5. Clinical Programs Placements

This section provides information about the placements component of the Clinical Doctoral programs. All students are required to read and be familiar with this information prior to commencing their placements. The answers to most placement-related issues can be found in this section.

5.1 Background

Placements are recognised as an essential component in the training of professional psychologists. They are designed to provide students with a range of experience and skills that will equip them for working as a clinical psychologist. To ensure that placements are conducted in a manner that provides appropriate experience for students, various guidelines have been developed by the University, APAC (the Australian Psychology Accreditation Council), the APS (Australian Psychological Society) College of Clinical Neuropsychologists/College of Clinical Psychologists and the PBA (Psychology Board of Australia).

5.2 Aims

The aim of placements is to provide students with the opportunity to develop professional competence in a work context. Competencies include mastery of a number of skills, including the ability to apply academic training to placement problems, and the development of a critical appreciation of the roles and functions of psychologists in organisations. During placements, it is expected that students will develop a range of core and specialist competencies as described by the APS College of Clinical Psychologists (http://www.psychology.org.au/academic/course-approval/) and APS College of Clinical Neuropsychologists . For instance, students should learn and apply skills in neuropsychological assessment, interpretation and evidence-based interventions to a range of individuals, families, and/or groups. Students will observe and take part in assessments and interventions in various services and organisations under the supervision of a clinical neuropsychologist who is also a member of (or is eligible for membership of) the APS College of Clinical Neuropsychologists.

5.3 Contacts

The University is required to appoint a Placement Coordinator who is responsible for: liaising between the University and the field Supervisors, assisting students with the process of arranging clinical placements, monitoring student progress during placements, and ensuring that the paperwork has been completed properly. The Placement Coordinator or another academic appointee will visit each placement at least once while the student is on placement, generally midway through for the mid-placement review. Students will not receive a final grade for their placement until all placement paperwork has been reviewed by the Placement Coordinator.

Placement Coordinator, PhD Clinical Psychology  - Dr James Courtney
Monash Psychology Centre
Building 1, 270 Ferntree Gully Rd, Notting Hill 3168 
Ph: +61 3 9902 0873
E: ClinPsychPlacements.psych@monash.edu

Placement Coordinator, PhD Clinical Neuropsychology - Dr Chris Hutchison
Wednesday and Thursday
18 Innovation Walk, Clayton Campus 3800
Ph: +61 3 9905 9440
E: chris.hutchison@monash.edu

Placement Administrator, Postgraduate Programs - Amelia Morrison
Graduate Programs Office
Level 4, 18 Innovation Walk, Clayton Campus 3800
Ph: +61 3 9902 4163
E: hdr.psych@monash.edu

The Placement Administrator is responsible for administration activities associated with the placement program. Placement documentation should be submitted to InPlace. Please ensure that you submit documents to the correct placement unit.

5.4 Process

5.4.1 Pre-placement

Students are required to complete the following paperwork and/or read the following documentation immediately upon enrolment into the Clinical course, well before commencing their first placement:

5.4.1.1 Provisional Registration

Provisional Registration is a legal requirement to practice psychology. The Psychology Board of Australia (PBA) keeps a register of psychologists, processes applications for registration as a psychologist, investigates complaints and takes disciplinary action where appropriate. They operate within the Australian Health Practitioner Regulation Agency (AHPRA) and are generally concerned with protection of the public, upholding standards of practice within the profession, maintaining public confidence in the profession, regulating the practice of Psychologists, and publishing and distributing information concerning relevant Acts. Upon enrolment in the Clinical Doctoral program, and before students commence their first placement, they must be registered as a provisional psychologist with the PBA.

Completion of this application can be onerous and often requires a considerable input of time. As a requirement of the Clinical Doctoral programs, students must have provisional registration. This process should be commenced as soon as  a student enrols into the course. It is the responsibility of the student to maintain provisional registration for the duration of the course. Students who allow their registration to lapse will not be able to attend placements. A copy of the application form for provisional registration (APRO- APRO-76) is available from the PBA website: http://www.psychologyboard.gov.au/Registration/Forms.aspx

As a Provisional Psychologist, students must act in accordance with codes of ethical and professional conduct as outlined in the APS Code of Ethics which has been adopted by the PBA for the psychology profession. Students should also familiarise themselves with the Health Practitioner Regulation National Law Act 2009.  A copy of Act is available at: http://www.ahpra.gov.au/Legislation-and-Publications/Legislation.aspx.

When you have received confirmation of your registration please submit it to InPlace.

5.4.1.2 APAC

APAC is a joint committee of members of the PBA and the APS who set the standards for accreditation of Australasian psychology programs. The accreditation process ensures that standards of university training are maintained and remain rigorous. Students must complete accredited courses to be eligible for registration as a psychologist. APAC Accreditation Standards ensure that standards of university training in psychology are maintained and remain rigorous. Section 5 of the June 2010 Accreditation standards details the requirements for Postgraduate Professional Courses. The full document can be viewed at: https://www.psychologycouncil.org.au/sites/default/files/public/Standards_Rules_2010_Jun_APAC_Accreditation_for%20_Psychology_Courses_v10.pdf

New standards will come into effect from 1 January 2019. These can be viewed at: https://www.psychologycouncil.org.au/sites/default/files/public/APAC_Evidence_Guide_2019_Jan_Version_for_Online_Publishing_Single.pdf

5.4.1.3 APS

Clinical Students - The APS College of Clinical Psychologists represent the interests of the profession. Since the  Doctor of Psychology in Clinical Psychology and Doctor of Philosophy (Clinical Psychology) degrees are accredited and monitored by the APS College of Clinical Psychologists as well as APAC, these requirements must be met by all staff and students. The Clinical College utilises a competency framework. Students should familiarise themselves with the APS College of Clinical Psychologists Course Approval Guidelines.

Clinical Neuro Students - The APS College of Clinical Neuropsychologists (CCN) represent the interests of the neuropsychology profession. Since the Doctor of Psychology in Clinical Neuropsychology and Doctor of Philosophy (Clinical Neuropsychology) degrees are accredited and monitored by the CCN as well as APAC, these requirements must be met by all staff and students. The CCN have also outlined competencies for practising neuropsychologists. Students should familiarise themselves with the  (broken link) and the APS College of Clinical Neuropsychology Specialist Competencies: Specification of areas of specialist knowledge and skills.

5.4.1.4 Police Check

Before students are permitted to undertake any placement, a Police check is required. The School has an agreement with Fit2work to ensure that students have a current check. You will receive an email from Fit2work advising you of the process. The check costs $19.90 (check on cost) and is valid for 12 months. Please ensure that you have 100 points of certified ID ready to upload with the application. Once you have received your police check, please upload it to InPlace. Police checks are required annually.

5.4.1.5 Working with Children Check (WWC)

All students undertaking their placements in the state of Victoria must have a valid Working with Children Check. This needs to be completed prior to your first placement even if this is not a paediatric placement as adult services often have contact with clients less than 18 years of age. There is no fee for students as you come under the volunteer category. 

Students need to apply online http://www.workingwithchildren.vic.gov.au/. Please use the following values to complete the online application form:

Type of application”Volunteer” (no fee)
Organisation details

School of Psychological Sciences Placement Administrator

Bld 1, 270 Ferntree Gully Rd Notting Hill, VIC, 3168, Phone: (03) 9902 4163

Occupational Work code40 Counselling or other support services for children

Take the completed but unsigned form, a passport photo, and 100 points of ID to a participating postal outlet. It can take up to 2 months to obtain the WWC card so please apply for this in your first year in the course, well before your first placement.

If you already have a valid WWC Check, please ensure that you complete the Notification of Change of Personal Details form on the WWC Website. This must be done within 21 days of course commencement or financial penalties may occur.

Once you have received your WWC Check please upload it to InPlace.

5.4.1.6 Immunisation

Students need to comply with the faculty Mandatory Compliance requirements before attending any placements. Students must complete the Monash University Immunisation Record Form and Flu Immunisation Record Form. Please see: https://www.monash.edu/medicine/study/student-services/mandatory-compliance

Students are required to upload these forms to InPlace during their first year in the course to be eligible to attend placement in second year.

Influenza vaccinations are required annually.

5.4.2 Arranging placements

The Clinical Doctoral programs have established a network of placements in a variety of settings. The table below lists some of the agencies in which Clinical students may undertake their placements. This list is not comprehensive but demonstrates the diversity that is available. There are several postgraduate psychology programs operating in Victoria, which creates challenges in finding placements for students as most of the services and organisations that provide placements have their own application procedures and selection processes. Given the complexity and often the anxiety-provoking nature of this task, it is very important for students to discuss their preferences with the placement coordinator early so they can collaborate on the best way to obtain the placement that they want.

Placement agencies must have staff that can provide supervision to Clinical Doctoral students. All supervisors are selected on the basis of their experience in clinical psychology and clinical neuropsychology and their skill in training students. In general field supervisors must have:

  • full registration with the PBA and
  • be a member, or eligible for membership, of the APS College of Clinical Neuropsychologists/APS College of Clinical Psychologists and
  • a senior member of staff (P3 or above). In some situations, field supervisors will be supplemented with supervision by Monash staff members

All supervisors must provide Monash University with their curriculum vitae to keep on file according to APAC guidelines.

Placement Organisations

PhD Clinical PsychologyPhD Clinical Neuropsychology
Austin Health (health, clinical)Angliss Hospital (rehabilitation, geriatrics, psychiatry)
Royal Children's Hospital Consultation LiaisonAlfred Hospital (medical, neurology, psychiatry)
Monash Psychology Centre (clinical)Forensicare (forensic psychiatry, rehabilitation, geriatrics)
 Grace McKellar Centre – Geelong (rehabilitation, neurology, medical)
Peninsula Community Mental Health Service (clinical)John Lindell Rehabilitation Centre – Bendigo (rehabilitation, medical, geriatric)
Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre (clinical, health)Kingston Centre (geriatrics, medical, rehabilitation)
The Albert Road Clinic Maroondah Hospital (psychiatry, neurology)
Royal Children's Hospital GateHouse CASAMelbourne Neuropsychiatry Centre, Royal Melbourne Hospital (psychiatry, neurology)
Southern Health Adult Mental Health Services (clinical)Monash Medical Centre (paediatric)
Southern Health Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services (clinical, child)Multiple Sclerosis Society (multiple sclerosis)
Eastern Health Aged Psychiatry UnitNeuropsychology Clinic, Monash Psychology Centre (medical, neurology, psychiatry, paediatrics)
The Alfred Hospital (clinical)ORYGEN (psychiatry)
Task Force Drug and AlcoholOsborn, Sloan and Associates (rehabilitation)
Turning Point Alcohol and Drug Centre (clinical)Paediatric Allied Health Unit, Sunshine Hospital (paediatric)
 Victorian Rehab CentrePeter James Centre and Wantirna Health (geriatric, medical, rehabilitation)
 Melbourne DBT CentreRoyal Children’s Hospital - Psychology Department (paediatric)
 Epworth HospitalRoyal Children’s Hospital – Learning Differences Centre (paediatric)
 Berry Street - Take 2Royal Melbourne Hospital, Royal Park (geriatrics, rehabilitation, medical)
 Delmont Private HospitalRoyal Talbot Rehabilitation Centre (rehabilitation)
 Western Health Community RehabilitationSouthern Health Early Life Mental Health Service (paediatric, psychiatry)
 Cabrini Psycho-oncologySunshine Hospital (medical, rehabilitation, psychiatry, geriatrics)
 Monash Memory Skills GroupSunshine Neurodevelopmental Clinic (paediatrics, psychiatry)
 HeadspaceSt George’s Hospital (aged psychiatry, geriatrics)
 Calvary BethlehemSt Vincent's Mental Health Service (adult psychiatry, neurology)
 The Victorian Rehabilitation Centre (adult and paediatric rehabilitation).
 The Melbourne Clinic (adult psychiatry, neurology, geriatrics)
 Turning Point Alcohol and Drug Centre (Psychiatry)
 Alcohol Related Brain Injury Assessment Service (arbias) (neurology, psychiatry)
 Austin Health (neurology, medical, psychiatry, geriatrics, paediatric)
 Casey Hospital (rehabilitation, geriatric)
 Epworth Rehabilitation (rehabilitation)

Doctor of Psychology (Clinical Neuropsychology) and Doctor of Philosophy (Clinical Neuropsychology) Students - The Placement Coordinator will select and organise placements for students with the aim of giving students experience in a broad range of areas. Students are not permitted to negotiate their own placement or change any placement arrangements without first obtaining approval from the University Placement Coordinator. Student preferences for placement locations will be considered but are not guaranteed. Students can consult the prior list of placement organisations for ideas. Ideally, student placements will cover the following settings: acute neurology/neurosurgery, rehabilitation, psychiatric, geriatric and paediatric.

The Placement Coordinator will contact students towards the end of the year to inform them of their placements for the following year. Students will then need to contact their nominated supervisor to introduce themselves, discuss a commencement date, and days/hours of work. Apart from days of the week that students have coursework (normally Wednesdays and Fridays), students are expected to have the flexibility to attend placement on any other weekday. Other things to discuss when first contacting your supervisor include: directions and car parking arrangements, recommended reading, and clinical tests that are likely to be used.

The Neuropsychology Clinic is a relatively new service of the Monash Psychology Centre and is operated by the School of Psychological Sciences at Monash University.  It provides Doctor of Psychology in Clinical Neuropsychology and Doctor of Philosophy (Clinical Neuropsychology) students with a well-supported placement opportunity, and the community with low-cost and up-to-date assessment and management recommendations for cognitive difficulties.
Children, adolescents and adults may be referred for neuropsychological assessment of cognitive difficulties associated with a range of aetiologies, for example:

  • Neurological injury (e.g. traumatic brain injury, concussion, stroke, neurosurgery)
  • Deteriorating cognitive function in older adults
  • Learning difficulties
  • Developmental difficulties

Referrals may come from health practitioners, general community agencies or the individuals themselves. There will generally be a number of students from different year levels on placement at the Clinic at the same time and students are encouraged to participate in group supervision sessions across course years to maximise learning opportunities.

Neuropsychology Clinic Lead, Dr Cathy Willmott, is a Clinical Neuropsychologist and Lecturer in neuropsychology with many years of experience. Cathy is responsible for the operation of the clinic and supervision of students on placement. The clinic is located within the Omnico Business Centre, 1/270 Ferntree Gully Road, Notting Hill, 3168. PH: 9902 4480.

Doctor of Psychology in Clinical Psychology and Doctor of Philosophy (Clinical Psychology) Students - In order to take students’ prior experience, skills, and interests into account for the initial and subsequent placements, students must complete the Placement Preferences Form and submit it along with their CV to the Placement Coordinator during the first semester of the course. Ideally, placements will occur in a range of settings including an adult setting, a child setting, an inpatient setting, and an outpatient setting. It is strongly recommended that students arrange a meeting with the Placement Coordinator to discuss their preferences in more detail. Student preferences will be taken into account; however, there is a high likelihood that students will be allocated to placements that they have not chosen due to limitations in availability. Also, students are encouraged to inform the Placement Coordinator if they are aware of any possible placements that are not currently being offered by the Clinical Doctoral program.

As noted earlier, the initial placement is allocated to students by the Placement Coordinator. Most students will be allocated to the Monash Psychology Centre (MPC) and a few students will be allocated to external services. Students will generally apply for Intermediate placements (Semester 1, Year 2) as early as August in the year they commenced the course and will apply for Advanced Placements as early as March in Year 2 of the course.

After discussion with the Placement Coordinator, the student will generally choose three agencies to apply to and the application procedures for the service will be supplied by the Placement Coordinator. It is the responsibility of the student to adhere to the specific processes of the agencies, to supply an appropriate cover letter and a CV to the agencies, and to meet the application deadlines. Some services prefer if the Placement Coordinator submits student applications all at once and others prefer for students to apply directly so students must ensure that they are following the proper procedures.

The Placement Coordinator may assist students with cover letters and CVs should students need some guidance. See “Tips for Writing Cover Letters”. The service will generally contact students to notify them if they have been short-listed for an interview. Unfortunately, various services do not coordinate their interviewing schedules, some not holding their interviews until early December, so it is important to be patient during this process. Students should prepare for the interview as they would for a job application. Be prepared to discuss previous skills, experience, and interests and expectations for the placement. Expressing enthusiasm will be of benefit! Areas of clarification during the interview with a potential Supervisor are:

  • What specific project(s) and/or clinical experiences are available?
  • What organisational resources are available to assist in completing these specific projects (e.g., access to computers, copiers, introductions to other departments)?
  • What potential skills and experience will be gained from this placement (especially with regard to competencies of clinical psychologists)?
  • In general, what days and times are required to attend placement?

It is important to notify the Placement Coordinator of progress during the application process. Specifically, students should email the Placement Coordinator when they have applied to a service, when the service has contacted students regarding an interview, and when the service has or has not offered students a placement. Generally students will be successful in obtaining a placement; however, if this does not occur, the Placement Coordinator needs to know as soon as possible to ensure the student is placed.

When students have been offered a placement, it is their responsibility to contact their Supervisor prior to commencement of their placement. The aim of this initial contact is to introduce themselves and to discuss days of attendance, expected work hours and the specific start date. Other useful topics of discussion include: directions and car parking arrangements, recommended reading, and clinical tests that are likely to be used.

5.4.3 During placement

Placement Workload

You should be able to make a genuine contribution to the work of the agency, but this may take a little time. You need to get an understanding of how the agency operates first, and it is expected that you will largely take an observational role in the first few weeks. If, after this time you have concerns about how you are spending your time and what you are contributing to the agency, please raise this with your supervisor or Placement Coordinator. Remember, however, that agencies are all different and the number of clients seen across placements will vary.

Placement activities should generally be completed within the allotted placement time, however, at times students may need to complete work outside of placement hours.  Reports and notes should be done on time. This is particularly important when you are only attending the placement a few days per week. Reports need to be prepared with sufficient time for changes to be made.

Client Contact

This contact may be in the form of individual or group work and may be with or without a supervisor present. Client contact typically starts slowly at the start of the placement and increases as the placement progresses. More advanced placements tend to involve more face to face work. Students should therefore not be too concerned if in the initial stages of their placement program their client contact is less than 2-3 hours per day.

  • Clinical Neuropsychology students are required to see a minimum of 50 cases across their placement program. Ideally, students will have approximately 2-3 hours of face to face client contact per day although this can vary across placements.
  • Clinical students are required to have face to face client contact for a period of approximately 3¼ hours per day (assuming a 7.5 hour day).

Supervision

Supervision should involve on average one hour of direct contact for each full day of placement.

This may be in the form of direct supervision of the student carrying out activities to discussion of placement activities, cases and reports. It can also include group supervision although at least 50% of supervision should be individual. Not all supervision has to be with the primary Supervisor, it can be with another eligible clinical Supervisor. All other supervision should be discussed with the primary Supervisor. It is important to log all Supervisory activities.

In addition, students are required to have other regular contact with the Supervisor (e.g. attending case conferences, ward rounds). Clinical ward rounds and PD activity on placements (including case conferences) do not satisfy criteria for clinical supervision hours. If clinical review is part of small group supervision it will satisfy criteria for small group supervision. If students are not receiving the appropriate amount of supervision, they should discuss the matter with their Supervisor or the Placement Coordinator.

The student should discuss with their Supervisor their expectations of supervision including the timing and structure of sessions. Generally, Supervisors will schedule a regular time to catch up with students for individual supervision. Although most Supervisors will be happy to answer some questions out of scheduled supervision sessions, this should be limited to more significant issues. Judge the appropriateness and urgency of questions and try to save more minor questions or issues for scheduled supervision sessions. If students are sharing office space with their Supervisor, avoid the temptation of asking minor questions of them because they are close.

Demands on the student are expected to increase as the student advances through the Clinical Doctoral program. Supervision in the initial placements would consist of direct supervision of the activities of the placement. As the student progresses through the program, supervision should incorporate discussion of case planning and development of the role that the agency plays in service delivery. Supervisors need to take the student‘s level of experience into account when deciding on the expectations of the student in the placement.

Students should make the most of their supervision sessions, using them as a forum to discuss cases, consolidate knowledge, learn new techniques, attend to process issues as well as content, present challenges as well as successes, address personal responses to clients, supervision and ways personal values have been challenged or affirmed, obtain support and strengthen confidence. During these sessions they should gain a thorough understanding of a psychologist‘s role and how it compares and functions with other professionals. Students are expected to bring ideas and hypotheses about clients and other issues to supervision, and should not expect supervisors to just provide answers to problems. Supervisors are entitled to expect students to do some reading about issues related to cases. Supervision should also be a forum for addressing issues such as your personal response to a client and your struggles with coping with the information you are receiving from the client. In this way supervision also has a debriefing role.

The following points have been identified by past students as characterising valuable supervision and may serve as a guide for the Supervisory relationship.

The supervisor should:

  • Establish the student‘s role with the organisation clearly, including details of the work expected.
  • Provide an appropriate orientation including giving background information about the agency and its functions, the type of clients and problems seen, professional and administrative procedures, emergency procedures, the physical layout of the facility and an introduction to other relevant staff members
  • Provide the student with an appropriate clinical psychology caseload.
  • Provide an opportunity for the student to observe the Supervisor, and other staff where appropriate.
  • Invite students to participate in team meetings that involve professional and clinical issues and analysis.
  • Provide theoretical background/material when necessary
  • Orient the student to common assessment/testing instruments and procedures in the agency and provide guidance in interpretation and report writing.
  • Guide students to relevant literature and professional development opportunities that will assist them to execute their role more effectively.
  • Assist the student in writing reports and provide detailed feedback regarding report writing where appropriate.
  • Provide detailed, honest and supportive feedback on a regular basis of all aspects—highlighting both strengths and areas for improvement—of the student’s performance during the placement.
  • Develop a relationship with the student that facilitates frank and open discussion of weaknesses, difficulties and potential problems.

Inability to attend Placement

If you are unable to attend placement for any reason please advise your supervisor as soon as possible. If you are unwell it is probably wise to stay away from placement. If you are absent for more than two days from a given placement you must provide written documentation, such as medical certificates, to your placement supervisor and the university Placement Coordinator. You also need to talk with the Placement Coordinator before taking any leave during a placement.

PC Facilities and Electronic Storage on Placement

Students will normally be allowed access to a computer on placement in order to write reports. Some students take their own laptops with them on placements to write reports but please be careful to secure laptops.  It is unlikely the placement organisation will take any responsibility for a laptop if it were stolen. Depending on the placement, students may be allowed access to internet and email facilities; however, students should use these for work purposes only. Students should discuss policies on the electronic storage of reports including use of personal USB sticks to store patient reports with their Supervisors. If allowed to store reports electronically students must ensure that all identifying data in reports are removed and/or password protected in client-related documents.  See below for guidelines on de-identifying documents.

Social Media

Students are encouraged to review their use of social media (e.g., Facebook, Twitter) and other online services once they are in the course. As training professionals, it is important to consider what information of yours is accessible to the public as it is not uncommon for clients and employers to look up individuals. As a psychologist, it is undesirable for clients to have access to your personal information that is commonly available on sites like Facebook (e.g., places you go, people you know etc.), and in rare instances could place you at risk. It is not appropriate to befriend clients on Facebook. If you are a member of Facebook and/or social media sites, we would strongly recommend that your privacy settings are set so that your information is not accessible to the public. For further information, see the University Social Media Policy.

Professional & Ethical Conduct

As Provisional Psychologists, Clinical Doctoral students are required to act in a professional and ethical manner. All students should familiarise themselves and act in accordance with the Code of Ethics published by the Australian Psychological Society and the Health Practitioner Regulation National Law Act 2009 published by the Psychology Board of Australia. Students should also ask their supervisor if there are policies specific to their placement organisation that they need to be aware of regarding professional and ethical behaviour.

The following outlines some of the issues students are likely to face in placements relating to professional and ethical conduct:

  1. Student as compared to Employee Role
    Students have a special place in the team. While they may carry some of the workload they are not seen as full members of the team. Make your role as a student clear to other professionals and clients. Be careful not to provide a “professional opinion” without prior consultation with your supervisor.
  2. Responsibility to your Supervisor
    As a Provisional Psychologist, your supervisor is responsible for all of your activities on placement. Therefore it is important you always keep your supervisor informed about your activities and any issues that arise. At times you may have a different opinion to your supervisor – this is normal and can be discussed in supervision sessions, however, your supervisor has the final word on clinical issues. Sometimes other professional staff will be unclear about your role as a student and may ask you to perform inappropriate tasks or tasks that are additional to those set by your supervisor and of which he/she is unaware. Keep your supervisor aware of these situations as they arise. Usually it is best to ask other staff members who present you with work to go through your supervisor.
    Across your placements, you will find that no two supervisors are the same. Although you will connect with some supervisors more easily than others, you should show appropriate respect for all supervisors and what they offer you on placement.
  3. Respect for other Professionals
    Respect for others professional training is essential. There may be times, however, when you do not receive appropriate respect in return. Because of your role in the hierarchy it is sometimes easy for students to accept inappropriately disrespectful behaviour directed towards them. Be prepared to discuss instances that concern you with your supervisor or Placement Coordinator.
  4. Agency Culture
    Try to gain an understanding of the culture of the agency. While there may be aspects of it you do not agree with, as a student you should not expect to be able to make changes to the culture. Try to fit in to the culture as much as is reasonable without compromising your values, i.e., wearing appropriate dress, participation in the social life of the agency. Be polite to staff and patients at all times. If you feel uncomfortable about the culture, try to work out the basis of the problems. Seek help from your placement supervisor or Placement Coordinator if necessary.
  5. Representing yourself as a Provisional Psychologist
    When introducing yourself to clients you should clearly indicate that you are a Provisional Psychologist who is training under the supervision of a fully registered psychologist and you should explain the purpose of your assessment or session. It can be helpful to discuss with your supervisor the best way to introduce yourself to clients and others. It is very rare that a patient will refuse to be seen by you because you identify yourself as a Provisional Psychologist – If this does happen inform your supervisor as soon as possible and don‘t take it personally.
  6. Patient Privacy and Confidentiality
    Discuss with your supervisor how confidentiality of patient information is managed within the agency and adhere to these methods. Examples of ways to maintain patient privacy and confidentiality include:
    * Collect only information relevant to the service being provided. 
    * Never release any information such as reports or test scores to other parties (including clients) without first consulting your supervisor. 
    * Do not discuss information about the client with others including family and friends of the client unless you have the client‘s consent. 
    * If the client is under 18 years of age, ensure you have parental consent to release information.
    * Discuss with your supervisor about policies regarding storage of reports. You are not allowed to take hospital or psychology files off site. You may be allowed to copy material and de-identify it to take it home but you will need to discuss this with your supervisor. 
    * If you are saving patient reports or other information to memory sticks or other computers, de-identify the information and/or password protect documents. In general, you should never email a report to a supervisor without de-identifying information or using a password. Again talk with your supervisor about these issues.
  7. Guidelines re: De-identification
    People can be identified by all sorts of other information, not just their names.  When you de-identify a report, ensure that you change/delete the following:  client name, family members name, doctor/psychiatrist/other workers names, the name of the hospital/other care agencies, their place of residence, where they went to school, where they work, their job if it is unique, the date they were admitted, the date they were assessed (Month is sufficient), their date of birth (year is sufficient).
    Make sure that it is obvious that you have done so by clearly stating at the start that names, dates etc have been changed for privacy purposes.  e.g. "Names and other details have been changed to ensure that privacy is maintained."
  8. Professional Boundaries
    You should maintain professional boundaries with clients at all times. You should not engage in any form of personal relationship with clients or give clients personal information such as your home address or telephone number. Often clients will ask questions about your personal life – they usually have no other motive other than being friendly and polite, however, limit the personal information you disclose about yourself. The parameters of appropriate self-disclosure in the context of therapy can be discussed with your supervisor. Occasionally, you may be given a gift such as chocolates from a client as appreciation of your work. This is normally fine however sometimes patients can give gifts which are excessive (e.g., jewellery) - Use your judgement about whether you should accept the gift and discuss with your supervisor.
  9. Dress on Placement
    What you wear on placement can help to maintain a professional appearance and maintain professional boundaries. The specific style of clothing you wear will vary from placement to placement. It is recommended that you dress more conservatively/formally when you first start placement and then adjust your clothing based on the style that is normal for your supervisor and other staff in a similar role. It is less common these days to wear formal attire such as suits, however, you should avoid casual clothes like jeans, t-shirts, street shoes, sandals, and any revealing clothing. Many organisations require closed-toe shoes and can have rules regarding piercings. You may want to ask your supervisor before you start, about dress expectations.
  10. Signing of Reports and File Notes
    Always write your name and position (i.e., Provisional Psychologist) at the end of your reports and file notes. According to APAC guidelines, your supervisor should counter-sign all your reports and file entries.

Student Concerns

At times, issues or problems can arise on placement. If a student experiences difficulties on placement they should work towards resolving the issue rather than let things continue unaddressed. Most issues can often be resolved by talking with the placement Supervisor, however, if this is unsuccessful or if the student feels unable to do this, then please contact the Placement Coordinator as soon as possible. The process for raising concerns and for resolving placement issues is described in detail under the Special Review Report in the Placement Documentation Section.

Student Files

Throughout the placement, the Placement Coordinator will document all contact with Supervisors, students, or other relevant parties using the appropriate placement documents and/or saving email communication and noting pertinent phone conversations. All reports and placement documents will be placed in a student file, and will be securely stored.

5.5 Policies

Insurance

All enrolled students are members of a personal accident insurance scheme (see http://intranet.monash.edu.au/finance/firm/insurance/studentpersonalaccident/index.html which applies in off-campus situations that include activities authorised by the University). The University has a public and products liability insurance protecting it from claims by third parties for personal injury or damage to property. The policy extends this protection to:

  • Internship and/or practicum undertaken as a course/unit requirement.
  • Placement that is course related and is deemed beneficial to students.
  • Medical and legal clinical placement.
  • Community placement.
  • Enterprise experience and field assignments.
  • Approved voluntary work.

Work placement activities present various risks, for which the following policies have been arranged:

  1. Personal Accident Insurance: For student injury, providing capital, medical and loss of income benefits. Please note that the policy does not pay medicare/private health gap.
  2. Public Liability: For a student’s legal liability to third parties in respect to physical injury and /or property damage caused as a result of their negligence.
  3. Professional Indemnity: For a student’s civil liability committed in their professional duty, but only within the limits of their training.
  4. Medical Malpractice: For students on practical clinical placement where there is a medical malpractice risk exposure. Students must work under supervision of a qualified practitioner/professional.

The insurance cover is only applicable under the following conditions:

  • That all placements are under the supervision of qualified practitioners/professionals.

Students will require proof of insurance prior to placement. This document can be found on InPlace.

Some placement agencies (e.g., hospitals, government agencies) require negotiated Monash-Agency agreements. A number of these are currently held by Monash with outside agencies and will not need to be specifically negotiated for the placement. If a new Monash-Agency agreement needs to be finalised this process may take up to six months or more. The Placement Coordinator can provide further information regarding these requirements if they apply to the student's particular situation. Students employed by the placement agency are not covered by Monash Insurance as they are employees of the organisation.

Motor vehicles

Monash University is not liable for damage to any vehicles while students are on placement. Students use their vehicles at their own risk. It is the responsibility of each student to arrange adequate insurance protection for any damage arising out of the use of his/her vehicle. Students must clarify with the placement agency the conditions governing the use of a private vehicle during placement, in such cases as transporting clients or colleagues.

Dealing with adverse events

From time to time an adverse event may occur that affects a student/intern at a placement setting. Such events include, but are not limited to, violence by patients, acts of self-harm or suicide by patients, the death of a patient, and other distressing events. These guidelines are intended to apply to serious adverse events that have the potential for detrimentally affecting the student/intern. 

While placement sites have their own policies and procedures for dealing with such matters, Monash University has a duty to ensure that the matters are addressed in a way that supports the student/intern and minimises their distress.

These guidelines should be shared with all students/interns and placement/internship Supervisors (“Supervisors”) prior to the commencement of the placement. Acknowledgement that the guidelines have been reviewed by the Supervisor and student/intern will be included in the ‘Placement Health and Safety Checklist’, which forms part of the Placement Contract.

  1. The contact details (including emergency contact details) for the Placement Coordinator and Third Year Coordinator should be provided to all students/interns and Supervisors.
  2. Supervisors should share information about the placement site’s policies and procedures for dealing with adverse events. This is often done as part of an orientation process at the placement site.
  3. As soon as possible following the realisation that an adverse event has occurred, the Supervisor should contact the Placement Coordinator/Third Year Coordinator to explain the circumstances of the event (if the Placement Coordinator is not available, the Supervisor should contact the Course Coordinator)
  4. If the student/intern was not on-site when the event occurred, wherever practicable, it would be preferable for the Supervisor to make contact with the Placement Coordinator/Third Year Coordinator prior to notifying the student/intern.
  5. If the student/intern was on-site when the event occurred, the Supervisor should make contact with the Placement Coordinator/Third Year Coordinator as soon as possible after the event.
  6. The Supervisor should meet with the student/intern to discuss the event and to provide an overview of the procedures to be followed thereafter and the supports that will be made available to the student/intern.
  7. The Placement Coordinator/Third Year Coordinator should inform the Course Coordinator of the occurrence of the adverse event and provide details of the supports that have/will be made available to the student/intern.
  8. The Placement Coordinator/Third Year Coordinator should inform the Head of School and the University Solicitor’s Office about the incident in accordance with insurance reporting requirements.

Irrespective of whether the Placement Coordinator/Third Year Coordinator was present when the student was informed of the event, the Placement Coordinator/Third Year Coordinator (or if necessary, the Course Coordinator) should contact the student/intern as soon as practicable to check on his/her well-being and to provide an overview of the procedures to be followed thereafter and the supports that will be made available to the student/intern.  The supports available to the student include, but are not limited to, the University Health and Wellbeing Counselling Service (phone: 1300 360 364).

Occupational health, safety and environment

Monash University must ensure that students will be operating in a safe work environment during a placement. The University staff and students need to consider risks they are exposed to and the control measures available to minimise those risks. Students should receive information concerning typical hazards and risks that they may encounter in the environment in which they are to work.

Requirements for Placements in Significant Risk Organisations

  • Students should not commence a placement until they have received safety information from the placement organisation. When the activities/tasks to be undertaken are higher risk than those found in organisations where the tasks are predominantly clerical in nature, the following additional requirements apply:
  • The safety information should include both information about typical hazards and risks that they may encounter in the organisation as well as specific safety information for the tasks that they will be undertaking
  • This information could be provided via relevant sections of the organisation’s safety manual.

Health & Safety Briefing

  • The health and safety briefing for placements in significant risk organisations should also cover significant safety issues that are specific to the type of work being undertaken such as, the procedure to be followed if a student encounters violent or aggressive behaviour.
  • All placement students must sign a form to verify that they have read all of the health and safety information provided.

Student Responsibilities

Each student has a moral and legal responsibility for ensuring that his or her work environment is conducive to good OHS by:

  • Reading any notices relating to the student placement, attending any briefing sessions and returning any forms to the placement organiser
  • Taking action to avoid, report, eliminate or minimise hazards of which they are aware
  • Complying with all OHS instructions, policies and procedures
  • Making proper use of all safety devices and personal protective equipment
  • Being familiar with emergency and evacuation procedures
  • Not wilfully or recklessly endangering the health and safety of any person at the workplace or interfere with or misuse anything provided in the interests of environment, health, safety or welfare
  • Adopting safe work and study practices
  • Seeking clarification of supervisory arrangements
  • Seeking the provision of appropriate training where required
  • Reporting all accidents, injuries and near misses to their supervisor and Placement Unit Coordinator

Approval of Placement Sites and Supervisors

The Placement Coordinators shall provide to the Board of Studies a list of proposed placement sites, the names of proposed Placement Supervisors, and relevant documentation for formal review and approval.

Placement Monitoring Process

Suitability of placements is monitored and kept under review and any health, safety or equity concerns should be reported to the Placement Coordinator during the placement.

Throughout the placement, the Placement Coordinator will document all contacts with supervisors, students, or other relevant parties using the appropriate placement documents, by saving email communication and noting relevant phone communication in the students’ files. All reports and materials related to any student’s placement will be placed in the student’s placement file.

Monash University policies are available from the Occupational Health, Safety & Environment web site.

Equity and Diversity

Monash University is committed to promoting equal opportunity in education and employment in recognition of the principles of equity and justice as expressed in the Monash University Global Equal Opportunity Policy. Monash is committed to being fair, equitable and sensitive to the diverse needs of its students and staff in all its policies and practices as well as supporting access by disadvantaged groups.  Equity and diversity issues can be discussed with the Placement Coordinator or a representative from the Monash Equity and Diversity Centre.

Staff and Student Services of Monash University have a Social Justice Unit. The website can be found at: http://monash.edu/social-justice/

Discrimination and harassment grievance procedures can be accessed from http://policy.monash.edu.au/policy-bank/management/student-comm-serv/equity-diversity/discrimination-harrassment-grievance-procedures-australia-only.html

5.6 Unit Requirements & Expectations

5.6.1 Doctor of Psychology in Clinical Psychology and Doctor of Philosophy (Clinical Psychology) Students only

Clinical placements are a vital part of the training of psychologists. Students must successfully complete three supervised placements in a variety of settings within the Doctor of Psychology in Clinical Psychology and Doctor of Philosophy (Clinical Psychology) programs.

Doctor of Psychology in Clinical Psychology students must also complete a fourth placement (internship). This is to be in the student‘s area of specialisation, and occurs in 3rd year. This is not organised by the Placement Coordinator, and therefore is not discussed in this section of the course guide.

In total (not including the internship), students are required to complete a minimum of 1000 hours (134 days) of placement experience during the Doctor of Psychology in Clinical Psychology and Doctor of Philosophy (Clinical Psychology) courses.  Placements have a 7.5 hour working day. Four hundred hours must be direct (face-to-face) contact with a client/patient. If in rural settings, 100 of these hours may be via tele/videolink.  These placement requirements satisfy the APAC (Australian Psychology Accreditation Council) guidelines for Doctoral programs as well as the APS College of Clinical Psychologists’ Course Approval guidelines, and the requirements for registration as a psychologist with the Psychology Board of Australia.

It is essential that the three placements provide students with experience in dealing with a range of client problems (e.g. acute as well as chronic disorders), across varying age ranges (child, adolescent, adult, older adult), settings (e.g. inpatient/outpatient, community), and using of a variety of clinical skills (assessment, treatment, and professional). Each placement should be different in focus so that each of the above dimensions is covered adequately.

All hours are to be recorded in placement diaries with running totals on each page of the diary.

All employment requires completion of some mundane and repetitive tasks (e.g., photocopying, completing forms) and student placements are no exception. The main objective of the placement is to provide an opportunity for students to gain a range of professional clinical psychology skills while contributing to the objectives of the placement agency. Placement tasks may vary from student to student for a variety of reasons. For instance, those students who have had previous work experience, especially in clinical psychology, may be seen by the agency as qualified to engage in high competency tasks, whereas students who have had little or no previous work experience may be only given the opportunity to observe such activities, particularly in their first placement. Thus, the differences within and across agencies, supervisors, and students means that all students will not be performing similar tasks when on placement. Although students will have different levels of expertise depending on their prior experience, professional behaviour is expected to be of the highest standard in all placements regardless of the student’s stage of training.

Students will not be permitted to commence their first placement unless they have satisfactorily completed other course components and progressed adequately on their research. The decision as to whether a student may commence placement training is reached by the relevant Board of Studies.

Introductory Placement - Most students will do their first placement at the Monash Psychology Centre (MPC).This is a 32-day placement and would be completed at a rate of 1-2 days per week depending on the class commitments of the student and the needs of the MPC. A select number of students will do their introductory placement in an external agency. These external introductory placements are primarily observation-based placements with a high level of support and supervision. The initial placement is allocated to the student by the Placement Coordinator. Students who complete an external placement will do their second (intermediate) placement at the MPC.

In the introductory placement, students should already have a sufficient theoretical basis to enable them to acquire placement skills in psychological assessment and interventions with a range of clients. During the introductory placement, proficiency in basic clinical skills should be developed either through direct practice or observation and students should be able to apply their academic training to enable them to select, administer and score the commonly used psychological tests. Students are encouraged to practice writing mental state examinations, case histories and psychological reports. Students would be expected to have frequent opportunities to observe their Supervisor and to be observed by their Supervisor, particularly earlier in the placement. Ethical standards should be strictly adhered to and students should ascertain the specific policies and procedures of the service in regard to ethical considerations (see APS Code of Ethics) as well as occupational health and safety guidelines.

At the completion of the initial placement, students will be expected to understand the role of a psychologist within the placement setting and how this role functions within a multi- disciplinary team. In addition, students will be expected to have developed a thorough understanding of the context of the delivery of the service and the particular function it serves to the clients and the community at large. Students should be cognisant of the competing demands on service delivery and the range of issues that impact upon it.

Intermediate and Advanced Placements - Students will not be permitted to commence their second and third placements until the paperwork from their previous placements has been submitted. Students will be allocated two external placements. These 52-day placements are generally undertaken on a two-day per week basis over 26 weeks, but variations to this standard pattern might be approved. In some instances, part of the placement may be completed in a more intensive manner in the form of a block. In such cases, a student may complete 3 to 5 days per week for a period of weeks. Any adjustments to the usual schedule need to be arranged by the Placement Coordinator prior to commencement of the placement. Considerations include the demands from other components of the course, research progress, and the agency’s capacity to provide adequate placement experience and supervision to the student.

Intermediate Placement - Students are expected to contribute to service delivery by participating in the provision of clinical psychology services to a range of individuals and/or groups with relatively uncomplicated psychological disorders. At this stage, students will be expected to carry a client load with moderate Supervisory support. Management of record keeping and interaction with other professionals should also be carried out with moderate Supervisory support. Again, ethical standards should be strictly adhered to and students should ascertain the specific policies and procedures of the service with regard to ethical considerations as well as occupational health and safety guidelines. Students should also demonstrate an understanding of the complexities of the agency’s role in service delivery. Opportunities for student and Supervisor observation are recommended to facilitate skill development.

At the completion of the intermediate placement, students should have developed skill and confidence in applying their theoretical knowledge, implementing appropriate assessment and intervention techniques, and providing appropriate written and verbal feedback in the form of case notes, reports and letters. Students should also have developed an awareness of the intricacy of the therapeutic relationship and of their contribution to it.

Advanced Placement - The advanced placement provides students with the opportunity to contribute directly to service delivery by participating in the planning and provision of a clinical psychological service to a range of individuals and/or groups with relatively complex emotional and behavioural problems and disorders. At this stage, students will be expected to carry a moderate client load with minimal Supervisory support. Their practice should reflect the professional principles of the highest standard and their role within the agency should be equivalent to that of a junior employee. Opportunities for student and Supervisor observation are recommended particularly with more complex cases or less familiar tasks.

By the end of the advanced placement, students will be expected to independently develop and deliver intervention strategies across a range of areas that reflect an understanding of the current knowledge of best practice. Students should also be proficient and more efficient in conducting assessments, interpreting findings, developing formulations and writing reports and case notes. Furthermore, students should be able to provide input at the organisational level and be able to demonstrate a sound understanding of psychological principles and how these can be implemented within service delivery systems. A full understanding of the complexities of provision of services should be apparent with an appreciation of the wider context in which the client operates and in which the service is provided.

Specialised Clinical Placement (Internship) (Doctor of Psychology in Clinical Psychology students only) - In Year 3, students are required to complete a 68-day internship. Internships are part of the specialisation year and are organised by the specialisation coordinators. They are only available to students who have successfully completed all three placements.

5.6.2 Doctor of Psychology in Clinical Neuropsychology and Doctor of Philosophy (Clinical Neuropsychology) students only

Clinical placements are a vital part of the training of psychologists. Doctor of Psychology in Clinical Neuropsychology students must successfully complete a minimum of 202 days (1515 hours) of practical experience. Doctor of Philosophy (Clinical Neuropsychology) students must successfully complete a minimum of 134 days (1000 hours) of practical experience. Placements have a 7.5 hour working day. Progression through the placement program requires successful completion of placement activities, submission of relevant placement documentation within time limits (see “Placement Documentation” for details), satisfactory completion of coursework components, and adequate progress on research. If these conditions are not met, the Board of Studies may decide to suspend a placement.

Placement activities focus on direct client contact but also include observation of a supervisor and other staff, allied professional activities (e.g. ward rounds, case conferences), supervision sessions and writing reports and case notes. The Advanced Specialised (Internship) placement (completed by Doctor of Psychology in Clinical Neuropsychology) students only) will provide specialised practical training in an applied setting and provide students with opportunities to advance their clinical skills and make and maintain important professional contacts. All employment requires completion of some basic tasks (e.g., photocopying, completing forms) and student placements are no exception. The main objective of the placement is, however, to provide an opportunity for students to gain a range of professional clinical neuropsychology skills while contributing to the objectives of the placement agency. Placement tasks may vary from student to student for a variety of reasons, including the level and type of placement and individual student competencies. Although students will have different levels of expertise depending on their prior experience, professional behaviour is expected to be of the highest standard in all placements regardless of the student’s stage of training. Observing your supervisor and being observed by your supervisor is a vital part of your training at all placement

Introductory Placement - In the introductory placement, students begin the process of applying theoretical knowledge acquired in the first year of coursework to the clinical setting. It is expected that the focus of the introductory placement will be on gaining confidence and competence in core clinical areas such as assessment skills (e.g. Test selection, administration, interpretation), case formulation, and written/oral communication of assessment findings. Students will begin to gain an appreciation of the role of a neuropsychologist in professional practice, how it interacts with other staff in the setting, and the service it provides to the individual and the wider community.

Students will require moderate levels of supervisory input during this placement including opportunities to be observed by their supervisor. A graded introduction to clinical activities is expected. This includes periods of observing a supervisor performing clinical activities, particularly early in the placement. The caseload will depend on the placement setting and the student’s level of competence, however it is common for students on their introductory placement to begin with one neuropsychology assessment per week, and increase this load over the course of the placement.

At the completion of the initial placement, students should be independent in administering common neuropsychological tests and should show independent thought in their selection and interpretation of neuropsychological tests. By the end of this placement, students should generally be able to conduct a neuropsychological assessment without their supervisor present, although supervisor input may still be required for more complex aspects of the assessment such as history taking. Students may still only be observing feedback sessions with clients, or possibly doing joint feedback sessions with supervisors. Interpretations of test scores and case formulations should be assessed with supervisors, and these improved skills in interpretation and formulation should be reflected in the need for fewer revisions in assessment reports relative to earlier in the placement.

Intermediate Placement - In the intermediate placement it is anticipated that students will be consolidating key neuropsychological skills such as test administration, scoring and interpretation, while requiring less support from their supervisor for these activities. Students should be developing competencies in history taking, hypothesis-testing and case formulation. At this stage, students will be expected to carry a client load with moderate supervisory support. Opportunities for student and supervisor observation are recommended to facilitate skill development, although emphasis of direct supervision may shift to observation of more complex aspects of practice (e.g., history-taking, feedback) rather than observation of testing. Students are expected to develop a deeper understanding of the psychologist’s role within the service and to show increased independent thought in supervision sessions.

At the completion of the intermediate placement, students should have developed skill and confidence in applying their theoretical knowledge, implementing appropriate assessment and intervention techniques, and reporting on their findings. Students should be able to independently run a neuropsychological assessment by the end of this placement, although supervisor input may be required with more complex cases particularly during history taking. Students at this stage are more likely to be contributing information in feedback sessions with clients.

Advanced Placement - The advanced placement requires students to further consolidate and hone key neuropsychological competencies with minimal direct supervision. To successfully complete this placement, students will need to independently administer assessment and intervention techniques, provide oral and written reports, and consult with allied professionals across a range of areas that reflect an understanding of the current knowledge of best practice. At this stage, students will be expected to carry a client load with minimal direct supervisory support. Opportunities for student and supervisor observation will continue particularly with more complex cases or less familiar tasks. A full understanding of the complexities of provision of services should be apparent with evidence of appreciation of the wider context in which the client operates and in which the service is provided.

At the end of this placement, students have generally completed the Masters equivalent of placement time and will be expected to have developed sufficient competency in their various clinical and professional skills such that they could operate as a generalist registered psychologist.

Advanced Specialised Placement (Internship) (Doctor of Psychology in Clinical Neuropsychology only) - The final placement will provide advanced and specialised training with the aim of advancing the clinical skills of students beyond the minimum requirements for generalist psychology registration, and to help students make and maintain important professional contacts.  Students will be expected to directly contribute to service delivery by participating in the planning and provision of neuropsychological assessment and treatment to a range of persons with relatively complicated presentations. They will also be expected to carry a client load with minimal supervisory support. Their practice should reflect the professional principles of the highest standard and their role within the agency should be equivalent to that of a junior employee. Students should continue to have some opportunity to observe supervisors for specialised or complex issues (e.g., counselling, running of behaviour management and other interventions, complex capacity assessments).

The location of the specialised placement will be negotiated with individual students, taking into account their preferences and their need for specialised skill acquisition.

As part of the internship placement, students will also attend a series of workshops at Monash focussed on advanced clinical and professional issues using a peer case-discussion format. The workshops will be coordinated by the Placement Coordinator.

5.6.3 Assessment

Students’ performance at each placement is graded pass or fail. The final grade of each placement is made by the Placement Coordinator in consultation with the clinical Supervisor and the Board of Studies.
Satisfactory completion of a placement requires that the student has performed satisfactorily in the placement as reported by the Supervisor and that all documentation in relation to the placement has been signed and submitted to InPlace.

If a student’s performance is determined to be unsatisfactory, a fail grade will be recorded for the placement. Upon failure of a placement, the Board of Studies will consider the appropriate action to be taken. The student is invited to meet with the Placement Coordinator and be involved in the development of a plan to resolve the issues resulting in the placement failure. If a student is not satisfied with the resolution, the student is invited to consult with the Board of Studies. The following recommendations have been devised as possible resolutions to placement failure and do not represent an exhaustive list.

  • The student may be judged to require further training to meet the requirements of placement settings. The Board of Studies will develop a plan to provide the student with additional training and assessment of their progress. An additional placement may be offered to the student upon evaluation of their progress as appropriate for placement. The student’s performance will be assessed during such placement by the processes outlined above. The student’s overall progress in the Clinical Doctoral Course will be modified and extended as appropriate.
  • The student may be judged to not require further training, but requires more clinical experiences to implement progress begun within the failed placement. An additional placement may be offered to the student upon evaluation of their progress as appropriate for placement. The student‘s performance will be assessed during such placement by the processes outlined above. The student’s overall progress in the Clinical Doctoral Course will be modified and extended as appropriate.
  • The student may be judged to be inappropriate for continued training. If so, the Board of Studies will develop a plan for the student’s education based on their progress in the Clinical Doctoral Course.

5.6.3.1 The Ojective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCE)

As part of placement units, students are required to participate in the OSCE as an assessment of clinical competence.  For more information http://www.med.monash.edu.au/psych/students/current/hdr-info-guide/dpsych-osce.html

5.7 Supervisor Information

5.7.1 Welcome

On behalf of the staff and students in the Clinical Doctoral programs at Monash University, we would like to express our sincere gratitude to you for supervising our students. Your involvement as a placement supervisor is vital in giving our students the necessary clinical experiences and skills required for future practice. We hope that your experiences as a supervisor will be positive and of benefit to you and your service.

5.7.2 Supervisor requirements

Placement agencies must have staff who can provide supervision to Clinical Doctoral students.  All supervisors are selected on the basis of their experience in clinical psychology and their skill in training students.  All field supervisors must have full registration with the Psychology Board of Australia (PBA) be a member, or eligible for membership, of the relevant APS College, and have at least two years relevant full time experience.

Ideally, supervisors will be a senior member of staff (P3 or above). Supervisors who do not meet these criteria may still be able to supervisor if a suitable staff member from Monash University is able to co-supervise the placement. As of June 2013, all supervisors must hold supervisor endorsement with the PBA. All supervisors must provide Monash University with their curriculum vitae to keep on file according to APAC guidelines. Supervisors must be able to commit the time and resources necessary for student supervision.

5.7.3 Adjunct academic appointment

As a placement supervisor, we consider you a valued member of our teaching staff and would like invite you to apply for an Adjunct academic appointment within the School of Psychological Sciences at Monash University. The benefits and expectations of having an Adjunct appointment are outlined in Appendix C, together with an application form should you wish to apply. Any queries regarding Adjunct appointments can be directed to the Placement Coordinator.

5.7.4 Professional Development for Supervisors

The Clinical Doctoral programs are committed to supporting the professional development of supervisors. Each year, Monash University will run a supervision Masterclass that is endorsed by the PBA which will help supervisors to maintain and develop their competencies, as well as achieve their PD requirements to remain a Board endorsed supervisor. Supervisors of Monash psychology students can attend the Masterclasses for free. Supervisors will also be invited to more general professional development activities run through the School of Psychological Sciences such as Colloquia meetings.