Meet the team

Dr Karin Hammarberg

Senior Research Fellow

Dr Karin HammarbergDr Karin Hammarberg has been a member of the Global and Women’s Health team since 2011. She is a Registered Nurse with 20 years’ experience as a clinical co-ordinator of IVF programs. Dr Hammarberg completed her PhD in 2006, and since then has been a member of research teams working on a broad range of studies using quantitative and qualitative methods.

Dr Hammarberg’s passion is research translation and making evidence-based health information available to the public and health and education professionals.

"I am exploring ways to help people optimise their health before conception, and opportunities for improving health and education professionals’ capacity to discuss fertility and preconception health with people throughout the reproductive lifespan,” says Dr Hammarberg of her current work.

Dr Hammarberg is a member of two Centres of Research Excellence; Women and Non-Communicable Diseases (WaND) and Sexual and Reproductive Health for Women in Primary Care (SPHERE). She works with the Victorian Assisted Reproductive Treatment Authority (VARTA) producing accessible resources about fertility, infertility and infertility treatment. A recent Australian Research Council grant will expand Dr Hammarberg’s work to include a project investigating emerging assisted reproduction markets in Southern Africa.

My passion is research translation and making evidence-based health information available to the public and health and education professionals.

Dr Hammarberg says that for her, the most important aspect of the work within Global and Women’s Health is the generation of evidence that has the potential to advance health equity for people globally and reduce gendered disadvantage.

“With my special interest in the psychosocial consequences of infertility, I also think that developing low-cost models of IVF to improve access to infertility care for people in low- and middle-income countries is an important goal,” she says.

Regarding the impact of the pandemic, Dr Hammarberg believes COVID-19 has changed the world in many ways.

“From a global perspective, COVID-19 highlights health inequalities where the poorest are at greatest risk of contracting and dying from the disease. From a local perspective, our research shows that COVID-19 and its associated restrictions has had a significant negative effect on people’s mental health.

“As we recover, I am hoping that together we can build a more inclusive and fair society where people feel safe and valued and have enough resources to live a dignified life,” she concludes.