Earth, Atmosphere & Environment

Earth, Atmosphere and Environment

From the red plains of Broken Hill to Antarctica, we study the Earth’s core, its atmosphere and everything in between. A new, hands-on way to explore and learn earth sciences.

Latest news from School of Earth, Atmosphere and Environment

El Niño record

New research produces 400-year El Niño record and reveals astonishing change

Australian scientists have developed an innovative method using cores drilled from coral to produce a world first 400-year long seasonal record of El Niño events, a record that some in the field had described as impossible to extract.

Earth Atmosphere and Environment

New study reveals El Niño is part of an interconnected global web

El-Nino

We always knew that El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) had impacts around the globe, but now an international study involving Monash climate scientists suggests that global interactions also influence ENSO.

Earth Atmosphere and Environment 1 January 2019

Melbourne and Adelaide night temperatures amplified by heatwaves, study finds

As if the daytime heatwave temperatures weren’t bad enough, Melbourne and Adelaide residents will also have to put up with nightly temperatures significantly higher than surrounding rural areas thanks to amplification caused by the ‘urban heat island effect’.

Earth Atmosphere and Environment 1 January 1970

The largest mass extinction of all time began with forest ecosystem collapse, study finds

World-first international research involving a Monash palaeontologist has provided new new insights into what caused the biotic crisis known as  the ‘Mother of all Mass-Extinctions’ or the ‘Great Dying’, in which up to 96% of marine species and 70% of land vertebrate species became extinct.

Earth Atmosphere and Environment 1 January 1970
Warmer ocean temperatures and unusual wind patterns have contributed to a record decline of sea ice levels in Antarctica.

Ocean and wind changes cause Antarctic sea ice drop to record low

Warmer ocean temperatures, combined with unusual wind patterns, contributed to the record decline of sea ice levels in Antarctica, according to new research published in the prestigious international science journal Nature Communications.

Earth Atmosphere and Environment
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