Monash Medicine Curriculum Conference 2017

Conference abstracts

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Plenary 1

Title

Improving Monash medical graduates’ preparedness for practice

Speakers

Charlotte Rees, Laura Eades, Lewis Fry, Kate Johnson & Tom Kovitwanichkanont

Abstract

The primary purpose of medical school is to  prepare its graduates for safe and effective clinical practice as PGY1  doctors.  While medical students and  graduates navigate plentiful transitions across their medical education  continuum, increased research over the last ten years has focused on the  important medical student-PGY1 doctor transition and new doctors’ preparedness  for practice (P4P).  While this transition  offers new graduates huge opportunities for intense learning, ultimately  benefiting graduate well-being and patient care, we know that transitions can  be challenging for junior doctors.  Many  of these challenges relate to new doctors feeling unprepared for various  aspects of clinical practice (e.g. safe prescribing, clinical reasoning,  ward-craft etc.), alongside interpersonal (e.g. unsupportive or disrespectful  colleagues) and systemic factors (e.g. understaffing) acting as barriers to  their transition experiences.  In this  keynote, Charlotte will first present a brief overview of the P4P literature in  terms of two research questions: (1) How prepared are medical graduates for  practice? (2) How effective are common P4P transitional interventions? Then,  Charlotte will facilitate a panel discussion with four medical learners at  different stages of training (one Monash year 5 student medical student and three  Monash Medicine Graduates: PGY1-PGY4) to talk about their Monash experience of  P4P. Laura, Lewis, Kate and Tom will answer questions on their understandings  of preparedness, memorable preparedness (and unpreparedness) experiences, their  thoughts on the facilitators and barriers to P4P, alongside their suggestions  on effective P4P educational interventions.   We hope that this interactive plenary will stimulate discussion about  future curriculum enhancement at Monash to improve future medical graduates’  P4P.

Abstract  submission for short papers and posters

Plenary 2

Title

Improving feedback in medical education

Speaker

Elizabeth Molloy

Abstract

Feedback is a challenging but important business in  medical education. Despite compelling evidence that it is important for  learning, feedback is seen as one of the most problematic aspects of the  student experience.  Learners report that  they do not receive enough feedback, and when they do, it is difficult to use.  This finding is consistent across both classroom and workplace settings.  Educators in the classroom struggle with turn-around time for comments on work,  as well as the pressure to provide personalised and individualised comments on  students’ work.  Educators in both  settings also anticipate the emotional impact of their feedback on students,  and can approach these encounters with a tentative (and often back peddling)  stance that reinforces to learners that feedback is a practice to be feared.

This session argues for an alternative way of  looking at feedback practices in medical education. Recent frameworks proposed  by Boud and Molloy (2013) called Feedback Mark 1 and Mark 2 will be explored.  Here, feedback is re-conceptualised as an activity driven by learners, rather  than an act of ‘telling’ imposed on learners. Learners are encouraged to  self-evaluate, and to help devise plans that will help them achieve the set  learning goals. This approach challenges learning cultures with established  feedback rituals resembling experts telling learners what is going right and  what is going wrong, with very little planning for what comes next (Feedback  Mark 0). Principles for how to enact Feedback Mark 1 and 2 in pre-clinical and  clinical curricula will be discussed, along with the results of recent  innovations that have attempted to do so. These innovations include design of  assessment where there are nested tasks to allow for clear transference of  feedback into subsequent work, use of technology to promote peer engagement in  feedback, tools to hone educators’ reflections about their own feedback  practice, and explicit training for students, early in their courses, on how to  use feedback for learning.

Abstract  submission for short papers and posters

Parallel Session 2: Workshop I

Title

Transition to an MD Degree – Assessment Challenges

Presenters

Megan Wallace, Julia Harrison, Michelle Leech & Geoff Solarsh

Abstract

Monash University’s  first cohort in its new MD program was enrolled in 2017 and will reach the  final year of the MED course (Year 5D) in 2020. Summative assessment in this  final year of an Extended Master’s degree needs to generate sufficient  assessment workload points at an AQF 9 standard to meet the 48 credit point  requirements for a full year of study. Twenty-four credit points have  provisionally been allocated to four existing core rotations in Medicine, Surgery, Acute Care and Chronic/Aged Care (6 credit points  each) and the remaining 24 credit points to two new units, viz. ‘Scholarly  Intensive’ and ‘Patient Safety and Preparedness for Practice’ (12  credit points each).

In this session we wish to cover some of the assessment challenges  associated with this restructure. Following a short overview of the proposed  changes that will accompany the introduction of an MD degree, we will run two  mini-workshops serially covering assessment issues for: a) The Scholarly  Intensive and b) The core rotations in Medicine, Surgery, Acute Care and  Chronic Care.

The main challenge for the Scholarly Intensive is the development of an  assessment strategy that provides meaningful assessment of short-term scholarly  activity, is equally applicable across a wide range of research and professional  practice projects, and does not make unsustainable demands on project  supervisors.

The main challenge for the Year 5D core rotations is supplementing the  existing Pre-Intern Assessment (PIA) at the end of each rotation with more  robust instruments to measure performance-based clinical competence of our  students without overwhelming the capacity of busy clinical teams to complete  these assessments.

Abstract  submission for short papers and posters

Parallel Session  3: Workshop II

Title

Losing the ‘A’:  What is the impact of bringing ‘tech’ into ‘teach’?

Presenters

Jennifer Lindley  & Michelle Lazarus

Abstract

The  use of technology and e-learning has increased dramatically in healthcare  education.  Monash, due to a variety of  factors, is also increasing use of technology in the classroom; this is  reflected in teaching spaces and the suite of e-learning tools now available to  educators.  The transition from didactic  teaching to student-centered educational approaches is highlighted by the Better Teaching Better Learning agenda.  This shift can create a number of challenges for stakeholders in the field of  teaching and learning.  The purpose of  this workshop is to highlight some current educational technologies available  at Monash and to explore some of the key issues, challenges, and benefits of  stakeholders engaged in using technology in the classroom through roundtable  discussions.   The purpose of this  roundtable discussion will be to ask: What is the role of technology in  teaching and learning? How does the use of technology impact upon the learner,  the educator and the student-teacher interaction? How can we harness technology  effectively for teaching and learning?

Abstract  submission for short papers and posters

Parallel Session 5: Workshop III

Title

“Developing a curriculum to promote collaborative care”

Presenters

Fiona  Kent, Arunaz Kumar & Kerry Hood

Abstract

Collaborative,  rather than profession specific practice is required to deliver safe, efficient  and integrated healthcare. Our health systems, while attempting to deliver  patient-centred care are becoming increasingly complex. It is important that  graduates recognise and acquire the skills for confident collaboration with  both their professional colleagues and patients.  The new Collaborative Care Curriculum at  Monash University details the learning targets for collaborative practice for  medicine, nursing, pharmacy and allied health students. Curriculum development  has been informed by academics, students, accreditation requirements and  experienced patient advocates. We will present a brief overview of the process  of development and final framework of the Collaborative Care Curriculum and  introduce the formal and informal approaches to learning currently in place and  under development. We will workshop some of the education activities currently  in place: a medical and midwifery student skills workshop, a combined medical  and nursing student placement in the emergency department and some of the  informal learning activities under investigation, followed by a facilitated  debrief. Finally, the importance of the facilitator in promoting learning  opportunities across the professions will be discussed.

Abstract  submission for short papers and posters

Parallel Session 6: Workshop IV

Title

Enhancing student involvement in medical  curriculum design and research: techniques and challenges

Facilitators

Kevin Shi, Dinesh Giritharan, Patrick Tang  & Jennifer Wang

Abstract

Medical students are a major stakeholder in the content and delivery of medical school curricula but have traditionally not been involved in their planning and design. This session, presented by current senior student representatives of the Monash MBBS cohort, will demonstrate how student input can be used to supplement the expertise of educators to improve the appeal and relevance of learning activities.

Both formal and informal methods for collecting student input will be discussed, with particular reference to recent changes to the Monash MBBS program. We will also review the most significant concerns received from students across the medical course as well as the common difficulties faced by educators seeking feedback, such as sampling bias, poor survey response (survey fatigue) and unrealistic student expectations.

Many Monash students are also involved in formal and informal peer teaching, such as the VESPA program, and this is a valuable supplement to students’ formal education. However, student collaboration may also inadvertently obstruct curriculum changes or decrease assessment reliability, and strong communication is essential in helping students teach in parallel to the medical course.

The evolving role of students in medical education research, both as participants and investigators, will be considered briefly, with an aim to encourage translation of ongoing curriculum review into high quality data for analysis.

Student representatives will then facilitate a small group discussion and provide a student perspective to any academic staff seeking feedback on current or planned future curriculum components.  We hope this session provides an opportunity to develop strong partnerships between students and educators to help maximise the learning and teaching experience.

Abstract  submission for short papers and posters