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Become a GP co-investigator

Interested in becoming involved with the worlds largest statin trial in the elderly population and earning some easy CPD points? Register your interest with the STAREE Study today!

Information for GPs

Why become a GP Co-Investigator in the STAREE study?

How do I become a GP co-investigator?

What does a GP co-investigator have to do?

Is there a CPD program available for GP co-investigators?

What do we know about statins for primary prevention in older adults?

Why was atorvastatin chosen for the STAREE study?


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Why become a GP Co-Investigator in the STAREE study?

  • It is an opportunity to become involved in the largest trial of statins to be conducted in the older population, and one that will address important questions regarding statin use by those aged 70 years and over.
  • Administrative reimbursement of $100 will be made to your practice for each randomised participant you recruit.
  • RACGP and ACRRM CPD points available.
  • The trial is coordinated by Monash University and other prestigious universities around Australia.

How do I become a GP co-investigator?

If you are interested in becoming involved with the STAREE study, please register your interest here and one of our GP liaisons will be in contact with you shortly.

What does a GP co-investigator have to do?

Involvement for GP co-investigators in the STAREE study is minimal as research staff will conduct recruitment activities and study visits. GPs will be asked to:

  • Sign a registration form which states the GP-coinvestigator roles and responsibilities
  • Briefly review a list of potentially suitable patients each year
  • Review and confirm eligibility of patients pre-randomisation
  • Continue to provide usual ongoing patient care

Is there a CPD program available for GP co-investigators?

Medical practitioners have the opportunity to use their participation in the STAREE clinical trial to gain RACGP CPD or ACRRM PDP points over the course of the 2020-22 triennium.

GP co-investigators who register for CPD activity points (previously category 2 points) are awarded up to 30 point s for study related activities   (30 points equates to 15 hours of self-directed involvement) which include baseline screening of potential participants. The trial can also be used as a self-directed CPD accredited activity (previously category 1 activity). GP co-investigators must submit an online application form at racgp.org.au/education/professional-development/qi-cpd/self-directed-learning.

The form will require you to list all your supporting activities of the STAREE clinical trial including participation in reinforcing activities such as further research or development of the trial.

GP co-investigators can also claim a flat rate of 7 ACRRM PDP hours for study related activities such as baseline screening of potential participants, baseline consultations and consultations related to possible study medication related adverse events.

GPs need to email staree@monash.edu with their ACRRM member number and STAREE will log on to the ACRRM website and submit 7 hours of PDP activities.

If you require further information please contact:

STAREE office (Telephone: 1800 770 664; Email: staree@monash.edu)

RACGP (Telephone: 1800 331 626; Email: racgp@racgp.org.au)

ACRRM (Telephone: 1800 223 226; Email: pdp@acrrm.org.au)

What do we know about statins for primary prevention in older adults?

Data from randomised controlled trials (RCTs) about the benefits and risks of statins for primary prevention for adults older than 70 years are limited, as relatively few older adults have participated in trials to date. PROSPER, the only RCT to specifically study statin use in older adults, combined both primary and secondary prevention populations. STAREE therefore addresses a critical knowledge gap and aims to provide the evidence to support practice guidelines for primary prevention in a large community-based sample of people over 70 years of age.

Why was atorvastatin chosen for the STAREE study?

Atorvastatin was chosen as it:

  • Is the most commonly prescribed statin in Australia,
  • At low to moderate dosing (20-40mg) has a favourable side effect profile
  • Is one of the most potent treatments in reducing LDL-C