Human-centred mobile and multimodal interfaces

Professor Sharon Oviatt

Supervisor

Professor Sharon Oviatt, HCI Director

Professor Oviatt is an internationally recognised pioneer in next-generation interfaces, especially mobile and multimodal interfaces, educational interfaces, communications interfaces, spoken and pen-centric interfaces, ubiquitous computing, and data analytics for analysing cognition and health. She is an ACM Fellow, ACM SIGCHI Academy member, and recipient of the ACM ICMI Sustained Accomplishment Award.

  • Be part of an expanding HCI group of faculty, postdoctoral fellows, and students
  • Participate in designing and developing new technologies not yet envisioned
  • Engage in hands-on projects in our lab, corporate internships, or fieldwork at Monash’s international locations
  • Achieve excellence at a top 100 university, the largest IT faculty and university in Australia.

Project title

Human-centred mobile and multimodal interfaces

The dominant paradigm for interacting with computers now involves new media and multimodal input on cell phones, which involves speech, multi-touch, writing, gestures, images, gaze, and sensors. These new interfaces provide better support for human performance than keyboards, and they are proliferating rapidly on everything from smart watches to automobiles.

The Opportunity for PhD Students

Exceptionally initiating and talented students are invited to pursue a PhD in HCI and creative technologies. Students will have the opportunity to join an expanding HCI group with expertise in state-of-the-art areas such as: human-centred interfaces, mobile and wearable interfaces, natural multimodal interfaces (speech, writing, images, touch), agent-based conversational interfaces, multimodal-multisensor interfaces, data analytics for predicting user cognition and health, and brain-computer and adaptive interfaces.

Graduate research scholarships are available for full-time domestic or international PhD students to join the HCI group.

International students can receive tuition waivers and overseas health cover for the enrolling student. A relocation allowance is available for eligible students. Students will learn broad skills in next-generation human-centred interfaces, a rapidly growing area with job opportunities in international corporations and universities.

Graduate research scholarship application deadlines are March 31 or August 31 for international students and May 31 or October 31 for domestic Australian students.

The Candidate Requirements:

Candidates need to be eligible to undertake a PhD in the Faculty of IT at Monash University. Please check your eligibility on the How to apply page and if you meet the criteria please submit an Expression of Interest.

Read more:

Human-centred mobile and multimodal interfaces

The dominant paradigm for interacting with computers now involves new media and multimodal input on cell phones, which involves speech, multi-touch, writing, gestures, images, gaze, and sensors. These new interfaces provide better support for human performance than keyboards, and they are proliferating rapidly on everything from smart watches to automobiles.

Exceptionally initiating and talented students are invited to pursue a PhD in HCI and creative technologies. Students will have the opportunity to join an expanding HCI group with expertise in state-of-the-art areas such as: human-centred interfaces, mobile and wearable interfaces, natural multimodal interfaces (speech, writing, images, touch), agent-based conversational interfaces, multimodal-multisensor interfaces, data analytics for predicting user cognition and health, and brain-computer and adaptive interfaces. The HCI group designs, builds, and evaluates state-of-the-art computer interface technologies. It has multidisciplinary interests spanning computer science and engineering, cognitive and learning sciences, communications, medicine and health, media design, and other topics.

Starting during the 2018 academic year, Dr. Oviatt is especially interested in supervising student PhD projects on these research topics:

  1. Predicting user cognition or health status, based on analysing patterns during natural communication and behaviour. Data would be collected and analysed involving human speech, writing, images and physical activity patterns. This research topic is relevant to building skills in behavioural data analytics and multimodal interfaces and systems. The ideal candidate would have an interest in developing new technologies to identify significant issues in users’ cognitive and health status (e.g., learning progress during education, presence of neurodegenerative disease), and using this information to develop personalized and adaptive interfaces that promote learning, performance, and health. He/she would be an initiating student, who is interested in building skills and participating in pioneering research in these rapidly emerging technology areas.
  2. Designing mobile multimodal interfaces for expressing languages that are not Roman alphabetic ones (e.g., Mandarin, Hindi, Japanese). The aim is to design new interfaces with greater expressive power and flexibility than keyboard input, which can substantially improve support for human performance. This project may involve fieldwork and data collection with the relevant native speakers. The ideal candidate would have an interest in developing new communication technologies, be a native speaker of one relevant language, and have a background and interests in computing, IT, HCI, and linguistics. He/she would be an initiating and independent student, who is interested in multidisciplinary teamwork and emerging international markets.
  3. Spoken and multimodal dialogue systems, especially ones that promote users’ safety and management of cognitive load during in-vehicle use. One aim would be to redesign system capabilities when user-car exchanges are too lengthy or error-prone, which causes driver distraction. This project would involve teamwork, data collection and analysis, and speech or multimodal interface design. It would involve teamwork, including with corporate and/or federal partners. The ideal candidate would have an interest in speech, linguistic analysis, and individual differences involving low- and high-risk drivers. He/she would be an initiating student, who is interested in corporate job opportunities involving agent-based conversational technologies that are currently in very high demand

Contact:

Email:  sharon.oviatt@monash.edu