Michael Bertram

Michael Bertram

Michael Bertram

  • Student type: Domestic
  • Degree type: PhD
  • Year commenced: 2012
  • Degree(s): Graduate Bachelor of Science
  • Major(s): Biological and life sciences; Psychology; Zoology
  • Specialisation: PhD student in Biological Sciences Formerly BA/BSc at Monash Majoring in Psychology and Zoology followed by an Honours year in Biological Sciences.

Michael Bertram completed a BA/BSc at Monash in 2012, majoring in psychology and zoology, respectively, followed by an Honours year in the School of Biological Sciences. He commenced his PhD in the School of Biological Sciences in March 2014. 

Michael works in the field of behavioural ecotoxicology, investigating the impacts of widespread endocrine disrupting pollutants released from agricultural operations on sexual selection and reproductive processes in fish. In experiments are multidisciplinary in approach; he and his collaborators are investigating the effects of exposure to these chemical contaminants on reproductive behaviour, morphology, physiology, histopathology and sperm performance. 


"I was initially attracted to the BA/BSc at Monash because I was unsure about what I wanted to study, and this gave me wide exposure to a variety of subjects. During my BSc, I became aware that the School of Biological Sciences is a world-leader in the fields of ecology and conservation biology. This was a perfect fit, as I was becoming increasingly interested in studying the effects of human-induced environmental change on ecological and evolutionary processes in wild animal populations. The collaborative atmosphere and world-leading facilities in the Faculty of Science made it my first choice as a platform to pursue my research.

"The mentoring by my supervisors Associate Professor Bob Wong and Dr Minna Saaristo was invaluable during my Honours year and now, as a PhD student. I am extremely grateful to them for for their constant encouragement, feedback and advice. The exceptional quality of teaching and research in the Faculty of Science and the School of Biological Sciences is what stoked my interest in science and, in particular, zoology. Further, having access to state-of-the-art facilities like the Jock Marshall Reserve, where I run my chemical exposures, is hugely beneficial to my research. 

"One of the perks of being a postgraduate student is not only being able to conduct your own research, but also to experience the work of others. I always love receiving invitations to tour other labs and am continually amazed by the quality and diversity of research taking place at Monash. From seeing the 3-D printing of extinct marsupial lion teeth to touring the Australian Regenerative Medicine Institute's FishCore, the largest zebrafish facility in the Southern Hemisphere, these experiences are always interesting and can lead to exciting new collaborations!"