Monash Medicine Curriculum Conference 2018

Conference abstracts

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Plenary 1

Title

Workplace-based assessment – where’s the value?

Speakers

Professor Dragan Ilic, Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Monash University

Abstract

A key aspect that any health trainee values is the opportunity to assess their knowledge and skills in an authentic workplace environment. Assessment from a clinical member of the teaching staff provides the trainee with an opportunity to assess competency in those skills, their alignment with learning outcomes and the degree of work readiness. The use of mini-CEX, multisource feedback, direct observation of procedural skills and patient encounters (formal and informal) are all examples of workplace-based assessments commonly used across medical and health professions degrees. This presentation will focus on exploring the value of such workplace-based assessments. What is the benefit of using such assessments in a formative versus summative format? Can student performance be predicted in such assessments? What is the cost associated with running workplace-based assessment – do they offer value for money?

Plenary 2

Title

Interprofessional assessment: enhancing learning for collaboration

Speaker

Professor Jill Thistlethwaite, University of Technology, Sydney

Abstract

This presentation will draw on the recently published international consensus on the assessment of interprofessional learning outcomes, acknowledging current trends in health professional assessment. I will explore the similarities and differences between the assessment of uniprofessional practice and interprofessional collaborative practice (ICP) and the challenges we face in defining and educating for ICP at different levels of training. There are major changes expected in relation to accreditation of health professional programs in Australia with a greater emphasis on IPE. What may we learn from colleagues nationally and globally to ensure that these changes enhance interprofessional learning and provide the stimulus to consider collaborative assessment?  But I also want to stress that developing an interprofessional identity and becoming interprofessional are great ways to ensure the delivery of optimal healthcare. I believe that collaboration is beneficial for learners, health professionals and patients – we should not be alone, even during assessment.

Parallel 1: Evaluation Research I

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Parallel 2: Workshop I

Title

"All sites are equal, but some are more equal than others" - with apologies to Orwell

Facilitators

Chris WrightGeoff Solarsh

Abstract

In a program as diverse as the Monash Medical program, educational equivalence is a key issue. Our programs are delivered in a number of diverse community contexts, from large metropolitan teaching hospitals to remote general practices. Stakeholders ranging from the  students themselves, to the Australian Medical Council, to the general public all wish to see equivalent outcomes no matter where particular graduates train.  This session seeks to explore these issues in the context of the Monash Year 3B program. This program is delivered across 17 health services and two countries. Discussion will focus around: (1) what is educational equivalence? (2) how do we measure it? (3) what governance structures and processes support it? and (4) what are the challenges we face in delivering educational equivalence?

Parallel 3: Workshop II

Title

Educational technology in the Monash Medical course – enabling or enslaving?

Facilitators

Michelle Leech, George Kotsanas & Pedram Rajabifard

Abstract

The MED course at Monash University is delivered in multiple widely distributed campuses, clinical schools and affiliated sites. Simple technology is required to provide access to idealised materials for all sites. The utility and flexibility of this platform is critical to the end user experience. The Faculty of Medicine, Nursing & Health Sciences has in recent years invested in the development of a curriculum database. The functionality of this database will be presented as part of this session. Educational technology aimed at the transformation of learning and teaching has also been utilised in the Monash Medicine course in recent years including the anonymous peer learning platform VERSO® and the longitudinal personal learning platform Pebblepad®. Across many disciplines and in the clinical and pre-clinical years there is widespread use of Kahoot®. The experience with each of these platforms, their integration, and intersection with the increasingly active learning in the pre-clinical years will be outlined. Finally, the technologies which appeal to educators have often been discarded or transcended by the students they are teaching. Over many years, Monash medical students have developed impressive technological solutions to assist their own learning. Monash final year students will highlight some of these end user developed learning supports which may reflect (with more veracity) the preferred learning technologies of current and future generations. As with learning in medicine, educational technology should be fit for purpose, address a defined unmet need, and enable rather than enslave learners and educators.

Parallel 4: Workshop III

Title

The ‘coming out’ of mental health in medicine – can we move beyond the blame game?

Facilitators

Lyn Clearihan, Geoff Thompson & Jennifer Wang

Abstract

There is an evolving proactive approach to medical students’ mental health at Monash University, both among the student body and from the Faculty. However, in spite of this, mental health creates a cloak of fear among medical student across all year levels about disclosure. The feeling that there will be intolerance among peers, colleagues and Faculty and a negative impact on student careers continues to overshadow students’ perceptions of the consequences of disclosure of mental health issues. Growing recognition of the prevalence of the problem is mirrored in the growth of a ‘blame culture’ that sometimes splits along generational, institutional or professional fault lines. In exploring these issues, this interactive workshop will revisit the prevalence of the problem, students’ perceptions of mental health and the approaches currently being explored within the Monash Faculty environment. The workshop will include some brief presentations about the key issues, alongside group activity and discussion. We hope the workshop will encourage a novel approach to the solutions by questioning what we mean by mental health and whether it is synonymous with the life of a doctor. The workshop welcomes clinical, academic and professional staff and medical students.

Parallel 5: Workshop IV

Title

Developing and implementing an Indigenous health curriculum

Facilitators

Karen Adams & Cicily Nesbit

Abstract

The aim of this workshop is to strengthen educator skills in teaching Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health curricula. You will leave the workshop having developed a teaching tool relevant to this area. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people face substantial healthcare access issues. As educators, we are in the privileged position to create change to this inequity by growing graduates who are equipped to understand the evidence behind what works to provide better access.  This workshop will showcase what is working well in embedding the Indigenous health curriculum in medicine, what evidence exists about preparing health professionals for this area, the imperative for assessment and how you can make a difference. It will be led by Indigenous and non-Indigenous facilitators with a passion for empowering students in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health. There can be a perception that teaching Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander content is depressing, difficult or boring. We will debunk these myths and stereotypes and convert you to enthusiasm and hopefulness that positive changes can be made in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health. That's right; learning about racism and privilege can be engaging and fun!

Parallel 6: Evaluation Research II:

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Parallel 7: Workshop V

Title

Medical students as partners in curriculum planning: fresh perspectives and ideas for the future

Facilitators

Jennifer Wang, Pedram RajabifardAidan Kashyap & Pravik Solanki

Abstract

Our 2018 workshop, presented by current student representatives of the Monash MBBS (Hons) cohort, aims to shed light on hot topics in the student sphere: research, assessments and the role of social media in medical education. With the transition of Monash Medicine to an MD program, designing a research-oriented curriculum is more relevant than ever. We will explore potential Scholarly Intensive Projects (SIPs) and potential ways we can enrich the research aspect of our medical school, focusing on the BMedSci and PhD programs. The ways in which students are assessed in academia and professionalism is constantly evolving. However, feedback and suggestions from students do not always reach the faculty. We will share students’ thoughts on our current assessment schedule, with a focus on ways of fine-tuning the program to further ensure Monash students graduate as safe and effective health practitioners. Social media platforms such as Facebook, YouTube, Wiki and podcasts have transformed the way students communicate, interact and learn. We will discuss how the current key social media players in our medical school have benefited students, highlight the limitations, and explore how we can harness social media for effective medical education. This interactive workshop will consist of presentations as well as open discussion with faculty members in attendance. We hope this session continues to strengthen the partnership between students and educators to enrich the unique learning and teaching experience Monash offers.

Parallel 8: Workshop VI

Title

Teaching clinical reasoning at Monash Medical School: from good to great - how can we get there?

Facilitators

Julia Harrison

Abstract

The Medicine Theme IV (clinical skills) Committee are in the process of reviewing how we foster the development of clinical reasoning skills in the Medicine program. We have an overview of how it is taught and assessed and have identified strengths and weaknesses. We would like input from a broader range of our staff and students before we make recommendations. This workshop provides an opportunity to contribute to this ongoing work.  Specific areas of potential focus are: (1) Integration of basic sciences with conditions and patient assessment (history, examination and clinical reasoning); (2) Transitioning students from performing systems-oriented patient assessments to problem-oriented patient assessments; and (3) Ensuring students build on their history, examination and clinical reasoning skills in final year. At our final year assessment workshop, held during last year’s Monash Medicine Curriculum Conference, there was strong support for an observed clinical exam at the end of the course. Do we have a case for this? If so, how could we do it? In addition, participation in this workshop will stretch your thinking about how best to teach and learn clinical reasoning. Hopefully you will be motivated to focus more on this aspect of your teaching/learning and inspired to try new strategies. The workshop will be interactive, collaborative, and will involve small groups working on challenging questions. Staff and students from all stages of the course are most welcome.

Parallel 9: Workshop VII

Title

Patients at the centre of the curriculum: Requirements of patient-centred systems (ROPCCS) training workshop for health professionals and educators

Facilitators

Kathryn Ogden, Jennifer Barr & Jenepher Martin

Abstract

This workshop aims to provide medical educators with greater understanding of what is required for genuine partnership between medical students and patients and patient-centred care to be achieved, and to develop strategies they can utilise in their role towards this universal goal. Specific objectives are to understand the cross-sectoral responsibility and operational requirements for patient-centred care, develop an appreciation of the patient’s perspective relating to requirements for patient-centred care and increase self-awareness of own patient-centred practice.  Participants will plan actionable activities and strategies to promote patient-centred care and develop patient-centred capability. The facilitators of this workshop have worked in medical education for over 10 years, with a specific focus on developing patient-centred care capability in medical students. In 2015 Jenny Barr and Kath Ogden conducted a participatory concept mapping research project which resulted in the construction of a Requirements of Patient-Centred Care Systems (ROPCCS) Conceptual Map (Ogden, Barr, & Greenfield, 2017), composed of 123 items which are sorted into 13 clusters of differing constructs. The conceptual map also incorporates ratings for each item and cluster regarding their relative importance, feasibility and how well they are achieved. This research is now being translated into practice through a variety of measures, including a Requirements of Patient Centred Care Systems Training Workshop for health professionals. The workshop will introduce medical educators and other participants to the ROPCCS Conceptual Map, and to workshop these requirements with peers and patients/carers to consider implications for curriculum development.

Parallel 10: Workshop VIII

Title

Implementation of faculty evaluation strategy: Impacts and outcomes of Monash University health courses using contribution analysis

Facilitators

Claire Palermo, Wee-Ming Lau, Jennifer Lindley, Arunaz Kumar & Anne Powell

Abstract

A variety of evaluation approaches are utilised for Monash University medicine, nursing and health sciences courses. Current evaluation approaches may not use a strategic approach to provide evidence that our curricula have developed the attitudes and behaviours needed for safe and effective healthcare delivery. This workshop will showcase a faculty-wide framework that aims to shift our evaluation focus to measuring whether curricula have developed the knowledge, skills, attitudes, behaviours and practice required. It will explore how contribution analysis will be used for the evaluation of the faculty health sciences and FFhealth professions programs. Workshop participants will discuss strengths and weaknesses of current evaluation methods in medicine, explore how they may be used for building the case for evaluation of the Monash medical program and link this to theoretical evaluation approaches.