Professor Mark Thompson

Professor Mark Thompson

Professor
Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering
Room 127, 17 College Walk (Building 31), Clayton Campus

Prof. Mark Thompson is Professor in Department of Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering Monash University. His Research areas are, Biological Fluid Dynamics, Computational Fluid Dynamics, Industrial Flows, Bluff Body Flows, Wakes, Fluid-Structure Interaction, Flow Instabilities, Flow Induced Vibration, Aeroacoustics and Aerodynamics. He is been Consulting and has had Previous industrial work with AMIRA, CRA, COMALCO and Ford Europe.

Qualifications

  • Ph.D, Monash University.

Research Projects

Not started projects

The Control of Flow-induced Noise

Current projects

Flow Measurement Facility for Large-Scale Industrial Aerodynamics

Using advanced laser-based particle imaging velocimetry the flow measurement system for large-scale industrial aerodynamics will provide researchers with a powerful tool for resolving high speed and large scale industrial flows. The primary objective of the system, housed at Australia’s largest aerodynamic facility, will be the characterization of complex, three dimensional turbulent flows, which are not yet well understood. The project aims to advance the state of knowledge of the unsteady aerodynamic wakes of cars, trucks, athletes, turbines and micro-air vehicles. If successful the research will reduce aerodynamic drag in transport and improve wind power generation, ultimately improving efficiency and reducing emissions.

Wake Transitions and Fluid-Structure Interactions of Rotating Bluff Bodies

Flow induced vibrations of bluff bodies can lead to severe damage in many applications, such as off-shore
marine structures and tethered bodies. Rotation of bluff bodies can result in huge increases in lift forces, which may promote these vibrations, whereas a nearby free surface may stabilize the vibrations. This proposal aims to discover the mechanisms underpinning the apparently opposing effects of vibration and free surface, individually and jointly, and the excitation of two- and three-dimensional instabilities in the
wakes of two generic bluff bodies: the cylinder and the sphere. The outcomes will be the discovery of new modes of body vibration, wake transitions and means to control fluid-structure interactions.

Dynamics of Fluid Circulation in Industrial Flows

Past projects

Dynamics of Bluff Body Interactions with Walls

Many important processes in industry, environment and sports involve the motion of bluff bodies near surfaces. The understanding and control of these processes has significance for a range of processes including improved mixing, heat transfer, vortex induced vibration, and drag reduction. This project will apply advanced computational and experimental techniques to understand the joint effects of rotation and surface proximity on the motion and wake structures of spherical bodies across a wide range of velocities. The results will underpin better understanding of flows at the microscopic level, such as blood cells, to the macroscopic, such as particles in mixing vessels.

Engineering a Novel Bioreactor and Cell Sorter for Pluripotent Stem Cell Culture

Investigation of the fluid dynamics controlling the heat transfer and base drag on long flat plates using visualisation and animation technique

Renewable energy generation from flow-induced vibration

The project will study how to amplify structural vibration caused by tidal or river flows. This vibration can then
be used to generate energy, similar to the way the energy is generated when wind turns the blades of a
turbine.
Technology based on this research could be applied in situations where traditional methods, like turbines,
are unsuitable, because vibration technologies do not have fast spinning blades that pose a risk to marine
life. They can also be used in shallow and deep, fast and slow flowing water, thereby extracting energy where
it has not previously been feasible.
The research will lead to a deeper understanding flow-induced vibration, and of how to amplify it, so that
energy generation efficiency is maximized.

Stability and Transition in Swirling Flow

Fluid mechanics and physiology of blockages in vascular systems

The program will investigate the associated fluid dynamics of laminar flows through partially obstructed paths, a condition symptomatic of a range of pathologies: thrombosis, stenosis, sclerosis. The flow behavior downstream of a blockage will be visualized and quantitatively measured across a range of relevant parameters, such as Reynolds number, blockage size and shape. It is expected this project will establish a fundamental understanding of the flow behavior, upon which complexities, such as distensible walls and pulsatile flows, can be added and analysed. In addition, a mathematical model of vascular systems will be constructed to predict the effects of blockages and distensibility on the flow rates throughout the entire network.

The development of active third-generation heavy vehicle aerodynamic drag reducing devices to reduce future transport emissions.

This project will investigate an active approach to the aerodynamics of heavy vehicle trailers with the aim of reducing future heavy vehicle related aerodynamic losses. Computational, flow visualization, scale model wind tunnel and on-road aerodynamic research methods will be correlated to gain a greater understanding of the interaction between active devices and bluff-body wakes. The work brings together the unique experimental facilities and computational expertise at Monash University in with the on-road and practical resources of Australian trailer manufacturer Maxitrans. The work provides real potential of reducing aerodynamic drag and consequently the road transport emissions of the future heavy vehicle.

This project will investigate an active approach to the aerodynamics of heavy vehicle trailers with the aim of reducing future heavy vehicle related aerodynamic losses. Computational, flow visualization, scale model wind tunnel and on-road aerodynamic research methods will be correlated to gain a greater understanding of the interaction between active devices and bluff-body wakes. The work brings together the unique experimental facilities and computational expertise at Monash University in with the on-road and practical resources of Australian trailer manufacturer Maxitrans. The work provides real potential of reducing aerodynamic drag and consequently the road transport emissions of the future heavy vehicle.

Engineering Imaging and Supercomputer Prediction of Biofluid Flows

Many of the recent advances in super-computational power and techniques, optical imaging and Synchrotron availability and techniques, mean that implementation of novel engineering concepts to biomedical engineering, in particular relating to the major health problems of hypertension, cardiovascular, pulmonary and renal disease, are only now becoming feasible. The project will develop novel tools and techniques in laser optical and X-ray synchrotron fluids imaging and in super computing prediction, and apply these tools and techniques to a range of important bio fluid flows, such as vascular and lung flows, to discover new mechanisms underpinning major biomedical problems.

Development of Parallel Large Eddy Simultation Software With Applications to Automobile Aerodynamics

Biomedical Engineering Sensing and Imaging Facility

A major facility in biomedical engineering sensing and imaging is proposed. It will foster multi discipline teams of medical and engineering researchers to develop innovative processes and technology for the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of disease, for patient rehabilitation, and for improving health. The new facility will build on a number of existing research strengths and resources across the participating universities as well as the CSIRO and hospital-based research groups.

Tethered Bodies in Fluid Flow

Fluid mechanical and biological studies of a stem cell bioreactor

This interdisciplinary project combines bio engineering (computational and experimental fluid mechanics) and biomedical science approaches to investigate novel bioreactor designs for applications in stem cell biology. Bioreactors are increasingly being utilized for specific applications in this and other laboratory-based areas of cell and tissue production where existing technologies are inadequate or sub optimal. Applications of bioreactors in stem cell biology include large-scale propagation of embryonic stem cells, amplification of rare adult forms of stem cell and mechanical entertainment of tissues in three dimensional constructs.

Fluid Dynamics Software for Undergraduate and Postgraduate Programs

Joint Facility for the Control of Flow-Induced Noise

A joint facility for the study of flow-induced sound is proposed. The problem of noise costs industry billions of dollars each year; a significant proportion of noise problems are generated by fluid flow, such as fan and turbine noise.

Materials and Surface Characterisation Facility

The proposed Facility will include state-of-the-art optical methods and analytical instruments and will underpin Victoria’s growth in the emerging areas of nanotechnology, biotechnology and materials science. It will provide a focus for the development world’s best practice in the characterization of advanced materials and will meet the needs of internationally acclaimed researchers at Melbourne University, Monash University, and RMIT. The Facility, which will expand the Center for Nano science and Nan technology/Bio21Institute Microscopy Facility, will be structured along an open access, multi-user model, and will enhance collaboration between academia and industry.

A National Biomedical Electron Paramagnetic Resonance and Molecular Imaging Centre

Metalloproteins, metals ions and free radicals are involved in the fundamental processes of ageing, vascular and neurodegeneration, chronic inflammation and cancer. By establishing and applying the full frequency spectrum of new electron para magnetic resonance (EPR) technology we will identify, structurally and functionally characterize metalloproteins, metal ions and free radicals in vivo. We have formed an interdisciplinary team incorporating Australian EPR laboratories, chemists, engineers and biomedical applicants from 3 universities and in partnering with medical industry and international collaborators, will form an internationally competitive National EPR and Molecular Imaging Center for the promotion and maintenance of good health.

Vortex Induced Vibration and Sound

Licences for Fluent Software

Writable Cdrom Disk Drive (yamaha Cdr400 + Scsi Kit + Cables + Software and Seagate 4500 Mb Scsi Hard Disk Drive

Computational fluid dynamics modelling of the shear stresses and oxygen transfer in a spinner-flask bioreactor for tissue engineering

FLUENT/GAMBIT software licence to be used significantly in both research training and undergraduate course in computational fluid dynamics.

dvancing unsteady bluff-body aerodynamics: applications to elite cycling.

Unsteady aerodynamics remains a subject that is not well understood. This project aims to advance the state of knowledge of aerodynamic wakes generated by moving bluff-bodies. The primary objective will be the characterization of the interaction between periodic motion of the body and the resultant wake flow field. By better understanding this interaction the outcomes of this work will feed into the broad fields of bluff body and active aerodynamics. This understanding will contribute to the longer term goal of reducing of aerodynamic drag and improving active aerodynamic control across a wide range of industries.

Optimisation of Blading Design for Stirred Mixing Vessels

To Attend and Present Paper at the Second IUTAM Symposium on Bluff Body Wakes and Vortex Induced Vibration, Marseille, France and Research Visits

Fluid Dynamics of Circulation: Focus on the Kidney

High blood pressure is a major national health problem in Australia and is related to the development of heart disease. There is now compelling evidence for a crucial role of the kidney in the control of blood pressure. There are 3 features of the renal circulation that are unique to the kidney. These appear to be critical for the ability of the kidney to control blood pressure. Using laboratory models, a team of engineers and physiologists will investigate fluid flow within the renal circulation, focusing on these 3 unique aspects. We will use models of the renal circulation to study aspects of its control that cannot be studied in the kidney itself. It is expected that strategies will emerge to tackle the problem of hypertension.

Fluid dynamics software

Transition to Turbulence in Separated Flows Past Long Bluff Bodies

Large Scale Three Dimensional Fluid Flow Prediction and Validation

Teaching Commitments

  • ENG1603 - Multivariate analysis
  • MEC4447 - Computers in fluids and energy
  • MEC3465 - Fluid Mechanics
  • MAE5406 - Computational fluid mechanics
  • MAE1041 - Introduction to Aerospace Engineering
  • MAE2402 - Thermodynamics and heat transfer
  • MEC3454 - Thermodynamics and heat transfer
  • MEC4425 - Micro/nano solid and fluid mechanics
  • MAE5408 - Spaceflight dynamics
Last modified: July 18, 2018