Meet our HDR community

Monash University has a proud tradition of research excellence, and is committed to providing the highest quality of graduate research education.

At the Faculty of Law, our Higher Degree by Research (HDR) students are making valuable contributions to the body of legal knowledge through their extensive research projects.

Here you can find and connect with members of our HDR community at Monash Law.

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Yohannes Eneyew Ayalew

Yohannes Eneyew Ayalew

Higher Degree by Research, Castan Centre

Why is your research important?

African countries have experienced a steady growth in Internet penetration from 0.78% in 2000 to 43% in 2020. An estimated 590 million Africans now have access to Internet. These figures show that millions of Africans are getting online and using the Internet for varying purposes, including expression of their ideas and views. Yet, while the Internet has opened new frontiers of freedom of expression, it is also eroding protections for privacy, necessitating a balance between the two rights. Balancing of rights is a long-standing debate in human rights law discourse. It has regained traction in wake of tensions between competing human rights (e.g., freedom of expression and privacy) that has been made worse by the Internet and social media platforms. The African human rights system provides a normative framework for the protections of freedom of expression and privacy on the Internet in its different instruments. Using doctrinal and comparative legal research methods, this research explores how the freedom of expression and the right to privacy are balanced within the African human rights system. Specifically, the research examines two issues that of major concern in Africa when it comes to human rights in the digital space: publication of personal information, and the right to be forgotten.

Areas of expertise:

Internet freedom, the Right to be Forgotten, Privacy, Freedom of Expression, Intermediary Liability, Content Moderation, Internet Shutdowns, Hate Speech Regulation, Media Law, Human Right in the Digital Age, African Human Rights System, International Human Rights Law, TWAIL and Public International Law.


Paige Darby

Paige Darby

Higher Degree by Research

Why is your research important?

The thesis will identify and evaluate mechanisms aimed at building community confidence in sentencing in Victoria. It will interrogate whether community views are being properly invoked in the public policy debate by building an evidence-base of the capacity for reforms to shape community confidence. I am to build a theory of community confidence that supports a model of influence which appropriately harnesses community views while ensuring sentencing reform has a solid policy and evidence base.

Areas of expertise:

Sentencing, Sentencing; Criminal Law; Law Reform; Public Policy


Christopher Nyinevi

Christopher Nyinevi

CLARS, Castan Centre, Higher Degree by Research

Why is your research important?

The thesis examines the liability of a foreign investor under international law for the harms that an investment project or the investor’s conduct may cause to local communities in the host country of the investor. It aims to develop a legal theory by which foreign investors (mostly corporations) may be held accountable, within international law, for investment-related injuries to host state communities.

Areas of expertise:

Public international law, International Economic Law, African Union Law, Human Rights


Duncan Wallace

Duncan Wallace

CLARS, Higher Degree by Research

Why is your research important?

Duncan Wallace’s doctoral research is about the history and philosophy of corporate legal personhood. He is particularly interested in the ‘natural entity’ theory – or ‘organic’ theory – of the corporation, which understands the corporation as a kind of organism.

Supervisors:

Dr Joanna Kyriakakis, Julian Sempill

Areas of expertise:

Corporate law, legal philosophy; co-operatives; legal personality; legal history


Estelle Wallingford

Estelle Wallingford

CLARS, Castan Centre, Higher Degree by Research

Why is your research important?

Ms Wallingford’s thesis explores how artificially intelligent machine learning systems should be characterised under the law. Her research further considers who should be held legally liable for the actions of, or consequences arising from the use of these systems.

Areas of expertise:

Artificial intelligence, AI, machine learning, liability, obligations, legal personhood