Metabolism, Ageing and Genomics

The Metabolism, Ageing and Genomics Division comprises four major groups with a unanimous focus on research that explores ways to keep older Australians living longer, healthier and more productive lives. The Units are leaders in conducting randomised controlled trials in primary care, namely conducting research in collaboration with GPs on behalf of the medical community.

The Metabolism, Ageing and Genomics Division fosters opportunities to engage, up-skill and promote clinical research in the community.

Units

Diabetes and Vascular Medicine Unit

The Unit is led by Professor Sophia Zoungas and strives toward discovering what makes some people more susceptible to developing certain age-related chronic conditions. Research spans the biological, physiological, psychological and physical and focuses on how to identify those people at greatest risk of these conditions like diabetes, heart disease and stroke. The work of the group aims to tailor available public health information, therapies and treatments to those at greatest risk of these conditions, promoting a healthier longer life.

Statins in Reducing Events in the Elderly (STAREE)

One of the Division's main clinical trials is the STAREE (STAtins in Reducing Events in the Elderly) trial. This large scale trial conducted through general practices across Australia aims to explore the impact of statin therapy for primary prevention (prevention of a first heart attack or stroke) in people aged 70 years and above.

Monash Ageing Research Centre (MONARC)

Led by Professor Barbara Workman, the Monash Ageing Research Centre (MONARC) is based at the Kingston Centre – a stand-alone sub-acute facility based in Cheltenham (Victoria) which provides Geriatric Evaluation and Management, Aged Persons Mental Health, and Rehabilitation.

Public Health Genomics Program

The Public Health Genomics Program explores the role of human genetic data in public and population health. Led by Dr Paul Lacaze, the program conducts research centred around the genetic analyses of large cohorts, clinical trials and patient registries.