2019 Brain Awareness Week

Public Lecture, Thursday 14th March

This year Monash University's Department of Neuroscience, MAPrc (Monash Alfred Psychiatry research centre) and The Alfred Hospital will be hosting a public lecture to celebrate Brain Awareness Week, a global campaign to increase public awareness of the progress and benefits of brain research. The lecture will feature two speakers, Dr Caroline Gurvich and Associate Professor Joanne Fielding.

  • Date: Thursday 14 March 2019
  • Time: 2.00pm -  3.00pm, lecture will be followed by networking and refreshments.
  • Venue: Alfred Research Alliance Lecture Theatre (formerly known as AMREP lecture theatre) is adjacent to the Baker Institute at 75 Commercial Road, Melbourne 3004, 200 metres east of the main Alfred Hospital entrance.
  • Cost: Free
  • RSVP: Link
  • Enquiries: Loretta Piccenna | T:  +61 3 9903 0879 I E: loretta.piccenna@monash.edu

Speakers

Dr Caroline Gurvich -

"Sex hormones and cognition in mental health and mental illness"

Caroline is a Senior Research Fellow and a Clinical Neuropsychologist. She is the Deputy Director of the Women’s Mental Health Division at Monash Alfred Psychiatry research centre and Head of the Cognitive Neuroscience Group. Caroline’s research aims to better understand biological and lifestyle contributors to cognitive health and cognitive dysfunction across a range of disorders in psychiatry.  She is particularly interested in hormonal and genetic influences on cognition and their interactions with psychological and lifestyle factors, such as stress and early life trauma.  Caroline combines neuropsychological assessments with eye movement research to clearly characterise cognition.  She works across a range of disorders including schizophrenia, complex trauma disorders, perimenopausal depression and Alzheimer's disease with a focus on women's mental health.

Associate Professor Joanne Fielding -

"Visual Snow: what we know and don't know"

Associate Professor Joanne Fielding is a senior research fellow and the head of the Ocular Motor Research Unit within the Department of Neuroscience at Monash University. Joanne’s research entails an investigation of the ocular motor system as a means of developing an understanding of neurocognitive processes fundamental to normal human behaviour, and how these processes may be, or become, dysfunctional. Combining a range of sophisticated approaches such as MRI in combination with ocular motor assessment, her work explores a range of neurological disorders that result in isolated regions of pathology and/or disseminated damage to neural networks. Specifically, Joanne has investigated diseases including, but not limited to, Parkinson’s disease, Huntington’s disease, Multiple Sclerosis, Autism spectrum disorder, sports-related concussion and most recently visual snow.