Our students


Biographies

Sharon Alexander

Contact

Email: Sharon.Alexander@monash.edu

Thesis title

Power, Knowledge, & Subjectivity: The Politics of the Perinatal Self

Supervisors

Uschi Bay, Rosemary Sheehan, Jane Maidment

What is your research about?

This research is about the politics of perinatal mental health and its relation to women’s maternal subjectivity within the perinatal period. Today within Australia women’s perinatal mental health is a significant public health concern. During the perinatal period maternal women are routinely called on to engage in practices to monitor, change, and take care of themselves relating to their mental health and wellbeing in particular ways. This research explores several types of documents including policy, risk assessment tools and women’s own accounts of working on transforming themselves. This research elaborates on the ways Michel Foucault’s theorising can expand on current conceptualisations of perinatal mental health, processes of maternal subjectivity and the implications for social work practice arguing these are political matters as much as they are health matters.

Summary of your background

I have been working with people in both government and community settings for the last 18 years. I have practice experience in youth justice, housing, family violence and public health promotion and for the last 8 years I have been working as a general counsellor at a community health centre. My honours research focused on the experiences of women attending a postnatal depression group.

Which GLASS Strategic Research Area their work fits into

Gender, intersectionality, and culture


Barbara Marilyn Baikie

Contact

Email: Barbara.baikie@monash.edu

Thesis title

The Long-Term Impact of Institutional Child Sexual Abuse

Supervisors

Chris Trotter, Margaret Alston, Urshi

What is your research about?

My research examines the long term impact of sexual abuse of the men and women whose cases have been subject to examination by The Royal Commission into institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse and what factors exacerbate or ameliorate this impact?

Summary of your background

Barbara has over 20 years’ experience in public service, including child protection, juvenile justice, and disabilities. She lectured at Charles Sturt University for six years. Barbara is a Principal Consultant at Wick Consulting.

List of recent (last 5 years) and most prominent publications and media pieces

Presentation to the ANZATSA 7th Biennial International Research, theory and practice conference November 2015

Which GLASS Strategic Research Area their work fits into

This is difficult as my research does not fit comfortably into one box, it crosses many areas – such as

  • Gender, intersectionality, and culture
  • Leadership, participation, and livelihoods
  • Violence against women and girls

Naela Chohan

Contact

Email: Graduate-education@monash.edu

Phone: +61 3 9905 3009

Title of your thesis

Links between culture and sustainable development: Policy formulation challenges for empowering women through water management.

Supervisors

Dr. Margaret Alston and Dr. Kerry Whittenbury

Certificates/Postgraduates/Degrees etc achieved:

M.Sc. International Relations

What your research is about:

It is about policy formulation challenges for water management through empowering women in the backdrop of culture and its impact on achievement of Sustainable Development Goals.

Which GLASS Strategic Research Area their work fits into

  • Gender, intersectionality, and culture

Laura Coady

Contact

Email: Laura.Coady@monash.edu

Thesis title

Invisible Farmer: An analysis of the contemporary position of rural women in Australia

Supervisors

Main supervisor: Prof Margaret Alston AM 
Associate supervisor: Dr Kerri Whittenbury

Certificates/Postgraduates/Degrees etc achieved

BA Arts in Communication (Social Inquiry), UTS
BA (Hons) Gender Studies, USyd

What is your research about?

Part of the larger Invisible Farmer project, this research will investigate the contemporary position(s) of rural women in Australia, with a focus on women's contributions to farming and how life in rural communities is gendered.

Summary of your background

Social theory and applied research, with a particular interest in feminist epistemologies, qualitative methodologies, queer theory and gender studies. Recent academic research and writing has been concerned with the prevention of violence against women.

List of recent (last 5 years) and most prominent publications and media pieces

Coady, L, Taket, A & Crisp, BR 2018 'Working with young children and families' in A Taket & BR Crisp (eds), Eliminating gender-based violence, Routledge, London. (In press)

Taket, A, Busst, C, Coady, L & Crisp, BR 2016, The baby makes 3 plus project in the Great South Coast region: final report from the external evaluator, January 2016, Department of Justice and Regulation, Melbourne, Vic.

Which GLASS Strategic Research Area their work fits into

  • Leadership, participation, and livelihoods
  • Climate change and social sustainability

Rachel Mence

Contact

Email: Rachel.mence@monash.edu

Thesis title

Understanding and Improving Gender Diversity in the Public Transport Workforce

Supervisors

Prof Margaret Alston OAM Dr Kerri Whittenbury

What is your research about?

This project is part of the Sustainable and Effective Public Transport – Graduate Research Industry Partnership (SEPT-GRIP), sponsored by Transport for Victoria and Monash University, and is supervised by Professor Margaret Alston OAM and Dr Kerri Whittenbury. Having commenced in April 2016, this project is due for completion in July 2019.

Improved business performance and service provision are valued outcomes of a diverse workforce. However, achieving diversity requires more than organisational commitment to providing equal access to opportunities. Organisational dynamics are challenged by changes to the demographic composition of a workforce. Despite the passage of numerous legislative measures over the years to reduce barriers to the participation of women in employment, entrenched patterns of occupational gender segregation endure in many industries within Australia, particularly in occupations traditionally seen as “men’s work.”

Public transport delivers an essential service to community. A well-functioning society and economy relies on an effective, accessible public transport system. As such, the inclusion of female perspectives is essential to ensure gender differences in transport usage and mobility patterns are considered in public transport research, service design and delivery.

Transportation has very low female workforce participation rates, with those women employed in the sector clustered predominantly within traditionally female roles. With unprecedented growth in patronage and investment, workforce projections forecast significant skills shortages across the sector. Women’s participation is vital to the sustainable and effective growth of public transport in Victoria. The increasing presence of women in the sector provides an opportunity for the perspectives, values and priorities of a more diverse workforce to impact the culture, operational processes and strategic direction of public transportation organisations.

Working with multiple stakeholders across the transportation sector, this research aims to explore the experiences of women within the public transport sector in Victoria and to understand the barriers to their equal participation and progression. It will provide a new theoretical contribution on gender segregation in the labour market and harness the voices of women to shape a new dialogue around how best to integrate women into traditionally male-dominated sectors. By applying a gender lens to transportation systems, it also seeks to explore the wider social and economic benefits of addressing gender imbalance within the sector.

http://publictransportresearchgroup.info/portfolio-item/understanding-and-improving-gender-diversity-in-the-public-transport-workforce/

Summary of your background

Over the past 15 years, Rachel has worked in various research related roles across both market and social research, within both the private and public sectors. With many years of experience in providing project management, operational support and expertise in the translation of research problems into data-driven solutions, Rachel has a broad research background to inform her current work involving multiple stakeholders across the transport sector.

https://au.linkedin.com/in/rachel-mence-4b33a4b4

Identify which GLASS Strategic Research Area their work fits into

  • Gender, intersectionality, and culture
  • Leadership, participation, and livelihoods

Penny Pan

Contact

Email: Zhaoen.Pan@monash.edu
Phone: 990 31131

Thesis title

Social Workers Intervention into Rural Women’s Empowerment in Australia and China

Supervisors

Margaret Alston, Kerri Whittenbury

What is your research about?

Research how social workers empower rural women in Australia and China

Summary of your background

I come from Inner Mongolia in China. My bachelor and master degree are all about social welfare.

List of recent (last 5 years) and most prominent publications and media pieces

Producing publication is still in process

Which GLASS Strategic Research Area their work fits into

  • Gender, intersectionality, and culture
  • Leadership, participation, and livelihoods

Mae Proudley

Contact

Email: mapro5@student.monash.edu

Thesis title

People, Place & Fire

Supervisors

Assoc. Prof. Fiona McDermott

Prof. Margaret Alston

Certificates/Postgraduates/Degrees etc achieved

Bachelor of Arts (Hons), University of Melbourne
Master of Applied Science, RMIT

What is your research about?

Mae’s qualitative research investigates how people make meaning from disruption/displacement after bushfire. Through interviews with residents who survived, or were affected by, the 2009 Victorian ‘Black Saturday’ fires she is examining the ruptures that occur to the people-place relationship after a catastrophic event. People’s emotional response to the post-bushfire social and natural landscape is a key theme in her study. Mae’s narrative inquiry explores the complications, and transformations, that are triggered by disaster.

Mae is particularly interested in:

  • How people strive to recreate home and their everyday practices after disaster.
  • What the destruction of meaningful possessions means for a person’s ‘sense of self.’
  • How fire affected residents feel about the official language of ‘recovery.’
  • The sensory losses, such as bird song, and other overlooked nuances that comprise daily routines and contribute to personal identity and ‘sense of place.’
  • The influence of gender, life cycle and socioeconomics in post-disaster, rebuild or relocate, decision-making.
  • The temporal component of living in a post-disaster landscape – distorted experience of time.

Personal growth after a traumatic event.

Summary of your background

Prior to commencing her PhD Mae worked in a research position at the Centre for Risk & Community Safety at RMIT. She was engaged in analysing the bushfire experience from a domestic perspective. The role of families, women and children in particular, during a fire event (Wangary Fire in South Australia, January 2005) was her primary focus.

Mae has worked in several State Government Departments and in a public housing advocacy and community development role for the Brotherhood of St. Laurence.

List of recent (last 5 years) and most prominent publications and media pieces

Proudley, M 2013, ‘Place Matters’, Australian Journal of Emergency Management, vol. 28, no. 2, pp. 11-16. 
Proudley, M 2008,‘Fire, families and decisions’,

Australian Journal of Emergency Management, vol. 23, no. 1, pp. 37-43.

Which GLASS Strategic Research Area their work fits into

Climate Change & Social Sustainability

Migration & People Movement


Margareta Windisch

Contact

Email: margareta.windisch@monash.edu

Thesis title

Urban heatwaves, gendered social vulnerabilities and cooling adaptation measures

Supervisors

Margaret Alston, Kerri Whittenbury

Certificates/Postgraduates/Degrees etc achieved

Master of Social Work (Monash University)
Bachelor of Social Work (University of Melbourne)

What is your research about?

The research aims to explore how social vulnerability in urban heatwaves is both socially constructed and gendered. Older women are particularity vulnerable as a consequence of entrenched and systemic gender inequality. Using a feminist perspective the project will 'denaturalise' heatwave disasters, investigating unequal access to opportunities and unequal exposures as reasons for high heatwave morbidity and mortality.

Summary of your background

I currently teach in the Social Work degree and the Diplomas of Community Services and Development at Victoria University and work casually as a sexual assault counsellor at the Sexual Assault Crisis Line. I have been active in a range of social movement with a focus on women’s rights and climate justice.

Which GLASS Strategic Research Area their work fits into

  • Climate change and social sustainability