Available projects in a sub-area

School of Earth, Atmosphere and Environment

Visualisations of the Dynamical Atmosphere
Code Start date Value Contact
197 13 January 2015 (negotiable) $3799.98
($633.33 x 6 weeks)
Dr. Laura O'Brien
Email: laura.obrien@monash.edu
Research profile: Dr. Laura O'Brien

More information about project #197
Prerequisites
A background in Maths and/or Physics.
Some programming experience would help but is not essential.
Additional details
This project has the potential to take 2 students
Applications
Applications closed on Monday, 11 August 2014.
Can reanalysis data capture upper-air observations over Antarctica?
Code Start date Value Contact
200 12 January 2015 (negotiable) $3799.98
($633.33 x 6 weeks)
Dr. Ailie Gallant
Email: ailie.gallant@monash.edu
Phone: (03) 9905 3216
Research profile: Dr. Ailie Gallant

More information about project #200
Prerequisites
Second to third year level atmospheric science, mathematics, physics or computer science students. Computer programming experience is desired but not essential. Experience in one of Python, R, Matlab or IDL is preferable.
Additional details
Shortlisted applicants will be required to attend an interview either in person or on Skype, and to provide an academic transcript.
Applications
Applications closed on Monday, 11 August 2014.
Extreme rainfall in southern Australia: link to moisture from the tropics
Code Start date Value Contact
225 12 January 2015 (negotiable) $3799.98
($633.33 x 6 weeks)
Dr Jennifer Catto
Email: jennifer.catto@monash.edu
Research profile: Dr Jennifer Catto

More information about project #225
Prerequisites
The candidate should have an interest in atmospheric or climate science and basic knowledge in Matlab, IDL, Python, or another visualisation software package.
Applications
Applications closed on Monday, 13 October 2014.
Is the recent increased rainfall in north-west Australia represented in climate models?
Code Start date Value Contact
295 12 January 2015 (negotiable) $3799.98
($633.33 x 6 weeks)
Dr Duncan Ackerley
Email: duncan.ackerley@monash.edu
Phone: 03 9902 4900
Research profile: Dr Duncan Ackerley

More information about project #295
Prerequisites
An ability to use Matlab, IDL, Python or other visualisation software package is required and a willingness to perform statistical analyses on large datasets. A general knowledge of meteorology (particularly tropical meteorology) would also be desirable.
Applications
Applications closed on Monday, 13 October 2014.
Stability of startup Couette flow
Code Start date Value Contact
420 6 July 2015 (negotiable) $1350
($450 x 3 weeks)
Dr Anja Slim
Email: anja.slim@monash.edu
Research profile: Dr Anja Slim

More information about project #420
Prerequisites
MTH3360 Fluid dynamics
Applications
Applications closed on Friday, 22 May 2015.
Formation of ore deposits and the cosedimentation of droplets and crystals
Code Start date Value Contact
421 6 July 2015 (negotiable) $1350
($450 x 3 weeks)
Dr Anja Slim
Email: anja.slim@monash.edu
Research profile: Dr Anja Slim

More information about project #421
Prerequisites
Third year or higher science or engineering student with experience running experiments.
Applications
Applications closed on Friday, 22 May 2015.
Characterizing extreme precipitating fronts
Code Start date Value Contact
535 1 December 2015 (negotiable) $3799.98
($633.33 x 6 weeks)
Dr Jennifer Catto
Email: jennifer.catto@monash.edu
Research profile: Dr Jennifer Catto

More information about project #535
Prerequisites
Interest in weather and climate is a must, and experience in a programming language such as NCL, IDL, Matlab or Python is required.
Additional details
Please email me (Jennifer Catto) if you are interested in applying for this project.
Applications
Applications closed on Friday, 9 October 2015.
Synoptic-scale patterns associated with severe weather outbreaks in Southeast Australia
Code Start date Value Contact
555 11 January 2016 (negotiable) $3798
($633 x 6 weeks)
Dr Robert Warren
Email: rob.warren@monash.edu
Research profile: Dr Robert Warren

More information about project #555
Prerequisites
The work for this project will involve extensive programming; therefore, some experience with a language such as Python, Matlab, or IDL is a requirement. Knowledge of the statistical methods being employed (principal component analysis and K-Means clustering) and experience working with large datasets is desirable but not necessary.
Applications
Applications closed on Friday, 9 October 2015.
Ressessing the initiation and predictability of El Nino events
Code Start date Value Contact
590 1 December 2018 (negotiable) $3799.98
($633.33 x 6 weeks)
Dr Shayne McGregor
Email: shayne.mcgregor@monash.edu
Research profile: Dr Shayne McGregor

More information about project #590
Prerequisites
As the work for this project will involve numerical modelling and data anslysis, some experience and/or interest with a programming language such as Python, Matlab, R, or IDL is desired.
Applications
Applications closed on Friday, 5 October 2018.
The role of the stratospheric circulation in predicting the troposphere
Code Start date Value Contact
593 7 December 2015 (negotiable) $3780
($630 x 6 weeks)
Prof Christian Jakob
Email: christian.jakob@monash.edu
Research profile: Prof Christian Jakob
Prerequisites
Second or third year, Programming skills in Matlab, Python or equivalent.
Additional details
To find out more about this project or see other available projects of the ARC COE for Climate System Science visit http://www.climatescience.org.au/content/331-undergraduate-summer-research-scholarships
Applications
Applications closed on Friday, 9 October 2015.
The role of clouds in the vertical temperature structure of the tropical atmosphere
Code Start date Value Contact
594 7 December 2015 (negotiable) $3780
($630 x 6 weeks)
Prof Christian Jakob
Email: christian.jakob@monash.edu
Research profile: Prof Christian Jakob
Prerequisites
Second or third year, Programming skills in Matlab, Python or equivalent.
Additional details
To find out more about this project or see other available projects of the ARC COE for Climate System Science visit http://www.climatescience.org.au/content/331-undergraduate-summer-research-scholarships
Applications
Applications closed on Friday, 9 October 2015.
How did the zebra rock get its stripes?
Code Start date Value Contact
702 30 November 2015 (negotiable) $3600
($450 x 8 weeks)
Dr Anja Slim
Email: anja.slim@monash.edu
Research profile: Dr Anja Slim

More information about project #702
Prerequisites
Completed at least two years of university studies; preferably some lab experience.
Additional details
Duration is flexible (6-12 weeks)
Applications
Applications closed on Friday, 9 October 2015.
Simple Climate Model Projects
Code Start date Value Contact
767 1 December 2015 (negotiable) $3780
($630 x 6 weeks)
Dietmar Dommenget
Email: dietmar.dommenget@monash.edu
Phone: 99054495
Research profile: Dietmar Dommenget

More information about project #767
Prerequisites
ATM2020, climate dynamics, MTH2010, calculus, basic statistics, experience and interest in programming (UNIX, FORTRAN, MATLAB, etc) and data analysis.
Applications
Applications closed on Friday, 9 October 2015.
Artificial Intelligence to make the Super-Geo
Code Start date Value Contact
1160 21 November 2016 (negotiable) $6000
($500 x 12 weeks)
Prof Tom Drummond & Associate Prof Steven Micklethwaite
Email: steven.micklethwaite@monash.edu
Phone: 0428231002
Prerequisites
Experience programming, knowledge of calculus and fourier transforms. Interest in the Earth Sciences and cutting-edge interdisciplinary research.
Additional details
Semantic Vision is artificial intelligence for images etc. It's a rapidly developing field, likely to transform both industry and daily life in the near future. Here, we will adapt and trial Semantic Vision approaches to automatically map and interpret faults and fractures from photographs and point clouds of geological exposures from mines and coastal outcrops, which were collected by drones. This project could lead to large transformations in the Earth and Environmental sciences, massively decreasing the time taken for scientists to make interpretations.

This project is a collaboration between the Centre for Robotics Vision, and the School of Earth, Atmosphere and Environment, and will require a numeric and computationally advanced student.

This is a shared project between Earth Science (Faculty of Science) and Robotic Vision (Faculty Engineering).
  • Prof Drummond will supervise the semantic vision code translation.
  • Assoc Prof Micklethwaite will supervise the geological interpretation and end-user requirements.
Applications
Applications closed on Friday, 7 October 2016.
Reconciling differences between satellite and observed ocean surface winds
Code Start date Value Contact
1170 1 December 2018 (negotiable) $3799.98
($633.33 x 6 weeks)
Dr Shayne McGregor
Email: shayne.mcgregor@monash.edu
Research profile: Dr Shayne McGregor

More information about project #1170
Prerequisites
As the work for this project will involve numerical modelling and data anslysis, some experience and/or interest with a programming language such as Python, Matlab, or IDL is desired.
Applications
Applications closed on Friday, 5 October 2018.
Understanding trends in tropical upper-tropospheric temperature
Code Start date Value Contact
1268 9 January 2018 (negotiable) $3780
($630 x 6 weeks)
Dr. Martin Singh
Email: martin.singh@monash.edu
Research profile: Dr. Martin Singh

More information about project #1268
Prerequisites
Open to students with some mathematical background (MTH1030 or equivalent) and an interest in climate/atmospheric science. Programming experience also desirable.
Applications
Applications closed on Friday, 28 July 2017.
Exploring relationships between lightning, radar-derived hail diagnostics, and hail damage
Code Start date Value Contact
1310 15 January 2018 (negotiable) $3799.98
($633.33 x 6 weeks)
Dr Robert Warren
Email: rob.warren@monash.edu

More information about project #1310
Prerequisites
The work for this project will involve extensive programming; therefore, some experience with a data analysis and visualisation language such as Python, Matlab, or IDL is a requirement. Understanding of basic statistics (e.g. linear regression) and an interest in atmospheric science are also desirable.
Applications
Applications closed on Friday, 6 October 2017.
The dynamics of the onset of the northern Australian monsoon
Code Start date Value Contact
1777 19 November 2018 (negotiable) $3799.98
($633.33 x 6 weeks)
Dr. Sugata Narsey
Email: sugata.narsey@monash.edu
Research profile: Dr. Sugata Narsey

More information about project #1777
Prerequisites
Some knowledge of atmospheric dynamics and Python programming would be helpful.
Additional details
Most of the rainfall over northern Australia occurs between December and April, and is critical to life in the region. However, this rain does not fall at a steady and continuous rate throughout the season – instead it occurs sporadically in bursts that can last from days to weeks followed by relatively dry breaks in the monsoonal rain that last for similar periods. The first of these heavy rainfall bursts is often referred to as the onset of the Australian monsoon.

In this project, you will investigate the atmospheric dynamics associated with the onset of the monsoon, for example, the influence of mid-latitude and tropical disturbances. You will gain useful and transferable skills in data analysis and programming, as well as an opportunity to contribute to an exciting and active area of research in Australian weather and climate science.
Applications
Applications closed on Friday, 5 October 2018.
Is tropical rainfall becoming more clustered?
Code Start date Value Contact
1783 3 January 2019 (negotiable) $3798
($633 x 6 weeks)
Dr Martin Singh
Email: martin.singh@monash.edu
Research profile: Dr Martin Singh

More information about project #1783
Prerequisites
This project involves computational analysis, and so strong coding skills, including familiarity with a language such as Python, R, or MATLAB, are highly desirable.
Additional details
The heaviest rainfall events are expected to become more intense as the climate warms. However, the rate at which such events will intensify remains highly uncertain, particularly in the tropics.

Recent studies have suggested that the tendency of thunderstorms to clump together into clusters may have a profound effect on the observed rainfall distribution. A high degree of clustering results in heavier rainfall rates.

In this project, we will investigate the clustering of thunderstorms using satellite observations of rainfall in the tropics. In particular, we will examine the question of whether rainfall in the tropics is becoming more clustered, and what effect this may have on heavy precipitation now and into the future.
Applications
Applications closed on Friday, 5 October 2018.
Lifecycles of hail storms on the east coast of Australia
Code Start date Value Contact
1815 7 January 2019 (negotiable) $3798
($633 x 6 weeks)
Dr Rob Warren
Email: rob.warren@monash.edu

More information about project #1815
Prerequisites
Students should be in their second, third, or post-honours year and interested in pursuing honours or a postgraduate degree in atmospheric science. Some programming experience with a data analysis and visualisation language such as Python, Matlab, or IDL is a requirement.
Applications
Applications closed on Friday, 5 October 2018.
Impact of tropical sea surface temperatures on climate extremes in Australia
Code Start date Value Contact
1816 5 January 2019 (negotiable) $3798
($633 x 6 weeks)
Dr. Ghyslaine Boschat
Email: Ghyslaine.Boschat@monash.edu

More information about project #1816
Applications
Applications closed on Friday, 5 October 2018.
What sets the position of the monsoon?
Code Start date Value Contact
2076 1 December 2019 (negotiable) $3798
($633 x 6 weeks)
Dr Martin Singh
Email: martin.singh@monash.edu
Research profile: Dr Martin Singh
Prerequisites
Students require multivariable calculus (MTH2010).
Programming skills (e.g., MATLAB, python) are useful, but not required.
Some previous knowledge of atmospheric science is helpful, but not required.
Additional details
Project description: Monsoons are an important source of freshwater for a large fraction of the global population. Monsoon precipitation is known to occur in regions where the surface temperature and humidity are high, but a precise theory for the position of the monsoon is still lacking. In this project we will evaluate a recent theory for the location of the monsoon which posits that spatial gradients in the surface temperature and humidity are important in setting its location. We will examine observations of Earth’s surface and troposphere to determine if the observed circulation structures are consistent with the theory. Further work may also involve examining the output of climate models to determine if they also match theory.
Applications
Applications closed on Friday, 26 July 2019.
The Antarctic ozone hole and Australian rainfall
Code Start date Value Contact
2419 1 January 2021 (negotiable) $3799.98
($633.33 x 6 weeks)
Professor Julie Arblaster
Email: julie.arblaster@monash.edu
Research profile: Professor Julie Arblaster
Additional details
Springtime stratospheric ozone depletion over Antarctica from the late 1970s to 2000 has been linked to changes in the surface climate over the Southern Hemisphere in summer, via a poleward shift in the westerly winds over the Southern Ocean, a more positive Southern Annular Mode (SAM) and an expansion of the tropics. Over Australian latitudes, a more positive SAM is associated with increased rainfall over eastern Australia in the summer season. Given stratospheric ozone over Antarctica is projected to recover to 1980 levels by ~2050, the impact of ozone recovery on its own would be to reduce this upward trend in summertime rainfall over eastern Australia.

However future projections of rainfall over Australia are also impacted by increasing greenhouse gases which will have a competing effect on any anthropogenic rainfall trends in summer. In this project you will investigate the contribution of these effects on Australian rainfall changes in the latest climate models contributing to the Detection and Attribution Model Intercomparison Project (DAMIP). These are now available on the National Computing Infrastructure (NCI) supercomputer and are being used as input into the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change’s Sixth Assessment Report.
Applications
Applications closed on Friday, 2 October 2020.
Characteristics of the Southern Hemisphere Jet Stream
Code Start date Value Contact
2766 1 December 2021 (negotiable) $3798
($633 x 6 weeks)
Dr Tess Parker
Email: tess.parker@monash.edu
Research profile: Dr Tess Parker
Prerequisites
This project is most suitable for a candidate with an atmospheric science or mathematics background. Experience in coding (e.g. Python, Matlab) is very useful, but not essential. Students should be interested in learning more about climate science and academic research, and be contemplating further honours or postgraduate study.
Additional details
Project Description: The jet stream is a band of strong westerly winds in the upper atmosphere. The behaviour of the jet is the dominant source of variability in weather patterns across much of the midlatitudes. But the jet is variable, both in position (latitude and/or longitude) and in maximum wind speeds. The jet also varies between strong and steady, and weak and variable. Shifts in the jet are associated with shifts in the storm tracks, with associated changes in regional weather and rainfall. This project will look at methods to characterise the position and strength of the jet stream in the Southern Hemisphere, with a focus on changes in the Australian region with time.
Applications
Applications closed on Friday, 27 August 2021.
Trends in Atmospheric Rivers over Eastern Australia
Code Start date Value Contact
2901 30 January 2023 (negotiable) $2532
($633 x 4 weeks)
Dr Kimberley Reid
Email: kim.reid@monash.edu
Research profile: Dr Kimberley Reid
Prerequisites
Experience with atmospheric sciences is ideal but candidates with maths, physics or computer science backgrounds also considered.
Candidates should have completed at least one second-year maths subject (e.g. vector calculus, differential equations, probability and statistics).
Previous experience with programming is desirable (e.g. Python, Matlab, R), but will accept people who are willing to learn.
Additional details
Eastern Australia has experienced its 4th major flood in 18 months. While the dynamics between these weather events can vary, one thing they all have in common is strong atmospheric water vapour transport over the east coast contributing to prolonged rainfall.

The aim of this project is to quantify trends in atmospheric water vapour transport over the east coast of Australia in order to help us understand how rainfall patterns may change in the future.
Applications
Applications closed on Friday, 26 August 2022.