Our alumni


Biographies

Dr Chris Capel

Title of your thesis & Completion year

Power, police and remote citizen activism: a case study of the Lake Eyre Basin Wild Rivers policy. 2014

PhD abstract

This PhD research examines what influence women and men in Central Western Queensland (CWQ) have on natural resource management policy that significantly impacts on their lives and livelihoods. It uses the Lake Eyre Basin Wild Rivers (LEB WR) policy development and deliberations as a case study focusing in particular on the period from 2009–2011. Sociological research in remote Australia is rare, especially research conducted by a long-term community based insider researcher. Some organisations and individuals expend a substantial amount of time and money to influence government policy from remote areas, with varied success. This case study provides evidence of policy being shaped by remote citizens despite widely disparate views being held by participants and a perception that Wild Rivers policy was imposed on them. The topic is explored using a critical theory approach drawing on Lukes structural theories of power. Gender and intersectionality are also used to frame the research as are the concepts of Deliberative Democracy and Ecological Sustainable Development (ESD). Geographic remoteness, gender and indigeneity are specifically examined as potential sites of marginalisation. Methods included the use of semi-structured interviews with activists and a media content analysis.

Link to the thesis in the Monash PhD Repository

http://arrow.monash.edu.au/hdl/1959.1/1207923

Summary of your background

Chris lived on her family’s sheep and cattle grazing property in Central Western Queensland for 30 years and continues to be involved in the farm business at a distance due to their recent move to the Mid North Coast NSW. She worked for the Department of Primary Industries and the Office of Rural Communities in Queensland in project officer/policy advice/management roles as a home based teleworker from 1997 - 2008. She was actively involved in voluntary work for state and national rural women’s and other organisations. This included leading activism on rural teleworking – a concept she pioneered with state government in the 1990s. She is a graduate of the Australian Rural Leadership Program 2001. She is currently on two advisory boards – Regional Development Australia Mid North Coast (NSW) and the North Queensland Rural Financial Counselling Service. Her consultancy business – Chris Capel Consulting- works with a range of clients including the Farming Together funding program, the Mithaka Aboriginal Corporation, the Barcoo Shire Council and the Remote Area Planning and Development Board.


Dr Josephine Clarke

Contact

Phone: 990 31043

Title of your thesis & Completion year

A gender analysis of agricultural and rural restructuring in the Mallee region (2015)

PhD abstract

This PhD thesis outlines a gendered analysis of agricultural and rural restructuring in the Mallee region of north-west Victoria. In contrast to the usual focus on ‘structural adjustment’, it seeks to understand gendered social relationships in a changing agricultural industry context, and a political and economic context framed by climate challenges. The research is conducted with women and men – including couples – who are farming and / or who have left farming. Participants articulate gendered relationships and subjectivities, and comment on gendered social relationships in the context of multiple pressures including climatic changes, drought and declining terms of trade. The findings of this research highlight the multiple exits that are occurring in agricultural and rural restructuring and the numerous, often disparate, ways women and men leave farming. The experiences of restructuring and leaving farming are diverse and gendered. This research suggests that agriculture in the Mallee region is becoming further masculinised as a result of the differing ways participants are exiting farming. Further, as gender relations are renegotiated during this time of extraordinary changes, these in turn challenge discourses of family farming. Finally, in the local-global nexus of gender relations, many participants offer insights into managing the stresses and challenges of ongoing agricultural restructuring.

Link to the thesis in the Monash PhD Repository

https://figshare.com/articles/A_gender_analysis_of_agricultural_and_rural_restructuring_in_the_Mallee_region/4697497

Summary of your background

Dr Josephine Clarke completed her PhD 'A gender analysis of agricultural and rural restructuring in the Mallee region' in 2015. After completing her PhD Dr Clarke worked as a Postdoctoral Research Fellow in the GLASS Research Unit on the ARC Linkage Project 'Social sustainability in dairying communities impacted by the Murray-Darling Basin Plan'. Her research interests include gender analysis, rural and remote restructuring and livelihoods, rural health and wellbeing, gender and climate change, and public policy analysis. Prior to commencing her doctoral studies she worked as a researcher for a Victorian women's health organization. Dr Clarke also worked for a number of years in community development and human services in Alice Springs and Central Australia. Dr Clarke is now an Adjunct Research Fellow with the GLASS Research Unit.

Link to Monash research website and list of publications

http://monash.edu/research/explore/en/persons/josephine-clarke(726cc28f-2dd6-4267-9bf8-209f295e73bb).html


Dr Veronica Coady

Title of your thesis & Completion year

Defining resilience in the face of uncertainty: an explication of hope and coping with Parkinson’s disease in rural Australia. Completed 2016

PhD abstract

Parkinson’s disease (PD) is synonymous with uncertainty; people experience the trajectory and symptomology differently. The thesis explored how people living with PD in rural and regional Australia were engaging in hopeful coping strategies which lent themselves to the process of resilience. The literature points to a gendered difference in coping, along with intersectional effects associated with age, place and illness. Yet few researchers have explored how and why these social determinants might be moderating the process of resilience for people with PD. The mixed method approach to the data collection and analysis was based on feminist- pragmatic epistemology. Results revealed that people were actively engaging in creative and flexible strategies which are explored and situated in the contexts of gender, power and place. This approach to knowledge enabled a working definition of resilience to emerge which contributed to and expanded on current knowledge through the discovery of an inclusive definition of resilience for the participants. It also provided a working definition that highlighted novel ways of coping with and persevering with PD which might be explored further.

Link to the thesis in the Monash PhD Repository

https://figshare.com/articles/Defining_resilience_in_the_face_of_uncertainty_an_explication_of_hope_and_coping_
with_Parkinson_s_disease_in_rural_Australia/4719838

Defining resilience in the face of uncertainty: an explication of hope and coping with Parkinson’s disease in rural Australia.

Parkinson’s disease (PD) is synonymous with uncertainty; people experience the trajectory and symptomology differently. The thesis explored how people living with PD in rural and regional Australia were engaging in hopeful coping strategies which lent themselves to the process of…..

Summary of your background

Veronica is currently working as a research assistant within the Department of rural health, Melbourne University. Prior to completing her PhD, Veronica gained her Postgraduate Diploma in Psychology at Monash and her Bachelor of Arts (Psychology, Sociology) at the University of Sydney. Her research interests include chronic illness, rurality, gender, and resilience.


Dr Naomi Joy Godden

Contact

Email: naomi.godden@monash.edu
Phone: 0407776815

Title of your thesis & Completion year

The love ethic in international rural community work (2015)

PhD abstract

Influential 20th Century activists such as Mahatma Gandhi, Martin Luther King Jr. and Thich Nhat Hanh were motivated by love, a key feature of the human condition (Maturana & Verden-Zoller 2008). However, the social work profession generally avoids love as an ethic of practice (Banks 2006; Butot 2004; Morley & Ife 2002). Yet feminist bell hooks (2000) claims love can transform dominant structures of inequality, such as capitalism, patriarchy, racism and environmental exploitation. Drawing from Peck (1978), hooks describes love as ‘[t]he will to extend one’s self for the purpose of nurturing one’s own or another’s spiritual growth’ (2000, p. 4). Ingredients of love are care, affection, recognition, respect, commitment and trust, with honest and open communication, forgiveness and giving. This Thesis including Published Works considers the love ethic in international rural community work. It includes six sole-authored journal articles with an exegesis to analyse my research regarding love in community work and contribute an alternative paradigm to social work and community work theory and practice.The research questions are: What is love in international rural community work? and, How can love transform structural inequality? My methodology was informed by change-oriented research, a four-part epistemology of change I developed that involves shared power (McCall 2005; Mikkelsen 2005), participation (Arnstein 1969; Davidson 1998; Heron 1996; Pretty et al. 1995), action (Greenwood & Levin 2007; Stringer 2007) and contextual reflexivity (Delva, Allen-Meares & Momper 2010; Denzin & Giardina 2009; Saukko 2003). Change-oriented research is a collaborative process to understand and transform social injustices through cycles of action and reflection, generating multiple and contextualised knowledges that empower participants to collectively take action for sustainable change. Through the co-operative inquiry method (Heron 1996), I worked with community workers, volunteers, activists and community members as co-inquirers (also referred to as co-researchers) in three case studies in Timor-Leste, Australia and Peru to collaboratively develop knowledge regarding love-based community work. Each co-operative inquiry used creative methods such as visual art, theatre, dialogue and storytelling (Bessarab & Ng'andu 2010; Holt 2013; Knowles & Cole 2008; Leavy 2008; Markula 2006; Pauwels 2011). I combined the inquiry outcomes into a theory of practice entitled The Love Ethic for Transformational Change. The Love Ethic is grounded in hooks’ love-centred radical feminism, dialogue (Freire 1989; Westoby & Dowling 2013), nonviolence (Gandhi 2005; Hanh 1993; King Jr. 1967a; Kelly & Sewell 1988) and the interconnectedness of people and nature. The Love Ethic has four features: *It is based on values and universal rights of humans and nature; *It promotes participatory, democratic and gender transformative community work processes that intertwine people and nature and actively challenge structures of power and inequality; *It aims for structural change for universal wellbeing of people and nature; and, *Love-based action is reciprocal and cyclical. The Love Ethic supports social movements to collectively critique and transform inequitable systems. This research is a radical contribution to social work theory and practice. I argue love is an ethical philosophy of action for progressive people’s movements to bring about a new world order of equality and sustainability.

Link to the thesis in the Monash PhD Repository

http://figshare.com/articles/The_love_ethic_in_international_rural_community_work/4705117

Summary of your background

Dr. Naomi Joy Godden is a community worker, activist for social justice and environmental integrity, and feminist participatory researcher from the rural community of Margaret River, Western Australia. For more than 15 years her work has bridged feminism, activism, research and policy in Australia and internationally in areas such as gender justice, Aboriginal family violence prevention, youth participation, education access, poverty alleviation, homelessness and affordable housing, sexual exploitation of women, environmental conservation and the gendered impacts of climate change. Naomi has worked in urban, rural and remote communities in Australia, Peru, United States, Honduras, Solomon Islands, Timor-Leste, Papua New Guinea and India, and has participated in numerous United Nations processes for women’s rights and climate action.
In 2015, Naomi completed her PhD at the Gender, Leadership and Social Sustainability Research Unit (GLASS) at Monash University. Her research was entitled ‘The love ethic in international rural community work’, and involved feminist participatory action research with community workers in Australia, Timor-Leste and Peru to develop a radical, non-violent framework of community work and activism for structural change.

Naomi is a Research Fellow at GLASS, researching feminist climate justice activism for transformational change. She is also involved in numerous social justice and environmental justice activist collectives at local, national and international levels. She is a founder and Chair of Just Home (housing justice organisation, Margaret River) and the Women’s Climate Justice Collective (Australia).

Publications

Refereed journal articles

Godden, N 2017, ‘Community work research through co-operative inquiry in Timor-Leste, Australia and Peru: Insights into process’, Systemic Practice and Action Research, advanced online version. doi: 10.1007/s11213-017-9420-0
Godden, N 2017, ‘The love ethic: a radical theory for social work practice’, Australian Social Work, advanced online version. Doi: 10.1080/0312407X.2017.1301506
Godden, N 2017, ‘A co-operative inquiry about love using narrative, performative and visual methods’, Qualitative Research, vol. 17, no. 1, pp. 75-94.
Godden, N 2017, ‘The participation imperative in co-operative inquiry: personal reflections of an initiating researcher’, Systemic Practice and Action Research, vol. 30, no. 1, pp. 1-18.
Godden, N 2016, ‘Love in community work in rural Timor-Leste: a co-operative inquiry for a participatory framework of practice’, Community Development Journal. Advanced online version. doi: 10.1093/cdj/bsw022
Godden, N 2013, ‘Gender and declining fisheries in Peru: Beyond pescador and ama de casa’ in M. Alston & K. Whittenbury (Eds.), Research, Action and Policy: Addressing the Gendered Impacts of Climate Change, Springer, Melbourne, pp.251-263. 
Gartrell, A, Jennaway, MG, Manderson, L & Godden, N 2016, ‘Making the invisible visible: disability inclusive development in Solomon Islands’, The Journal of Development Studies, vol. 52, no. 10, pp. 1389-1400. 
Alston, M, Whittenbury, K, Haynes, A & Godden, N 2014, ‘Are climate challenges reinforcing child and forced marriage and dowry as adaptation strategies in the context of Bangladesh?’, Women's Studies International Forum, vol. 47, pp. 137-144. 
Godden, N & Muli, C 2013, ‘Peer review: an emerging research method in international development’, Development Bulletin, no. 75, pp. 92-97. 
Godden, N 2008, ‘Missing the Education Revolution’, Campus Review, Vol. 18, No.18, p. 11.

Opinion pieces

Godden, N 2016, ‘Our future: equality struggle must extend to climate issues’, The Courier, 12 September 2016. 
Godden, N 2008, ‘Education in rural Australia’, On Line Opinion (online), 27 May 2008. http://www.onlineopinion.com.au/view.asp?article=7376
Godden, N 2008, ‘Why did rural human rights fail to scale summit?’, The Age, 23 April, p. 7. 
Godden, N 2005, ‘Students in poverty: Centrelink and regional students’, Pelican, Vol. 76, no. 1, pp. 14-15. 
Godden, N 2005, ‘Youth Allowance and regional young people’, Youth Affairs Council of Western Australia Interface, December, pp. 12-13.