Dr Naomi Stead

HEAD OF DEPARTMENT ARCHITECTURE AND PROFESSOR

Dr Naomi Stead is Professor of Architecture in the Department of Architecture at Monash, Research Leader at Hayball and an Adjunct Professor in the School of Architecture at the University of Queensland.

Her research interests lie broadly in the architectural humanities and the cultural studies of architecture: in its cultures of production, reproduction, mediation and reception. She holds a Bachelor of Architecture from the University of South Australia and a PhD from the University of Queensland. Her doctoral thesis, ‘On the Object of the Museum and its Architecture,’ examined the cultural politics of architecture in recent social history museums. Current research projects examine experimental writing practices in architecture, gender equity in architecture, oral history as a disruptive method in architectural research and the representation of architecture and architects in popular media.

Stead was the leader of the 2010-2014 ARC Linkage project ‘Equity and Diversity in the Australian Architecture Profession: Women, Work and Leadership,’ and as part of that was co-founder with Justine Clark and others of Parlour, an activist group advocating for greater gender equity in architecture. She was a co-author of the award-winning Parlour Guides to Equitable Practice, co-curator of the exhibition Portraits of Practice: At Work in Architecture and she is an associate editor of the Parlour website.

Stead is widely published as an art and architectural critic in Australia, having written more than 50 commissioned feature and review articles in professional magazines over the last decade. In 2008 she was awarded the Adrian Ashton Prize for architectural writing by the NSW chapter of the Australian Institute of Architects. She is an architecture columnist for The Conversation, writing about architectural culture and issues for a generalist audience;, and is also a columnist for Places Journal, where she writes broad-based essays on concepts and mythologies within and without architecture.


Naomi Stead