Visiting zebrafish expert at Monash

The FishCore facility at ARMI is one of the largest zebrafish research facilities in the southern hemisphere.

The FishCore facility at ARMI is one of the largest zebrafish research facilities in the southern hemisphere.

It's another growth opportunity for Monash University's regenerative medicine arm, with a visit from international genetics expert Professor Miguel Allende this week.

Professor Allende, currently Director of the FONDAP Center for Genome Regulation at Universidad de Chile, is well-known for his decades of research in developmental genetics, with a focus on the developmental biology and molecular genetics of zebrafish. 

As part of his visit to Monash, hosted by the Monash University Australian Regenerative Medicine Institute (ARMI), Professor Allende will give a talk on his most recent work on 'Examining cell behaviours induced by damage to the zebrafish nervous system'. He will also describe his novel findings from studying South American fish such as the genus Orestias, which inhabit the high altitude salt lakes of Chile and also the genus Austrolebias, annual fish endemic to Uruguay.

ARMI is a $153 million medical research centre that officially opened at the Monash University Clayton campus in April 2009. One of the main facilities at ARMI is FishCore, the largest zebrafish facility of its kind in the southern hemisphere, funded by Monash University, ARMI, and the Victorian Government through the Department of Innovation, Industry and Regional Development. 

ARMI group leader, Dr Mirana Ramialison, said Professor Allende's visit to ARMI is a boost for ARMI's international research reputation.

"As the most significant zebrafish facility in Australia, the work we do here contributes hugely to the global knowledge pool in developmental genetics," Dr Ramialison said.

"It's important that we continue to foster international collaboration and make new advances as we work alongside colleagues from all over the world.

"Professor Allende's presence at Monash University is exciting for us and we're honoured to have him share his expertise and insight with us as a pioneer of genomics studies in native South American fish species." 

'Examining cell behaviours induced by damage to the zebrafish nervous system' will be held from 12 to 1 pm on Tuesday 11 February at the 3rd floor Conference Room, Building 75, Monash University Clayton campus.