Dr. Hsin-Hui Shen

Dr. Hsin-Hui Shen

NHMRC Career Development Fellow
Department of Materials Science and Engineering
Room 306, 20 Research Way, Clayton

Dr. Shen is an NHMRC Career Development Fellow at Monash University. She completed her PhD in Physical Chemistry at Oxford University in 2008. Following that, she commenced her postdoctoral research at CSIRO (2008-2011) and received the ARC Super Science Research Fellowship at Monash University (2012-2015). She is a biophysical scientist who can transit between two diverse worlds of biophysics and microbial infections with ease. This is evidenced by her joint appointment with the Biomedicine Discovery Institute, the Department of  Biochemistry and Molecular Biology and Faculty of Engineering, the Department of Materials Science and Engineering in Monash University.

Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy (PhD), Chemistry, University of Oxford
  • MSc. Chemistry, National Taiwan University
  • BSc. Chemistry, National Dong Hwa University

Expertise

Biomaterials
Drug Delivery
Neutron scatterings
Antibiotics

Research Interests

Dr. Hsin-Hui Shen interests are in the following areas,

  • Interaction of polymyxins with bacterial membranes;
  • Synergistic effects of antibiotics against gram-positive bacteria;
  • Design and development of new nanoparticles;
  • Ocular drug delivery ;
  • Detection for glaucoma;
  • Novel therapeutic strategies for protecting the heart from ischaemic heart disease
  • Applications of advanced neutron scattering techniques.

Research Projects

Current projects

New insights in treatment and diagnosis of glaucoma

Past projects

Interaction of daptomycin with reconstituted Staphylococcus aureus membranes -- why is S. aureus becoming resistant to daptomycin?

The rise in antibiotic resistance represents one of the greatest threats to human health, with international organisations and governments calling for urgent action to tackle the crisis. Dominating the list of ‘red-alert’ pathogens is methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), which has now achieved pandemic proportions. As one of the most notorious human pathogens, S. aureus has an intrinsic arsenal of virulence determinants that contribute to a wide spectrum of severe disease, which is compounded by its uncanny ability to adapt to antibiotic and host immune selection pressure, promoting bacterial survival, persistence and therapeutic failure. Reliance on ‘last-line’ anti-staphylococcal agents such as daptomycin has risen dramatically in recent years.

Synergistic Antibacterial Effect of Nanoparticles Combined with Antibiotics on Staphylococcus aureus

The rise in antibiotic resistance represents one of the greatest threats to human health, with international organisations and governments calling for urgent action to tackle the crisis. Dominating the list of ‘red-alert’ pathogens is methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) (MRSA)1, which has now achieved pandemic proportions. As one of the most notorious human pathogens, S. aureus has an intrinsic arsenal of virulence determinants that contribute to a wide spectrum of severe disease, which is compounded by its uncanny ability to adapt to antibiotic and host immune selection pressure, promoting bacterial survival, persistence and therapeutic failure. Reliance on ‘last-line’ antistaphylococcal agents such as daptomycin has risen dramatically in recent years.

Interaction of daptomycin with reconstituted Staphylococcus aureus membranes - why is S. aureus becoming resistant to daptomycin?

The rise in antibiotic resistance represents one of the greatest threats to human health, with international organisations and governments calling for urgent action to tackle the crisis. Dominating the list of ‘red-alert’ pathogens is methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), which has now achieved pandemic proportions. As one of the most notorious human pathogens, S. aureus has an intrinsic arsenal of virulence determinants that contribute to a wide spectrum of severe disease, which is compounded by its uncanny ability to adapt to antibiotic and host immune selection pressure, promoting bacterial survival, persistence and therapeutic failure. Reliance on ‘last-line’ anti-staphylococcal agents such as daptomycin has risen dramatically in recent years.

The effect of lipid A structure on the polymyxins activity

Antibacterial resistance in microbial pathogens has been identified as one of the three greatest threats to human health by the World Health Organization. Indeed, some multi-drug resistant (MDR) strains are resistant to almost all currently available antibiotics, leaving very limited choices for antimicrobial clinical therapy. It is unfortunate that no new antibiotics will be available against
these “superbugs” in the near future due to the dry antibiotic discovery pipeline. With a marked decline in the discovery of novel antimicrobials, and a remarkable increase of antibiotic resistance, our world is now facing an enormous and growing threat from the emergence of MDR bacterial pathogens 1-3. It is notable that although infections with Gram-negative pathogens are resistant to almost all available antibiotics, polymyxins (i.e. polymyxin B and colistin, also known as polymyxin E) are increasingly being used as the last-line therapy 1. The interaction of polymyxins B with three types of lipid A will be investigated using neutron reflectometry and the effect of divalent ions such as Mg2+ and Ca2+ will also be studied.

Design and fabrication of molecular machines: the nanomachines of the future

Research articles, papers & publications

See Hsin-Hui’s research contributions through published book chapters, articles, journal papers and in the media.

Last modified: January 12, 2018