A/Prof Jeff Stilwell - Honours Projects

Cretaceous apex predators from extreme greenhouse Earth ecosystems and associated environments

Supervisor: Assoc. Prof. Jeffrey Stilwell
Field of Study: Earth Science /Palaeontology
Support Offered: All associated costs
Collaborating Organisation: Peretti Museum Foundation (Switzerland) and ANSTO/Australian Synchrotron

New discoveries from the Cretaceous Period, an extreme and protracted greenhouse Earth interval in the late Mesozoic, provide significant data to reconstruct these ancient, dynamic ecosystems of apex predators and their inferred prey. The project seeks to describe recently discovered fossil material in order to better understand the myriad life living in 'hothouse' conditions. Advanced imaging, utilising the Australian Synchrotron and BK imaging system, among other platforms as appropriate, take the research to the highest calibre level that Australia can offer to showcase palaeontology endeavours on a national and international stage.

For further information contact: Jeffrey Stilwell

Fossiliferous amber from the Paleogene of Tasmania and Victoria--new discoveries support the antiquity of modern Australian biotas and ecosystems'

Supervisor: Assoc. Prof. Jeffrey Stilwell
Field of Study: Earth Science/Palaeontology
Support Offered: All associated costs
Collaborating Organisation: Faculty of Science Strategic Uplift Grant and ANSTO/Australian Synchrotron

New discoveries from the mid-Paleogene Period, an extreme and protracted greenhouse Earth interval at the beginning of the Cenozoic Era, provide significant new data to reconstruct these ancient, dynamic ecosystems of animals, plants and microorganisms. The project seeks to describe recently discovered fossil material in amber (ancient tree resin) resulting from significant outcomes related to an awarded Australian Research Council Discovery Grant to Assoc. Prof. Jeff Stilwell in order to better understand the myriad life living during the Early Eocene Climatic Optimum and shortly thereafter prior to the final break-up of Gondwana and the separation of Australia and Antarctica. Many groups of organisms have been recorded as fossils for the first time in Australia, including ants and springtails, among other arthropod groups. Advanced imaging, utilising the Australian Synchrotron and BK imaging system, among other platforms as appropriate, take the research to the highest calibre level that Australia can offer to showcase palaeontology endeavours on a national and international stage.

For further information contact: Jeffrey Stilwell