Projects

Current projects

Our researchers are clinician-scientists. This means they're working on ground-breaking emergency department research while seeing patients in the ER and often teaching medical students too. They're at the top of their game and these are some of the things they're working on right now:

  • Retrospective descriptive study of deliberate self-poisoning presentations to three Emergency Departments in Victoria. Chapman R, Graudins A, Martin C, Rosenstein, M.
    Outcome: The findings of the study may enable clinicians to develop and implement interventions targeted at this group in order to reduce the number of presentations and thereby reducing costs for the health service.
  • Experience ATSI community seeking health care at Dandenong Hospital ED. Chapman R, Smith T.
    Outcome: The outcomes facilitated by this research will contribute to closing the gap in life expectancy for ATSI people and improving their health and wellbeing. Further, it will provide significant insights into the experiences of people identifying as ATSI having implications for not just Dandenong Hospital ED but for all EDs across Monash Health.
  • Implementation and evaluation of cultural competence training Dandenong ED staff. Chapman R, Smith T.
    Outcome: The findings will assist clinicians, educators and hospital management to develop policies, practices and educational programs that ensure Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander patients receive equitable, high-quality, culturally appropriate care when they attend Dandenong Hospital ED.
  • Assessing staff attitude to patients who present with deliberate self-poisoning. Martin C, Graudins A, Chapman R.
    Outcome: Findings from this current study will be used to assess the need for the development and implementation of education strategies for ED health care workers to improve the experience of and provide better support for DSP patients in the ED setting.
  • Oral analgesia for limb pain. Graudins A, Meek R, Edgerton-Warburton D, Meyer A, Parkinson J.
    Outcome: Results will determine whether the addition of opioid analgesia to paracetamol and NSAIDs is necessary for moderate pain in adults with limb injury.
  • PICHFORK study. Graudins A, Seith R, Meek R, Egerton-Warburton D, Furness T, Chapman R.
    Outcome: A positive result in this study may result in considering the addition of ketamine as an alternative analgesic to IN opioids in children with moderate to severe pain in the ED setting.
  • Paediatric Procedural Pain and Distress Survey. Craig S, Roseby R, Barnett M, Chapman R.
    Outcome: To date there is little information about perceptions of procedural pain in a wide group of healthcare professionals from speciality paediatric and non-paediatric settings. This study will address this knowledge gap by a) providing comparative data between a tertiary paediatric hospital and other non-tertiary hospitals, b) emergency departments and ward environments, and c) a tertiary paediatric emergency department, and mixed emergency departments (where both adults and children are treated by the same staff). The survey aims to identify gaps in knowledge, and to assist with the design of targeted educational initiatives aimed at hospital medical and nursing staff.
  • Parent survey - procedural pain and distress. Craig S.
    Outcome: Our study hopes to determine if there are any differences in parental perception of the management of procedural pain and distress between a tertiary paediatric hospital and other non-tertiary hospitals, b) emergency departments and ward environments, and c) a tertiary paediatric emergency department, and mixed emergency departments (where both adults and children are treated by the same staff). The survey aims to identify differences in practice, and to assist with the design of a targeted educational initiative aimed at hospital medical and nursing staff.
  • Off license drug use in paediatrics. Craig S, Graudins A. in collaboration with Austin ED.
    Outcome: Will ascertain the frequency of off licence use of medications in paediatric emergency patients as well as the incidence of adverse reactions to these medicines.
  • Paracetamol audit. Graudins A.
    Outcome: Will determine whether Monash Health doctors at all campuses adhere to current treatment guideline for paracetamol poisoning.
  • An Accelerated Diagnostic Pathway for the assessment of chest pain in the Emergency Department: Clinical outcome and risk stratification. Meek R, Graudins A, Braitberg G, Than M.
    Outcome: Aims to assess whether the accelerated pathway for chest pain management is associated with any unknown adverse event and whether the use of myoglobin with troponin adds any utility to this assessment.
  • Family presence during resuscitation (FPDR): An observational study of emergency personnel working in public hospitals in the state of Victoria during resuscitation events. Cooper S, Taylor B, Porter J, Chapman R.
    Outcome: Observing these events will provide a better understanding of the practice and implementation of family.
  • Emergencies in Radiology - A survey of radiologists and radiology trainees. Craig S, Naidoo P.
    Outcome: To date, there is little information about radiologists' knowledge and skills regarding resuscitation and the management of commonly encountered medical emergencies. The aim of this study is to determine current experience and confidence of Australasian radiologist, to identify knowledge gaps, and to assist in designing a targeted educational program for radiologists and radiology trainees.
  • Learning about error - a survey of junior health professionals. Craig S.
    Outcome: To date, there is little information about junior hospital staff knowledge of open disclosure principles. The survey aims to identify gaps in knowledge, and to assist with the design of a targeted educational initiative aimed at junior staff. In addition, the results may be presented or published at a later date.
  • A retrospective observational study assessing the treatment practice of acute exacerbations of asthma in children with systemic corticosteroids in a paediatric emergency department. Craig S.
    Outcome: The study will help to review our current practice of acute asthma management in emergency department. If our results show that early administration of systemic corticosteroid leads to more rapid recovery and early discharge then we could potentially consider the possibility of change of practice of triage administration of corticosteroids for asthma treatment for better outcome.
  • An audit of paediatric abdominal pain presentations to Monash Health emergency departments. Craig S.
    Outcome: Study results will provide information about current management of paediatric abdominal pain in three metropolitan emergency departments (Monash Medical Centre, Dandenong, and Casey), and has the potential to lead to targeted educational interventions aimed at improving patient care. Results will also provide a baseline with which any intervention - such as a clinical practice guideline - can be compared.
  • The use of Complementary and Alternative Medicines among Paediatric Emergency Department Patients. Craig S, Austin J, Dhir R, Hunter K et al.
    Outcome: Recent Emergency Department (ED) studies in the US have confirmed the high prevalence of use of CAM and have raised concerns about potential drug interactions and toxicity related to CAM use. However, none has documented the prevalence of side effects caused by CAM, nor the actual or potential number of drug interactions related to CAM. Furthermore, a paucity of work has been done looking at CAM use in the Australian ED population. Our knowledge of CAM use within the Australian paediatric population is, therefore, limited. This project aims to: 1. Determine the prevalence of CAM use among paediatric ED Patients. 2. Document the types of CAM taken and the conditions for which they're used. 3. Determine the incidence of side effects due to CAM. 4. Determine population groups (eg. cultural, demographic) more likely to take CAM. 5. Survey the views of the child's carer, particularly their views on CAM safety.
  • Busted! Management of paediatric upper limb fractures - not all that it's cracked up to be! Mills E, Craig S, Oakley E.
    Outcome: Study results will provide information about current management of paediatric upper limb fractures in three metropolitan emergency departments (Monash Medical Centre, Dandenong and Casey), and has the potential to lead to targeted educational interventions aimed at improving patient care. 1st phase of the study has been completed. Data analysis nearing completion for phase 2 of the study.
  • Ultrasound Use in Australasian Emergency Departments: A Survey of ACEM Fellows and Trainees. Craig S, Mellett T, Egerton-Warburton D.
    Outcome: To date, there is little information about the use of emergency department ultrasound (EDUS) by ACEM trainees, how individual emergency physicians use ultrasound, and whether they comply with current ACEM guidelines regarding credentialing. The aim of this study is to describe current practice and provide information about potential barriers to ultrasound use in the Australasian setting. This information will assist us in developing appropriate training and credentialing for ED US.
  • Paediatric abdominal x-rays in the emergency department. Riley J, Ditchfield M, Craig S.
    Outcome: Study results will provide information about current practices in ordering paediatric abdominal plain films in Monash Health Emergency Departments, and has the potential to lead to targeted educational interventions aimed at improving resource allocation and patient care.