Discover our People

DIGITAL CIVICS, HOW TO ADDRESS MATTER OF SOCIAL JUSTICE AND INEQUALITY

Professor Patrick Oliver

Professor Patrick Olivier
Societal Informatics
Faculty of Information Technology
Monash University

Professor Patrick Olivier, world-renowned human-computer interaction expert, works with social informatics and human-centred computing experts to develop digital services addressing matter of social justice and inequality. Patrick coined the term 'digital civics' and explored the concept of ‘commissioning platform’ for services. “Digital civics explores how digital technologies could promote more participation in designing and delivering public services. For example, the App Movement Platform provides a platform for users to ‘commission’ their own location-based review systems, to highlight specific issues and maintain a trusted information source on locations to e.g. breastfeed, access free condoms, fly drones…”. The technology bridges the gap between government and citizens. ”Digital civics aims to leverage technology to foster environments in which local agents solve problems together”. Patrick also led the development of widely adopted open source software and hardware projects (AX3, Intake24, BuildAX). (Professor Patrick Olivier, Societal Informatics research group, FIT, Monash University)

March 2019 - Read more


FROM VISUAL TO DESIGN ETHNOGRAPHY, HOW PEOPLE EXPERIENCE TECHNOLOGY

Professor Sarah Pink
Director of the Emerging Technologies Research Lab
Monash University

Professor Sarah Pink is world leading design anthropologist and expert in interdisciplinary methodologies for research, dissemination and engagement. “Most of my work focuses on understanding how people experience, live and imagine futures with technologies. People don't think of their activities as being energy-consuming. Instead they think of them as creating the right feeling at home, by playing music, lighting or heating and cooling the home. Similarly, people won't think of future AI assistants or self-driving cars in relation to the demands they make on energy, but as technologies that help them to achieve what they need in everyday life”. Sarah started to do research in the Energy Sector in 2010. For her, investigating how people use today’s technology is a starting point to conceptualize the technologies of tomorrow. (Professor Sarah Pink, Professor of Design and Emerging Technologies, Director of the Emerging Technologies Research Lab, Monash University)

March 2019 - Read more


FROM SILICON TO PEROVSKITE, A JOURNEY IN THE FIELD OF SOLAR CELLS

Dorota Bacall
3rd year PhD candidate
Chemical Engineering
Monash University

Dorota’s research focuses on perovskites at the Advanced Photovoltaic Lab, where device fabrication techniques and optimisation work are undertaken to maximise their efficiency. “The Udo Bach research group is the only lab in the world that successfully produced back-contact perovskite solar cells, allowing real time measurement of the perovskite layer during the manufacturing process”Easily-manufactured, low-cost, efficient perovskite cells could revolutionise the solar energy industry.Dorota and colleagues also work on increasing perovskite cells lifetime and durability. ”We measure solar cells during the exposure to some gases; how fast and what concentration affects the perovskite layer”. Dorota’s interest in renewable energy also targets biofuel. “Together with Biofuel innovations, I’m looking at developing a sustainable business model of algae biofuel production”. Her presence at the COP24 reinforced her belief that a synergy of renewable energy sources is required to meet global electricity demand. (Dorota Bacal, PhD candidate in Chemical Engineering, Monash University)

March 2019 - Read more


THE ROLE OF SOLAR ENERGY IN A NET ZERO EMISSION WORLD

Mr Peter Lusis
2nd year PhD candidate
Energy Systems Planning
Monash University

Peter gained experience in developing solar PV projects while working with UNDP and Renewable World. During his first visit to Monash as an exchange student in 2016, he learned about the Monash microgrid project what made him consider undertaking a PhD.“My research is about designing the most cost-effective solution on how to accommodate more solar PV in residential areas while providing a safe network operation. Instead of undertaking expensive network upgrades, we can increase PV hosting capacity through coordinated control of power electronics, so customers can install solar PV systems and facilitate the decarbonisation of electricity grid at minimal additional cost. First, you need to understand what are the network physical and operational limits. Then, you bring all this information into an optimisation model, to either minimise energy losses or costs. And, finally economics, we always need to consider relevant energy policies, electricity tariffs, as well as investment and maintenance costs”. (Peter Lusis, PhD candidate in Energy Systems Planning, FIT, Monash University)

March 2019 - Read more