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4 July–25 August 2007

Curator: Victoria Lynn

Part 1: Faculty Gallery, Caulfield Campus, 5 July - 28 July 2007

Part 2: Monash University Museum of Art, Clayton Campus, 4 July – 25 August 2007

Texts: Yael Bartana, Janet Burchill and Jennifer McCamley, Max Delany, Willie Doherty, David Griggs, Ghassan Hage, Victoria Lynn, Lucia Madriz, Tom Nicholson, r e a, Lázaro A. Saavedra-González, Sriwhana Spong, Lynette Wallworth.

Regarding Fear and Hope examines two abiding emotions that are dominating the contemporary political and cultural landscape. Exploring the ways in which artists form connections with this milieu, the exhibition includes works that consider diverse identities, immigration, conflict, surveillance, and the challenging economic and political environments in which we live. This exhibition will feature the work of both Australian and international artists, including Yael Bartana (Israel); Janet Burchill and Jennifer McCamley (Australia); Willie Doherty (Northern Ireland); David Griggs (Australia); Lucía Madriz (Costa Rica); Tom Nicholson (Australia); r e a (Australia); Lázaro A. Saavedra-González (Cuba); Sriwhana Spong (New Zealand) and Lynette Wallworth (Australia).

Regarding Fear and Hope tackles the emotional tenor of our times. The exhibition aims to investigate and register the political and cultural dimensions of these emotional states. There is an increasing and pervading sense of ‘fear’ in our midst, made manifest in some of the more extreme attitudes to immigrants and asylum seekers, but also in responses to the abstract notions of change, risk and difference. It is perhaps not so much that we are actually fearful, but that fear itself is more present today, as a concept, a justification, an irritant and a political concern.

A counterpoint to fear is hope – and one of the urgent questions of our time is whether we can have hope or not. Hope is an emotion that many of us have experienced at one time or another. But a sense of hope in the wake of fear is altogether different. Hope requires faith in human behaviour. As Victoria Lynn has suggested:

This is not an exhibition about ‘emotions’ in the personal sense of its meaning. Regarding Fear and Hope tackles the states of fear and receding horizons of hope. Art has the capacity to convey such states, or at least to respond to them with both aesthetic and ethical means. The exhibition will be accompanied by a full colour illustrated catalogue featuring essays by exhibition curator, Victoria Lynn and Ghassan Hage, author and Chair of Anthropology at the University of Sydney.

Exhibition resources:

Media kit

Exhibition Catalogue:

Regarding Fear and Hope. Purchase via MUMA Shop.

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