A/Professor Matthew Hill

A/Professor Matthew Hill

Associate Professor
Department of Chemical Engineering

Associate Professor Matthew Hill is an Australian Research Council Future Fellow and the Winner of a 2014 Australian Prime Minister’s Prize for Science. Matthew leads an interdisciplinary team of researchers that are actively involved with industry partners to bring exciting discoveries in the laboratory to market. He holds a joint position between CSIRO and Monash. His research areas include development and application of porous materials: storage, separation and triggered release of small molecules with adsorbents and membranes, flow chemistry, lithium-sulfur batteries and supercapacitors.

Research Experience and Employment History:

CSIRO

Senior Principal Research Scientist, Manufacturing, Nov 2019-present

Principal Research Scientist, Manufacturing, Jan 2014-2019

Senior Research Scientist, Materials Science and Engineering, Jan 2011-2014

Research Scientist, Materials Science and Engineering, Jan 2009-2011

Postdoctoral Researcher, Manufacturing and Materials Technology, 2006-2009

 

MONASH UNIVERSITY

Associate Professor, Chemical Engineering, 2016-present

 

UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO AT BOULDER

Visiting Scientist, Chemical Engineering; 2011

 

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA AT BERKELEY

Visiting Scientist, Chemistry; 2008

 

UNIVERSITY OF ADELAIDE

Adjunct Lecturer, Chemistry; 2011-present

 

UNIVERSITY OF MELBOURNE

Adjunct Lecturer, Chemistry; 2008-present

 

Qualifications

  • High School, North Sydney Boys High
  • Bachelor of Science (BSc) (Hons), University of New South Wales
  • PhD, University of New South Wales
  • Graduate Australian Institute of Company Directors, AICD

Expertise

membranes
metal organic frameworks
porous materials
energy storage

Awards and Honours

2020

Public Service Medal – Department of Prime Minister and Cabinet

2019

David and Valerie Solomon Award – Australian Academy of Technology and Engineering.

Eureka Prize: Outstanding Science in Safeguarding Australia (finalist)

Inaugural Pirkey Fellow, University of Texas at Austin

2018

Class of Influential Researchers, Applied and Industrial Chemistry Research. 

2017

Member: National Committee for Materials Science and Engineering
Australian Academy of Science.

2016

Knowledge Nation 100 Member.
Australian Federal Government.

2015

Future Focus Group Alumnus.
Committee for Melbourne.

2014

Prime Minister’s Prize for Science – Malcolm McIntosh Award for Physical Scientist of the year.
Department of Industry – Australian Federal Government.

Innovators under 35 Awardee, South East Asia Region
MIT Technology Review.

2013

Future Fellowship, ARC.

Award for Sustainable Technology (finalist), IChemEngineering.

Future Focus Group, Committee for Melbourne.

2012

Eureka Prize – Emerging Leadership in Science, Australian Museum.

Australian Leadership Award, Australian Davos Connection.

2011

Finalist – Eureka Prize, Emerging Leadership in Science, Australian Museum.

Victorian Young Tall Poppy of the Year, Australian Institute for Policy and Science.

2010

Julius Career Award, CSIRO.

Victoria Fellowship, Victorian Government.

Research Interests

The overall theme of Matthew’s research is smart, selective capture, release, separation and storage of molecules. Application areas include greenhouse mitigation, energy storage, agriculture, safety and manufacturing.

Matthew’s research interest are in the following areas, Development and application of porous materials: storage, separation and triggered release of small molecules with adsorbents and membranes, flow chemistry, lithium-sulfur batteries and supercapacitors.

Research Projects

Current projects

CO2Gen - A product that produces pure CO2 directly from the atmosphere

We are developing a direct air capture (DAC) product (CO2Gen) that can capture CO2 from ambient air and convert it to pure CO2.

ARC Research Hub for Energy-efficient Separation

The Hub aims to develop advanced separation materials, innovative products and smart processes to reduce the energy consumption of separation processes which underpin Australian industry. The Hub focuses on the development, synthesis, characterisation and integration of advanced materials (membranes, adsorbents and resins), across scales to enable novel products. The intended research outcomes allow the majority of Australian industry to become more energy-efficient and cost-competitive in a global economy. The Hub also aims to develop a highly-trained, industry-ready workforce and advance Australia’s capability as a world-leading technology provider in manufacturing advanced separation materials and equipment.

Toxic gas canisters - department of defence

capture of toxic gases

Research articles, papers & publications

See Matthew Hill’s research contributions through published book chapters, articles, journal papers and in the media.

Supervision

Undergraduate

Ivy Lee
2009 to 2009

James Taylor
2011 to 2011

Rohul Adnan
2010 to 2010

Masters

Michele Gimona
2009 to 2010

Andreas Schulte
2013 to 2013

Maik Tepper
2015 to 2015

Xiquan Zhang
2016 to 2016

PHD

Emily Mensforth
2010 to 2017

Con Dimitrakakis
2011 to 2015

Richelle Lyndon
2011 to 2014

Marziyeh Nazari
2013 to 2016

Mahdokht Shaibani
2013 to 2016

Runhong Huang
2014 to 2017

Stefan Smith
2013 to 2016

Munir Sadiq
2014 to 2017

Ben Slater
2016 to 2020

Marine Michel
2016 to 2020

Leena Melag
2017

Rujing Hou
2017

Brandon He
2017

Areeb Shehzad
2018

Hamidreza Mahdahvi
2019

Ehsan Ghasemiestahbanati
2019

Nathan Eden
2019

Teaching Commitments

  • CHE4172 - Nanomaterials II
  • CHE3172 - Nanomaterials I
  • CHE5883 - Membranes and Membrane Processes
  • CHE1040 - Chemical Engineering Grand Challenges
Last modified: 04/03/2020