Meet the team

Dr Karin Stanzel

Research Fellow

Dr Karin StanzelDr Karin Stanzel trained as a nurse in Germany and after migrating to Melbourne, undertook a bachelor of nursing, followed by a graduate diploma in community health. She worked in community health, mainly focusing on young people and women’s health. Dr Stanzel completed midwifery training in 2004 and, in 2020, completed her PhD examing health literacy and health care needs in midlife among migrant women from low- and middle-income countries.

Dr Stanzel is currently working on a project that generates evidence about the characteristics of women and their infants or toddlers admitted to a residential Early Parenting Program at the Masada Private Hospital. It examines indicators of short and medium impact to inform benchmarking of current clinical practice and will provide a comparison for new and enhanced services.

She is also involved in the Centre of Research Excellence on Women and Non-communicable Disease (CRE WaND) project to help translate research findings. Dr Stanzel’s PhD research found that health information is widely available on the internet and women use the internet to access information. However, for women who don’t speak English well, there is very limited information available.

Dr Stanzel sees equality and equity for women as one of the most important global health issues and believes that collaboration is key.

Dr Stanzel sees equality and equity for women as one of the most important global health issues and believes that collaboration is key. While COVID-19 has layered additional challenges on to existing problems, Dr Stanzel believes that “high-income countries have the resources to lift low and middle-income countries out of poverty, but this requires global collaboration.”

“Like any major incident, COVID-19 has had a significant impact on the world,” says Dr Stanzel. But she is also of the belief that it is not all bad. “Many innovative ideas and movements have resulted and these should be celebrated, while the loss of life, economic hardship and emotional and mental ill health must also be acknowledged.”

Dr Stanzel was hospitalised for three weeks at a young age, and the kindness and empathy she experienced by nursing staff inspired her to pursue a career in nursing.

“I was inspired by a nurse who was very kind and caring, to become a nurse. Patients are very vulnerable and a kind and caring nurse can make all the difference to a patient’s experience,” she says.