Korean Studies Research Session for Teaching and Technology

Every year Monash University Korean Studies holds a Research Session on teaching and technology. This is an afternoon of discussion about teaching and learning organised by Monash University Korean Studies. It is open to all Monash Korean language teachers. The aim is to exchange ideas about content, language teaching, and the use of technology in the classroom. Teachers are encouraged to exchange ideas about different materials or activities they have used in their lectures/workshops/tutorials or different ways of evaluating learners in language courses. The aim is to introduce new ideas and methods into our teaching of the Korean language and improve the learning experience of our students.

2022 Report

On Tuesday, 7th June from 11am to 5pm, Monash University Korean Studies Research Hub held the third Korean Studies Research Session for Teaching and Technology, where educators from around Australia came together to present their experiences, ideas or techniques for online language teaching. For the first time, the event was held in hybrid format, with guests joining both in person and online via Zoom. The presentations were followed by a round-table discussion, and included opportunities for on-site participants to connect and share ideas.

You can watch some of the presentations in the playlist below:

(The above playlist contains: 'Korean-as-a-foreign-language teaching and learning in Vietnam', 'The language classroom in the metaverse: Gather town for fun and game-like Korean language learning', 'Beyond the classroom - enriching engagement' and 'The Use of the Online Language Exchange Program for a University Korean Language Course', in this order.)

Dr Nicola Fraschini (UWA) has also kindly shared the slides for his presentation 'KeyKorea: An online app to improve Korean language learner typing skills Presenter: Dr Nicola Fraschini', which can be viewed here.

Session 1: Online learning tools

Chair: Danae Smith

11:10am - 11:40m

KeyKorea: An online app to improve Korean language learner typing skills Presenter: Dr Nicola Fraschini
In the past few years, the transition from the physical class to a fully digital learning space forced educators to rethink traditional approaches to teaching Korean language skills. In this context, the need to anticipate the move from handwriting to typing in beginner level learners was felt because of the increased frequency of online testing and the capillary diffusion of personal digital devices used for learning. This presentation focuses on an online application called KeyKorea, designed at the University of Western Australia to support the development of Korean learners' typing and writing skills. Starting by illustrating the background and rationale of this online application, this presentation will show its main features and discuss insights gained from observing users' statistics related to typing accuracy and speed rates

11:40am - 12:10pm

The language classroom in the metaverse: Gather town for fun and game-like Korean language learning
Presenter: Ms Hyunmi Kim
In response to the Covid-19 pandemic, the environment of teaching and learning shifted dramatically towards online platforms. However, most video conferencing platforms cause excessive fatigue from protracted use and have limitations in fostering interaction among students, and between students and language material. This presentation aims to illustrate the introduction of Gather town, a metaverse platform, into the Korean language classroom. Gather town can be used to foster interaction among learners by creating a more interactive communicative environment and enhancing classroom engagement. This presentation will discuss the main strengths of a metaverse environment applied to the language classroom and its limitations.

Keynote presentation

1:00pm - 1:40pm

Korean-as-a-foreign-language teaching and learning in Vietnam*
Presenters: Nguyen Thi Hong Nhat and Seonkyeong Kim
In the globalized world, competence in foreign languages has become necessary skills for citizens to integrate internationally. To prepare generations for this world, the Vietnamese government has been implementing policies to introduce foreign languages, including Korean, into learning programs at different educational levels. This presentation provides insights into the practice of learning and teaching Korean as Korean-as-a-second-language in the context of Vietnam, a country in South-East Asia. The study collected data from a questionnaire with 200 students and interviews with 3 lecturers of a Korean language program at a university in the North of Vietnam. The findings, while preliminary, suggests the general opportunities and difficulties to teach and learn the Korean language in Vietnam. The findings have important implications for developing other programs in similar contexts.

Session 2: Hybrid classrooms

Chair: Danae Smith

1:40pm - 2:10pm

Beyond the classroom - enriching engagement
Presenter: Ingrid D’Souza
As Higher Education begins to accept the post-pandemic shift into new teaching and learning spaces, educators will be challenged to adapt, prepare and change their steadfast practices while embracing this new paradigm. One such change in practice is the hybrid model of teaching, where success is dependent on preparation and knowledge about technologies which can support student-centred learning and engagement in the new 21st-century classroom. This presentation will introduce participants to various teaching and learning approaches that enrich and engage students in their learning - both within and outside the classroom space. The session will provide opportunities to consider interactive techniques that foster a sense of engagement with learning regardless of the delivery mode.

2:10pm - 2:40pm

The use of an e-portfolio project in a Korean language classroom
Presenter: Dr Mi Yung Park
This presentation showcases a semester-long e-portfolio project in a third-year Korean language classroom in a New Zealand university setting, including its design, implementation, and evaluation. The use of e-portfolios in the language classroom has been shown to be an effective means for developing students’ language skills, cultural literacy, and communicative competence. This presentation explores benefits and challenges that the instructor and students experienced in the process of engaging in the project, as well as related assessment practices. It concludes with suggestions for developing and implementing e-portfolio projects for Korean language learners in similar contexts.

3:00pm - 3:30pm

The Use of the Online Language Exchange Program for a University Korean Language Course
Presenter: Dr Eun Seon Kim and Ms Jeong Yoon Ku
Not all who learn foreign languages can afford opportunities to communicate with native speakers through university exchange programs or international travels. This presentation suggests a way to offer regular online language exchange sessions where learners can practice their study language and gain intercultural experience in relation to the content of their language course. The case study is based on the 2022 joint operation of the Australian National University’s Korean language program and the FLIP group in Korea. Drawing from the survey results of the participants of this 12-week pilot project, this presentation evaluates the efficiency of the operating system.

Presenter biographies

Session 1: Online learning tools

KeyKorea: An online app to improve Korean language learner typing skills
Nicola Fraschini (PhD Korea University) is lecturer in Korean Studies at the University of Western Australia. His research focuses on emotions and motivation in foreign language learning and Q methodology, and has been published in journals such as the Modern Language Journal and Foreign Language Annals. Together with Hyunmi Kim, he is co-author of a two-volume textbook for beginner university learners of Korean, forthcoming by Hawoo Publishing in late 2022.

The language classroom in the metaverse: Gather town for fun and game-like Korean language learning
Hyunmi Kim obtained her M.A. in Korean Studies from Ewha Womans University. Currently, she is Associate Lecturer at the University of Western Australia, where she teaches second level Korean language courses. She received a UWA Faculty Awards for Teaching Excellence and a UWA Citations for Outstanding Contributions to Student Learning.

Keynote presentation
Nguyen Thi Hong Nhat
is the Dean of Faculty of English, a teacher educator and a lecturer of English at Hanoi Pedagogical University 2, Vietnam. She holds a Doctor degree from the University of Queensland. She has received several scholarships from Vietnamese, Australian and the US government scholarships to complete her higher education study and other professional development courses. Her research interest is in the teaching of listening as a foreign language skill, EFL materials development, textbooks, curriculum development, teacher education, and Computer-Assisted Language Learning.

Seonkyeong Kim is PhD candidate at The University of Queensland and Korean course coordinator at Hanoi Pedagogical University 2. She has been teaching Korean language and culture at The University of Queensland for six years and has three-year teaching Korean experience in South Korea. Her research interests are Korean language teaching and learning, language textbook and text analysis.

Session 2: Hybrid classrooms

Beyond the classroom - enriching engagement
Having worked in the higher education sector for over 17 years, Ingrid D’Souza brings a wealth of knowledge particularly with respect to teaching and learning. Her particular interest extends to how academic staff can be encouraged to adopt educational design principles, and technology to complement their teaching and learning practices.

The use of an e-portfolio project in a Korean language classroom
Dr Mi Yung Park is Senior Lecturer in Korean at the University of Auckland. Her research interests include Korean language pedagogy and language and identity. Her work has appeared in such journals as Language and Education, International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism, Language and Intercultural Communication, Classroom Discourse, and Journal of Pragmatics.

The Use of the Online Language Exchange Program for a University Korean Language Course Eunseon Kim is lecturer and convenor of the Korean Language Program at the Australian National University. She obtained her PhD in Asian Studies from the University of British Columbia. Her research interests include language ideology, the history of linguistic thought, and metalinguistic discourses, with a particular emphasis on Korean linguistic etiquette.

Jeong Yoon Ku is the convenor of Korean language courses for all levels at the Australian National University. She received her master’s degree in Applied Linguistics at ANU. Her research interests include Korean linguistics, second language pragmatics and language assessment. She also teaches professional Korean to diplomats.

2021 Report

On Wednesday 26 May from 2pm to 4pm, Monash University Korean Studies Research Hub held the third Korean Studies Research Session for Teaching and Technology in which speakers from the Australian National University, the University of Western Australia and the University of Queensland were invited to present their ideas about online language teaching. The presentations were followed by a discussion amongst participants. This year, we also made this research session available globally to allow other Korean language teachers working in higher education settings to attend.

Schedule: 

2:00

How to use online blogs to teach the Korean heritage and non-heritage learner mixed class

Dr Nicola Fraschini
(University of Western Australia)
2:20Questions and discussion 
2:40Staying home but learn together: Speaking activities and assessment tasks for remote lower-level language teachingDr Eun Seon Kim
(Australian National University)
3:00Questions and discussion 
3:20

How to teach Korean with digital learning tools and Preparing Teaching Materials for Korean Learners.

Dr. Isaac Lee and Mr Ki Young Choi (University of Queensland)
4:00Questions and discussion 

Please see the recording of the session below:

2020 Report

Following on from the inaugural event in 2019, Monash University Korean Studies held the second Korean Studies Research Session for Teaching and Technology in which speakers from the University of Auckland and the University of Western Australia were invited to present their ideas about online language teaching. The presentations were followed by a discussion amongst participants and the annual Monash University Core University Project members meeting.

The idea is this session will help improve the professional competence of academic and language teaching staff as well as foster a greater team spirit within Korean Studies by encouraging greater collaboration between the academic and language teaching sections. In addition, a primary aim of the session was to discuss challenges in online language teaching. Since sessional teachers of Korean language and Korean language teaching assistants are hourly paid, their participation time was reimbursed out of the AKS Core grant funds.

This event was held on  Wednesday September 16, 2020, 1-3:30pm via ZOOM

2020 Schedule:

1:00-1:20 ‘Enhancing student participation in an online Korean language classroom’  Mi Yung Park (University of Auckland)

1:20-1:40 ‘Maximising Korean oral Production in an Online Environment’ Nicola Fraschini (UWA)

1:40-2:00 ‘Motivating online learners: Netflix, Notability, Classum, and Final Cut in the Korean language class.’  Hyunmi Kim (UWA)

2:00-2:30 Q and A and general brainstorming of ideas about teaching Korean language (and content) units in an online environment

2:30-3:30 AKS Korean Studies Core Meeting

‘Enhancing student participation in an online Korean language classroom’ Mi Yung Park (University of Auckland)

Interaction is essential for developing foreign language skills. The online context of language learning and teaching gives us opportunities to try new ways to interact with students and engage them in the learning process. This presentation will focus on different ways to enhance student participation in an online Korean language classroom. Emphasis will be given to discussing how to promote productive language output through engaging them in authentic and collaborative tasks and activities suitable for intermediate-level students. Facilitating meaningful interaction and helping students build a sense of community is a crucial component of successful online learning.

Mi Yung Park is a Senior Lecturer in Korean Studies at the University of Auckland. Her research interests include Korean language pedagogy, language and identity, and heritage language education. Her work has appeared in such journals as International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism, Language and Intercultural Communication, Classroom Discourse, Journal of Pragmatics, and The Korean Language in America.

‘Maximising Korean oral Production in an Online Environment’ Nicola Fraschini (UWA)

This presentation will introduce firstly the types of speaking activities used in beginner level Korean language classes at UWA, and how these have been adapted to maximise students’ oral production in an online teaching environment. Secondly, it will illustrate how oral testing practices at UWA have been modified due to the limitations imposed by remote teaching, and how oral testing of a large cohort (240+ students) has been conducted effectively online in a relatively short timeframe by a limited number of instructors. Lastly, it will consider the constraints of written online testing for Korean beginner learner and the design of online assessments.

Nicola Fraschini obtained his PhD in Korean language and culture education from Korea University. Before moving to Australia, he taught Korean language at Sogang University Korean Language Education Centre. At present, he is lecturer and Korean Studies major coordinator at the University of Western Australia, where he teaches first and third year Korean language units. His current research interests are motivation and emotions in Korean language learning.

‘Motivating online learners: Netflix, Notability, Classum, and Final Cut in the Korean language class.’ Hyunmi Kim (UWA)

The online learning environment requires students to be more self-efficient, therefore teachers need to apply strategies and adopt tools to foster motivation and promote self-directed learning. By drawing on the experience gathered through adapting to online Korean language classroom and multimedia tools commonly available, this presentation will illustrate how the use of multimedia editing tools, electronic whiteboards, A/V resources, and a dialogic feedback platform increased student engagement with the learning material and satisfaction in online classes, resulting ultimately in an increase in retention numbers in a cohort of 48 second year Korean language learners.Hyunmi Kim obtained her M.A. in Korean Studies from Ewha Womans University, and she is enrolled in the M.A. program in Asian Studies at the University of British Columbia. Currently, she is associate lecturer at the University of Western Australia, where she teaches second level Korean language courses. She received a UWA Faculty Teaching Awards: Excellence in Teaching Excellence and a UWA award for Excellence in Teaching: Citations for Outstanding Contributions to Student Learning.

2019 Report

The first event was held on May 22, 2019; 2-5pm in the Japanese Studies Centre Auditorium.

2019 Schedule:

2:00-2:05 Andy Jackson Introduction

2:05-2:25 Brook Bolander ‘Using polling software in class’ (Link to talk here)

2:25-2:50 Lucien Brown ‘Input and Input Activities’

2:50-3:15 Andy Jackson ‘Harmer’s Communicative Continuum as a tool for planning teaching’

3:15-3:30 Coffee Break

3:30-3:50 Anita Cascone ‘Moodle Information Session’

3:50-4:15 Heekyung Ahn ‘Engaging Activities: for effective Korean language learning’ (in Korean)

4:15-4:35 Beatrice Trefalt ‘Dealing with difficult Students’

4:35-4:55 Jung Sim Kim ‘“Korean Studies Library Guide" as research and learning tool’

4:55-5:00 Feedback

Presenters:

Heekyung Ahn currently teaches Korean Language at Monash University, she previously taught for three semesters at the University of Queensland while she was studying for a master’s degree in Applied Linguistics. She has also worked at Charles Sturt University and the Holmes Institute in Melbourne as an academic advisor and learning management coordinator. Prior to coming to Australia from South Korea in 2012, she spent seven years working in primary schools in Korea

Brook Bolander is Lecturer in Linguistics and has taught at the University of Freiburg and University of Hong Kong. Her main areas of interest are digital discourse and language and transnationalism, and she has contributed to The Journal of Pragmatics, Language in Society and theInternational Journal of the Sociology of Language amongst many others.

Lucien Brown joined Monash in January 2018 as Senior Lecturer in Korean Studies. Prior to this, he was Associate Professor of Korean Linguistics at University of Oregon, USA (2011-2017). He obtained my MA in Korean Studies and PhD in Korean Language Research from SOAS University of London, UK. He is an applied linguist who carries out research in two interrelated fields: politeness research and socio-cultural language learning/teaching.

Anita Cascone is the Learning Systems Administrator for the Faculty of Arts and sits within the Teaching Support team. She has worked with Moodle since it was introduced at Monash in 2011 and will be showcasing some underused yet valuable functions of Moodle.

Andy Jackson is Associate Professor and convenor of the Korean Studies programme at Monash University. He currently researches Korean premodern history and Korean films about the Korean War. He spent fifteen years teaching English as a Foreign Language in South Korea, Japan, Italy, Quebec and the UK.

Jung-Sim Kim is the Korean Studies Librarian at Monash University in Australia who works with researchers, and academics on the effective use of Korea-related resources. Her role is providing research and learning support on Korea at Monash University as well as in Australia.

Beatrice Trefalt is Associate Professor in Japanese Studies, Monash University, Australia. She is the author of Japanese Army Stragglers and Memories of the War in Japan, 1950-1975 (also published by Routledge) and co-author of Japanese War Criminals: The politics of Justice after the Second World War (Columbia University Press, 2017). She is Deputy Head of School for Education in LLCL.