School of Earth, Atmosphere & Environment

Earth, Atmosphere and Environment

From the red plains of Broken Hill to Antarctica, we study the Earth’s core, its atmosphere and everything in between. A new, hands-on way to explore and learn earth sciences.

Latest news from School of Earth, Atmosphere and Environment

Tuburiente volcano

Stressed out volcanoes more likely to collapse and erupt, study finds

An international study led by Monash scientists has discovered how volcanoes experience stress. The study, published today in Scientific Reports, has implications for how the world might be better protected against future volcano collapses.

Earth Atmosphere and Environment

Coastal flooding could occur weekly if greenhouse gas emissions continue, scientists warn

Coastal-flooding

As the Antarctic air hits south eastern Australia with a freak cold snap – scientists warn that coastal flooding in Sydney could occur on a weekly basis, if greenhouse gas emissions continue.

Earth Atmosphere and Environment 5 January 2020

Extreme glacier melt is due to human greenhouse emissions, study finds

An international study involving a Monash climate scientist has revealed a strong link between human greenhouse gas emissions and the increased melting of glaciers.

Earth Atmosphere and Environment

The Australian fires: Understanding the causes and long-term impact of the bushfires.

This episode of A Different Lens looks at the lasting and far-reaching impact of the past summer's devastating Australian bushfires. Monash academics from various disciplines offer insights into what caused the "megafires", how communities and businesses are trying to recover, the environmental devastation, and, where to from here? They also shed light on how climate change played a role in the severity of the bushfires.

Earth Atmosphere and Environment 1 January 1970
White sand

Reef sand dissolving quicker than previously thought, study warns

A new international study led by Monash University climate scientists has found reef sand is dissolving much quicker than previously thought due to the impact of microbes.

Earth Atmosphere and Environment
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