPA, Switzerland.
2012 Doctor of Engineering, The University of Sydney, Australia.
2011 National 1000-talent Chair Professor, Tsinghua University, China.
2008 Vice-Chancellors Award for Excellence in Research – Postgraduate Supervision (Special Commendation), Monash University, Australia.
2007 ChangJiang Professor, TongJi University, China.
2006 Vice-Chancellors Award for Excellence in Research – Postgraduate Supervision (Special Commendation), Monash University, Australia.
2005 H.K. Cheng Structural Engineering Fellowship, Hong Kong.
2005 Visiting Professorship, EPFL, Lausanne, Switzerland.
2001 JSPS (Japan Society for the Promotion of Science) Invitation Fellowship (long-term).
1998 Adjunct Professor, Harbin University of Civil Engineering & Architecture, P.R.China.
1997 Alexander von Humboldt Research Fellowship, Germany.
1995 Engineering Excellence Award, The Institution of Engineers, Australia, Sydney Division.

Professional Association:

Member, Editorial Board for Thin-Walled Structures published by Elsevier.
Member, Editorial Board for International Journal of Structural Stability and Dynamics published by World Scientific.
Member, Editorial Board for Advances in Structural Engineering – An International Journal published by Multi Science.
Member, Editorial Board for Engineering Mechanics, China.
Member, Editorial Board for Industrial Construction, China.
Member, CIDECT (International Committee for the Development and Study of Tubular Structures) project working groups.
Australian Delegate, IIW (International Institute of Welding) Commission XV
Chairman, IIW SubCommission XV-E on Tubular Structures (2002 to 2014).
Chairman, IIFC (International Institute of FRP in Construction) working group on FRP Strengthened Metallic Structures (2005 to 2013).
Member, IIW Commission XIII on Fatigue.
Chairman, Australian/New Zealand Standards Committee CS/23 (1998 to 2002).
Member, Editorial Board for Steel Construction, China.
Fellow, American Society of Civil Engineers.
Fellow, Engineers Australia.
Fellow, International Institute for FRP in Construction.

Supervision:

Prof Zhao has supervised over 40 PhD students. He received Special Commendation, Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Postgraduate Supervision in 2006 and 2008.

 

Research Interests

  • Tubular Structures
  • Thin-Walled Structures
  • FRP Strengthening of Structures
  • FRP Construction

Research Projects

Current projects

ARC Raining Centre for Advanced Manufacturing of Prefabricated Housing

The ARC Training Centre for Advanced Manufacturing of Prefabricated Housing will train the next generation of industry professionals, enable industry, with world-leading research capability to develop and apply new materials,
processes and technologies that will create new products, processes and business models. These will enable the prefabricated building industry to produce innovative, high value, high knowledge and customer specific building products required in future markets.

National Drop Weight Impact Testing Facility

The seven Australian universities named in this proposal aim to develop a ‘national drop weight impact testing
facility’ for dynamic tests on geo- and construction materials and systems. This facility will provide state-of-the art
technology to observe the real time behaviour of elements and sub-assemblies under combined quasi-static and
impact loading. The large capacity and unique configuration of the facility make it feasible to carry out innovative
research in impact engineering. Applications include, but are not limited to, the structural safety of high impact risk
infrastructure including railway networks, tunnels and bridges, and also the development of cost-effective and
environmentally friendly building and construction materials.

Behaviour of ultra-high strength double-skin composite tubular construction

This project will advance the knowledge of ultra-high strength steel tubes and double-skin composite tubular
members and connections. It will provide a design methodology to ensure confidence in the safety of critical
infrastructure, such as bridges, high rise buildings, hospitals, airports and subway stations, subjected to extreme events including fire, earthquake and impact related incidents.

Fatigue Strengthening of Metallic Bridges using Carbon Fibre Reinforced Polymer System

A large number of metallic structures such as bridges, offshore platforms and large mining equipment are
aging. Retrofitting such structures becomes more and more important in the 21st century. Using an
advanced material, CFRP (Carbon Fibre Reinforced Polymer), to strengthen metallic structures is very
promising. This project aims to develop reliable CFRP strengthening systems for aging metallic bridges. It will
make a breakthrough in understanding of the fatigue crack propagation in CFRP-metal composite system under combined loading. It will also produce practical guidelines for engineers to strengthen aging metallic
bridges.

Composite Tubular Construction Subject to Impact and Blast Loading

Composite tubular construction is widely used in critical infrastructure. Existing research has focused on its behaviour subject to static, fatigue, fire and earthquake loading. There is a lack of knowledge of such construction subjected to impact and blast loading, let alone progressive collapse. This project includes collaboration with the University of Toronto to utilize unique testing facilities for simulated and field blast tests. A rational 3D theoretical model will be developed to simulate the progressive collapse of composite tubular construction. The Australian and international community will benefit from this project which develops a confident design of critical infrastructure against extreme events.

Hybrid Construction using Seawater, Sea Sand and Fibre Reinforced Polymer

Conventional concrete is made using fresh water and river sand. This project aims to develop a novel hybrid
construction system to fully utilise seawater and sea sand, plus industrial waste, together with fibre reinforced
polymer (FRP) and stainless steel (SS), for use in civil engineering infrastructure under a marine environment. To
date there has been little work to understand the degradation kinetics and mechanisms of FRP and SS in such
complicated corrosive environments. The anticipated outcome of the Project is highly enhanced competitiveness
of the Australian manufacturing industry through an environmentally-friendly construction approach.

ARC Large 1997 - Dr X L Zhao

Past projects

Advanced Condition Assessment and Failure Prediction Technologies for Optimal Management of Critical Pipes ("Critical Pipes")

Durability of Carbon Fibre Reinforced Polymer (CFRP) Strengthened Steel Structures against Environment-Assisted Degradation

Large numbers of steel structures such as bridges, offshore platforms, large mining equipment’s and buildings are aging. Retrofitting such structures becomes more and more important in the 21st century. Using an advanced material, CFRP (Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer), to strengthen steel structures is very promising. This project investigates the durability of CFRP-steel system. It will make a breakthrough in understanding of the influence of environment conditions on the bond between CFRP and steel and the strengthening efficiency. It will not only provide reliable retrofitting of existing structures but also build safe, more economic and smarter steel construction.

Ultimate Capacity of Space Frames with Semi-Rigid Joints

Hybrid Testing Facility for Structures under Extreme Loads

The twelve Australian universities named in this proposal propose to develop a Hybrid Testing Facility (HTF)
for Structures under Extreme Loads. The LIEF proposal will facilitate the establishment of advanced testing
facility with access to the universities involved and to government and industry partners associated with
them. This next generation of structural testing will embrace hybrid testing in static, pseudo-dynamic and fast
modes and simulation of structures subjected to extreme loading events such as earthquakes, blast, impact,
fire, wind and ocean waves. Applications include structural safety of buildings, bridges, offshore structures,
mining structures and development of efficient renewable energy structures.

TEKTRONIX TDS3034C purchase

Welded Connections in Very High Strength (VHS) Steel Tubes

CFRP (Carbon Fibre Reinforced Polymer) Strengthening of Steel Structures

A large number of steel structures such as bridges, offshore platforms, large mining equipment and buildings are aging. Conventional repair or strengthening methods are inadequate and often prone to corrosion and fatigue. This research program will investigate the use of an advanced material, CFRP (Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer), to strengthen steel structures. It addresses the unique debonding mechanisms in CFRP-steel systems and develop techniques for enhancing local and member buckling resistance and fatigue performance. The outcome of the program will not only allow the confident retrofitting of existing structures but also lead to safer, more economic and smarter new structures.”,

To Present a Paper At the 8th International Symposium on Tubular Structures (ists) and to Present a Paper At the International Institute of Welding Xv-e Meeting, Singapore

Testing Facility for Heavily Loaded Bridge and Barrier Systems

Government and industry are increasing truck masses from current single articulated 42.5 tonne trucks to 160 tonne multi-bogie trucks. This will provide Australia with over $1 billion of potential benefits and an efficient and competitive transport industry. To capture these benefits and further progress Australia’s economy, considerable collaborative research on a number of fronts must be carried out to investigating how bridges and barriers can perform safely when subjected to very heavy traffic and impact loads under laboratory and typical service conditions. This application seeks funds for establishing a unique hi-tech testing facility in Australia vital for advancing such infrastructure technology.

Thin-walled(t<4 Mm) Duralgal Rhs Connections Under Fatigue Load

Two Invited Keynote Papers, 52nd Annual Assembly of the International Institute of Welding, Lison, Portugal

Retrofit of Steel Connections subject to Fatigue Load by Utilizing CFRP and Modified Epoxy Structural Adhesives

Large amount of steel structures in road and railway infrastructure, and in mining, transportation and recreation industries are subjected to fatigue loading. They need retrofitting when cracks occur or strengthening after construction to improve their fatigue life. This research project will investigate the use of an advanced material, CFRP (Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer) together with modified epoxy structural adhesives, for retrofitting steel structures subject to fatigue loading. The outcome will be a breakthrough in understanding the fatigue failure mechanism of CFRP-steel composite systems, an effective fatigue strengthening technique and a reliable fatigue assessment methodology for such systems.

Tubular Steel Members and Connections Under High Amplitude Dynamic Loading

Prediction and controlling of pipe failures in buried water and gas pipe systems

Australian buried water and gas pipe networks extend over hundred thousand kilometers. As these pipe systems age, pipe failures have also increased, leading to wastage of valuable commodity and increasing social and economic costs to the community. Effective pipe asset management tools are urgently needed to maintain reliable and safe supply of these essential services. There is clear evidence that pipe failures are significantly related to soil behavior influenced by seasonal climatic conditions. The current asset management models do not adequately consider these issues. This project will develop methodologies for predicting and controlling the failure of buried water and gas pipes for effective pipe asset management.

Fire Resistance of Tubular Steel Columns Filled With High Performance High Strength Concrete

Crashworthiness Behaviour of Roadside Furniture Utilising Thin-walled Structures.

Cold-Formed Tubular Connections under Fatigue Load

Thin-walled Structures Subjected to Impact and Blast Loading

Terrorist attacks have cost Australians much human grief and billions of dollars. Containing the consequences of a blast or impact is crucial to survival and restricting damage to critical civilian/defense infrastructure. Thin-walled structures are used extensively in such infrastructure. There is a lack of knowledge about their behavior when subjected to impulse and blast loads. The investigators will establish the most economical means of designing passive blast protection into thin-walled structures and hence, Australia’s critical infrastructure. This knowledge will be transferred into design standards and Australia’s limited defense resources.

Innovative tubular connections at elevated temperature

High strength steel protection bollards

Design of Welded Steel Tubular Connections

Steel tubes are widely used in building, road transportation, defense, recreation, and agriculture industries. The proposed program will develop static design procedures for welded tubular connections to ensure safe and economic structures. The program will also investigate the behavior of a popular tubular connection utilizing very high strength steel tubes to extend the existing design scope and enhance the utilization of Australian produced innovative tubular sections. The notch toughness of steel tubes will also be investigated to avoid fracture failure of welded connections under dynamic loading. The program will build strong ongoing collaboration between University of Toronto and Monash University.

Fatigue behaviour of dragline tubular structures

Subsea Pipelines Cluster - Structural Integrity

Debonding Failure in CFRP Strengthened Steel Structures.

Large number of steel structures such as bridges, offshore platforms, large mining equipment’s and buildings are aging. Retrofitting such structures becomes more and more important in the 21st century. The conventional repairing or strengthening method is inadequate and often prone to corrosion and fatigue. This research project will investigate the use of an advanced material, CFRP (Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer), to strengthen steel structures. It will address the unique nonbinding mechanism in CFRP-steel system. The outcome of the project will be not only confident retrofitting of existing structures but also safe, more economic and smarter new steel constructions.

Research Network for a Secure Australia (RNSA)

Publications

More than 580 publications including 8 books, 6 special issues and 3 conference proceedings, 290 refereed journal papers and 280 refereed conference papers.

A highly cited researcher in Civil Engineering discipline (Shanghai Ranking Consultancy and Elsevier in 2016). SCOPUS H-Index is 40.

Books

Zhao, X.L.(2013), FRP Strengthened Metallic Structures, Taylor & Francis, UK

Zhao, X.L., Han, L.H. and Lu, H. (2010), Concrete Filled Tubular Members and Connections, Taylor & Francis, UK

Wardenier, J., Packer, J.A. and Zhao, X.L. and van der Vegte, G.J. (2010), Hollow Sections in Structural Applications, Bouwen met Staal, The Netherlands

Wardenier, J. Kurobane, Y., Packer, J.A., van der Vegte, G.J. and Zhao, X.L. (2009), Design guide for circular hollow section (CHS) joints under predominantly static loading, CIDECT Design Guide No. 1, 2nd Edition, CIDECT, Geneva, Switzerland

Packer, J.A., Wardenier, J., Zhao, X.L., van der Vegte, G.J. and Kurobane, Y. (2009), Design guide for rectangular hollow section (RHS) joints under predominantly static loading, CIDECT Design Guide No. 3, 2nd Edition, CIDECT, Geneva, Switzerland

Zhao, X.L, Wilkinson, T. and Hancock, G.J. (2005), Cold-Formed Tubular Members and Connections, Elsevier Science Pty Ltd, Oxford, UK, available in English and Chinese.

Zhao, X.L., Herion, S., Packer, J.A., Puthli, R.S., Sedlacek, G., Weynand, K., Wardenier, J., Wingerde, A. van and Yeomans, N. (2001), Design Guide for Circular and Rectangular Hollow Section Joints under Fatigue Loading, Verlag TUV Rheinland GmbH, Cologne, Germany, available in English, French, German and Spanish.

Zhao, X. L. and Packer, J.A. (2000), IIW Recommended Fatigue Design Procedure for Welded Hollow Section Joints, Woodhead Publishing, Cambridge, UK

Special Issues in International Journals

Zhao, X.L., Al-Mahaidi, R., Bai, Y. and Smith, S.T. (2014), Advances in Structural Engineering An International Journal, Vol.17, Number 12, Multi-Science Publishing Company

Zhao, X.L. (2012), International Journal of Structural Stability and Dynamics, Vol.12, Number 1, World Scientific Publishing Company

Zhao, X.L.(2009), Thin-Walled Structures, Vol.47, Number 10, Elsevier Science Ltd

Zhao, X.L. and Grzebieta, R.H. (2002), Thin-Walled Structures, Vol.40, Number 2, Elsevier Science Ltd

Zhao, X.L. and Grzebieta, R.H. (2002), International Journal of Mechanical Sciences, Vol.44, Number 6, Elsevier Science Ltd

Zhao, X.L. and Grzebieta, R.H. (2002), International Journal of Impact Engineering, Vol.27, Number 9, Elsevier Science Ltd

Peer-Reviewed Journal Papers

See Google Scholar

A highly cited researcher in Civil Engineering discipline (Shanghai Ranking Consultancy and Elsevier in 2016).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Research Grants:

Over $20 million, including 25 ARC (Australian Research Council) Grants.

Teaching Commitments

  • CIV3221 - Building Structures and Technology
  • CIV2225 - Steel and Timber Structures
Last modified: May 16, 2018