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Samuel Laboratory

Fibrosis

Welcome to the Samuel Lab

The Lab focuses on the anti-fibrotic actions of various peptide, stem cell and combination therapies for treating the scarring that develops from a failed wound-healing response to tissue injury, and which is a key contributor to tissue dysfunction and failure.

We're part of the Monash Biomedicine Discovery Institute, and a member of the Cardiovascular Disease Program and the Department of Pharmacology.

Associate Professor Chrishan Samuel

My global research connections, partners and funding can be viewed on my Monash Research Profile.

If you are a student interested in doing research in our lab, visit Supervisor Connect.

Click the links below to connect with me on LinkedIn, ORCID and Google Scholar.

Our research

Fibrosis is defined as the hardening and/or scarring of various organs including the heart, kidney and lung; and occurs when injured organs fail to repair properly. Abnormal wound healing can lead to an excessive deposition of extracellular matrix components, primarily collagen. The eventual replacement of normal tissue with scar tissue leads to organ stiffness and ultimately, organ failure. Despite this, current therapies mainly offer symptomatic relief with no effective and safe cures available. Hence, we are working towards developing and characterising novel and more direct anti-fibrotic therapies.

Lab members

We are committed to excellence in research.

Front Row: WeiYi (Vivian) Mao, Anita Pinar, Assoc Prof Chrishan Samuel, Tracey Gaspari, Padma Murthi, Yifang (Tiffany) Li
Back Row: Matthew Shen, Felipe Tapia-Caceres, Edward Low, Sadman Bhuiyan, Gang She, Ziqiao (Roy) Wang, Nisal Vidanapathirana

Publications

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News

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Join Our Lab

We're always interested in collaborating with bright and motivated researchers, clinicians and industry. Whether you want to research, study or partner with us to accelerate our discoveries, find out about the work we do.

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