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Ramm Lab research

CollaborationsStudent research projects | Publications

About Associate Professor Georg Ramm

MSc (Diplom), Biochemistry, 1995, Max-Planck-Research Unit, Halle, Germany
PhD, Cell Biology, 2000, Utrecht University, The Netherlands


Our research

Our lab is focused on high-resolution imaging of cellular architecture and intracellular trafficking. We are the first in Australia to use cryo-tomography (on Titan Krios) in combination with cryo-focused ion beam milling (cryo-FIB on cryo-Helios) to reveal cellular structures at the highest resolution. We focus on fundamental cell biological problems that are relevant to human diseases. This includes the intracellular degradation of organelles by autophagy and mitophagy, mitochondrial ultrastructure and dynamics in healthy and stressed cells, and cellular structural changes during cell death.

Current projects

High-resolution imaging of mitochondria under stress

Cryo-electron tomography (CET) allows for the highest resolution cellular imaging achievable at the moment. To get access to all areas of the cell we use CET in combination with cryo-focused ion beam milling to cut windows into thicker parts of the cell. In collaboration with the Kile lab, we were the first to show herniation of the inner mitochondrial membrane (green) through an apoptotic pore in the outer membrane (red) in apoptotic cells. We will use high resolution imaging to investigate how macromolecules such as ATP synthases (yellow) in the crystae membrane (blue) are undergoing changes during apoptosis.

Cryo-electron Tomography (CET) allows for the highest resolution cellular imaging achievable.
In collaboration with the Kile Lab, we were the first to show herniation of the inner mitochondrial
membrane (green) through an apoptotic pore in the outer membrane (red) in apoptotic cells.

Correlative light and electron microscopy of autophagy

Our lab is applying and developing new imaging tools such as cryo-correlative light and electron microscopy to combine state of the art optical and electron microscopy techniques. The project will apply these high-resolution techniques to study the spatio-temporal regulation of intracellular organelle traffic in autophagy.

Molecular Imaging of key metabolic signalling nodes

We use cryo-EM to determine molecular structures of key molecules involved in the metabolic regulation of cells. While structural cryo-EM is traditionally being used to solve molecules larger than 100kDa, we will apply recent advances that allow for high resolution imaging of smaller molecules.

Visit Associate Professor Ramm's Monash research profile to see a full listing of current projects.

Research activities

Key interests are:

  • Cell signalling
  • Cellular trafficking
  • Correlative microscopy
  • Cryo em
  • Tomography
  • Autophagy
  • Mitophagy
  • Mitochondria
  • Cancer
  • Diabetes

Techniques/expertise

  • Cryo electron microscopy
  • Cryo tomography
  • Single particle cryo EM
  • Correlative light and electron microscopy
  • Super resolution microscopy


Collaborations

We collaborate with many scientists and research organisations around the world. Click on the map to see the details for each of these collaborators (dive into specific publications and outputs by clicking on the dots).


Student research projects

The Ramm Lab offers a variety of Honours, Masters and PhD projects for students interested in joining our group. There are also a number of short term research opportunities available.

Please visit Supervisor Connect to explore the projects currently available in our Lab.