Professor Aibing Yu

Professor Aibing Yu

Vice Chancellor's Professorial Fellow, Pro Vice-Chancellor and President - Suzhou
Department of Chemical Engineering
24 Research Way, Clayton Campus

Professor Aibing Yu specialises in process metallurgy, obtaining BEng in 1982 and MEng in 1985 from Northeastern University, PhD in 1990 from the University of Wollongong, and DSc in 2007 from the University of New South Wales (UNSW). After two years as Postdoc Fellow with CSIRO Division of Mineral and Process Engineering (90-91), he was with UNSW as Lecturer (92-95), Senior Lecturer (95-97), Associate Professor (98-01), Professor (01-14) and Scientia Professor (07-14). In May 2014, he joined Monash University as Vice-Chancellor’s Professorial Fellow, Pro Vice-Chancellor and President of Monash-Southeast University Joint Research Institute (later changed to Monash Suzhou). He has been Inaugural Director of UNSW Centre for Simulation and Modelling of Particulate Systems (01-07), Deputy Director of ARC Centre of Excellence for Functional Nanomaterials (08-10), Founding Director of Australia-China Joint Research Centre for Minerals, Metallurgy and Materials (13-15), and ARC Research Hub for Computational Particle Technology (16-). He has received numerous prestigious awards including UNSW Scientia Professorship, ARC Federation Fellowship, NSW Scientist of the Year, and AAS Ian Wark Medal and Lecture. He is a Fellow of Australian Academy of Science (AAS), Australian Academy of Technological Sciences and Engineering (ATSE), Royal Society of New South Wales (RSNSW), and Institution of Chemical Engineers (IChemE).

Professor Yu is a world-leading scientist in particle/powder technology and process engineering. He has authored/co-authored >900 publications, organised numerous international conferences, attracted ~$75M external funds mainly via various competitive grant schemes (>50 ARC DP/LP/LIEF grants), graduated >30 postdoc fellows, >70 PhD and >20 MEng students, and delivered many plenary/keynote presentations at different international conferences. He is Editor-in-Chief, Handbook of Powder Science and Engineering (2014-), Executive Editor, Powder Technology (2013-) and Particuology (2008-2013), while guest-editing for several journals and on the editorial/advisory boards of about 20 learned journals. Professor Yu was the Inaugural Director of the UNSW multidisciplinary research centre for simulation and modelling of particulate systems (2000-07), Deputy Director of ARC Centre of Excellence for Functional Nanomaterials (2008-10), Founding Director of Australia-China Joint Research Centre for Minerals, Metallurgy and Materials (2013-15) and ARC Industrial Transformation Hub for Computational Particle Technology (2016-). He has also been on the management committee or advisory board of various multidisciplinary research centres at national and university levels, currently chairing the Technical Advisory Committee of Baosteel-Australian Universities Joint R&D Centre (2011). While working in Suzhou, he has also established the Specialised Research Institute for Process Modelling and Optimisation, sponsored by Jiangsu Industrial Technology Research Institute (2016-).

He is a recipient of various prestigious fellowships and awards, including ARC Queen Elizabeth II (1993-97), Australian Professorial (2005-2009) and Federation (2008-12) Fellowships, the Josef Kapitan Ironmaking Award from the Iron and Steel Society, USA (2002), Outstanding Overseas Chinese Scholar Award, China (2003), Ian Wark Medal and Lecture from Australian Academy of Science (2010), ExxonMobil Award from Australian and New Zealand Federation of Chemical Engineers (2010), NSW Scientist of the Year in the category of engineering, mathematics and computer sciences (2010), Distinguished Visiting Fellowship Award from the Royal Academy of Engineering (2011), Top 100 Most Influential Engineers in Australia (2011), Postdoctoral Supervisor of the Year Award from UNSW (2012), and listed in Elsevier Most Cited Researchers in Chemical Engineering (2016). He is a Fellow of Australian Academy of Science (AAS), Australian Academy of Technological Sciences and Engineering (ATSE), Royal Society of New South Wales (RSNSW), and Institution of Chemical Engineers (IChemE). In addition to various roles for different industries, he has served for a number of governmental organisations, e.g. being a Member of the ARC College of Experts (Engineering and Environmental Sciences, 2006-08) and DEST Research Quality Framework (Engineering and Technology, 2007), Panel Member for DIISR International Science Linkage and Endeaviour Scholarships/Fellowships Schemes (2009-2012), and Member, DIISR Research Workforce Strategy – Chemical Sciences Analysis Team (2010). He acted as Honorary Secretary, ATSE NSW Division (2006-2010), and a member of ATSE Assembly/Council in 2008-10; Chair, AAS NSW Region (2013-2014) and Member (and Chair, 2014-15), Sectional Committee – Physical and Engineering Sciences (2013-16). He is President (07-08), Chair of Advisory Board (09-10) and Honorary President (11-), Federation of Chinese Scholars in Australia; a Member, Overseas Expert Advisory Board – Science and Technology, Chinese Government; and a Scientific Advisor to Guanzhou and Beijing Cities.

Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy (PhD), Metallurgical and Materials Engineering., University of Wollongong.
  • Master's Degree, Metallurgical Engineering., Northeastern University (CN).
  • Bachelor's Degree, Metallurgical Engineering., Northeastern University (CN).

Expertise

Particle science and technology.
Process engineering.
Process metallurgy.
Chemical engineering.
Material engineering.
Modelling and simulation.
Multiphase flow.
Powder technology.
Blast furnace.
Nanoparticles and application.

Major professional involvement

Professor Yu has developed research collaboration with various industrial organisations including Bluescope Steel, BHP-Billiton, Alcoa, Xstrata, BMA, ACARP, Johnsons and Johnsons, Minco Technologies, Cement Australia, Rio Tinto, Weir Minerals and many overseas R&D organizations such as Kawasaki Steel (Japan), China Steel (Taiwan), POSCO (South Korea), Tata Steel (India), BaoSteel, Longking and JITRI (China).

Research Interests

Aibing Yu’s Research interests are in the following areas,

  • Powder/particle technology.
  • Particle characterization and data interpretation.
  • Particle packing characteristics and porosity prediction.
  • Particle-structure-property relations.
  • Nano-particles and application.
  • Solids flow and segregation.
  • Fluid flow, heat and mass transfer in packed and fluidised beds.
  • Processing and handling of bulk/particulate materials.
  • Simulation of particulate systems.
  • Inter-facial engineering in multi-phase processes.
  • Physical and mathematical modelling of particulate and multiphase processes.
  • Industrial application.

Research Projects

Current projects

Model studies of three-dimensional distributions within blast furnaces for reliable and efficient operations.

ARC Research Hub for nanoscience based construction material manufacturing.

The research Hub will develop novel construction materials including binders, cement additives, high performance concrete materials, concrete structural systems, polymer composites, and pavement materials. The multidisciplinary Hub provides a centralised platform to transform construction materials industry into an advanced manufacturing sector delivering sustainable and resilient infrastructure assets. The Hub will deeply drive advances in nanotechnology, cement chemistry, concrete technology and develop extreme engineering solutions. The Hub will train the next generation of skilled workforce, re-positioning Australian industry competitiveness and global market leadership to capture international infrastructure development opportunities.

Development and application of a virtue experimental blast furnace.

This project aims to develop a virtue experimental blast furnace based on advanced discrete particle simulation technique. The model furnace will be used to study the flow and thermochemical behaviour in ironmaking, quantify the effects of key variables related to raw material and operational conditions, and formulate strategies for optimum process design and control under different conditions. The findings will be very useful to comprehensively assess the performance of Australian minerals in ironmaking, improve the energy efficiency and reduce CO2 emission in the steel industry, and enhance the competitiveness of Australian economy.

Particle-scale modelling of particle-fluid flows in gas and oil extraction.

This project aims to develop a particle scale model to describe the complex particle-fluid flow and erosion of pipeline transport in gas and oil extraction, quantify the effects of key variables, formulate strategies for optimum process control under different conditions. This will be achieved by means of a combined theoretical and experimental program, involving the use of the state-of-the-art discrete element modelling and simulation techniques. The research outcomes, such as theories, models and knowledge, should be useful for the process control of pipeline transport in the petroleum and energy-related industries which are of vital importance to Australia.

Model studies of new iron making processes.

This project aims to study the fundamentals governing the multiphase flow and thermochemical performance in representative new ironmaking processes, and formulate some useful strategies for the design, control
and optimisation of next generation of ironmaking technology which is useful to Australia’s future mineral and steel industries.

Micromechanic modelling and analysis of the dynamics of non-spherical particles coupled with fluid flow.

Particulate processes are widely used but rarely reach more than 60% of design capacity. This project aims to tackle this problem focusing on non-spherical particles. Research outcomes will be useful to the design, control and optimisation of industrial processes of vital importance to Australia’s energy-related industries.

ARC Research Hub for Computational Particle Technology.

This research hub represents a significant research into particle science and technology. It aims to develop and apply advanced theories and mathematical models to design and optimise particulate and multiphase processes that are widely used in the minerals and metallurgical industries. This will be achieved through detailed analysis of the fundamentals governing the fluid flow, heat and mass transfer at different time and length scales, facilitated by various novel research techniques. Research outcomes including theories, computer models and simulation techniques, as well as well-trained young researchers, will generate a significant impact across a range of industries of vital importance to Australia’s economic and technological future.

Past projects

Development and Application of VO2-based Advanced Nanomaterials for Smart Window Coatings.

This project aims to develop innovative strategies for the synthesis and thin film coating of vanadium dioxide nanoparticles, and understand the fundamentals through a comprehensive experimental and theoretical
program. The findings will then be directly used in developing smart windows that have many applications in various industries and can lead to huge benefits in energy and environment. This project therefore represents an outstanding opportunity to develop and apply advanced knowledge to solve significant practical problems. Its success can significantly expand the knowledge creativity and research capability of Australia, and add value to its rich resource of vanadium oxides in advanced material manufacturing.

Simulation of flow and heat transfer in iron ore reduction kiln with DEM-CFD coupling.

Fundamental studies of multiphase flow and separation performance of natural medium cyclones for recovering waste coal.

Natural medium cyclones (NMCs) are increasingly used for recovering waste coal but experience difficulty in process scale-up, control and optimisation. This project will investigate the fundamentals governing the complex multiphase flow and performance by a combined theoretical and experimental program. Its aim is to develop and validate computer models that can describe the complicated physics and performance of this complicated flow system under different operational, geometry and material conditions. Project outcomes will be used in developing better design and control strategies of NMC processes which are useful for environmental protection and energy efficiency, leading to an improved competitiveness of Australia’s coal industry.

Particle scale and analysis of the multiphase flows in coal preparation.

All run-of-mine coal must go through coal preparation before transporting to market. This project will investigate the fundamentals governing the complex multiphase flow and performance of key processes in coal preparation by a combined theoretical and experimental program. Its aim is to develop and validate computer models that can describe the flow and performance under different operational, geometry and material conditions. Project outcomes will be used in developing better design and control strategies of the processes in coal preparation, resulting in an improved competitiveness of Australia’s coal industry.

Numerical and experimental studies of the gas-particle flow and dust collection in electrostatic precipitation system.

This project aims to understand and model the complicated gas-solid flow and dust collection in an ElectroStatic Precipitator (ESP). It will be acheived by mean of advanced computational approaches at different time and length scales through a combined theoretical and experimental program. Project completion will significantly promote the capability of simulating gas-solid flow in compex systems. The outcomes can lead to better design and control of ESP systems which are widely used in many industries such as power generation and mineral/chemical processing

Fundamental investigation of the briquetting behaviour of iron ore fines.

Australia is the world’s largest iron ore exporter. This project aims to understand and model the packing and compaction in briquetting ore fines. It will be achieved through a combined experimental and numerical approach. Project completion will significantly promote the capability of modelling iron ore packing and compaction process. Its outcomes can lead to better design and control of the briquetting process which is widely used in the mineral industry.

Multiscale modelling of the transport phenomena of liquid iron and slag in ironmaking blast furnace.

This project will investigate the fundamentals governing the complex gas-powder-liquid-solid flow and thermochemical processes in an ironmaking blast furnace by a combined theoretical and experimental program. It focuses on the generation and in particular, transport phenomena of liquid iron and slag within and below the cohesive zone in the furnace and aims to develop, based on the parallel studies at different blast furnace under different conditions. It will provide a basis for developing better control strategies and extending furnace campaign life, leading to the improved competitiveness of the Australia’s steel industry.

Discrete particle modelling and analysis of complex particle-fluid flows.

Multiphase processes are widely used in both conventional and modern industries in Australia and worldwide, however rarely reach more than 60% of design capacity because of a poor understanding of their fundamental characteristics. This project aims to overcome this problem by using an extensive combined fundamental and applied approach. The resulting theories, computer models and simulation techniques will be applied to improve process design, control and optimisation. Consequently, productivity and Australian competitiveness will be significantly enhanced in its most important industries such as minerals, metallurgical, chemical, energy and materials.

Research articles, papers & publications.

See Aibing Yu’s research contributions through published book chapters, articles, journal papers and in the media.

Last modified: October 30, 2018